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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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Come Up and See Me Sometime

Come Up and See Me Sometime Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Potently witty, neurotic and nervy, Come Up and See Me Sometime marks the arrival of an irresistible new voice in fiction. Erika Krouse's debut story collection about sex and the single girl is smart, sharp-tongued and delightfully addictive.

The thirteen stories in this collection are linked by a common theme: the main characters are all young, childless, geographically and emotionally nomadic women who are searching for self-knowledge and satisfaction in the face of the vicissitudes of single life.

In Krouse's able hands, each of these agile stories manages to cull universal truth from idiosyncratic experience and delirious humor out of deepest pathos. "The Fast" is about a woman who seeks power, independence and immunity from heartbreak through a brief flirtation with a latte diet. "Drugs and You" is the story of an innocent woman who hits a heroin addict with her car and falls blindly in love. In "My Weddings," a woman nearing thirty relates a lifetime of attending nuptials, none of them her own.

Mae West, pop culture's original Liberated Woman, is the ingenious guiding spirit of the collection. Her famous quips — "Peel me a grape," "Come up and see me sometime," "I used to be Snow White but I drifted" — stand as both complement and telling counterpoint to the lives of Krouse's diverse characters. These are smart, searching, quick-witted women who may strive for the unflappable sass and self-sufficiency of a Mae West, but more often fall prey to their own anxieties.

Erika Krouse's perfect comic timing and dead-on one-liners lend levity to each story, and ultimately these seemingly everyday experiences become sly riffs on common fears of loneliness and isolation. Come Up and See Me Sometime is a delightful, thought-provoking and consistently surprising read.

Review:

"Erika Krouse's stories about men and women and all the trouble they cause each other are painfully accurate, relentlessly hopeful and amazingly funny." Daniel Wallace, author of Big Fish and Ray in Reverse

Review:

"In Come Up and See Me Sometime, Erika Krouse makes an intelligent, dreamily off-kilter debut and manages the tricky feat of moving the reader without indulging in a single moment of sentimentality." Jennifer Egan, author of The Invisible Circus

Review:

"Erika Krouse's prose is fresh and inventive, bursting with wit and oddball charm. Whether her characters are looking at the light at the end of the tunnel or just looking at the tunnel itself, these tales of women searching for love and connection are deft, moving and acutely funny. Reading this book is a bit like finding yourself seated next to a fascinating guest at a stuffy dinner party: a wonderful, unexpected delight." Stacey Richter, author of My Date with Satan

Review:

"Erika Krouse invokes the free-spirited sass of Mae West by setting off each short story in her promising debut collection with a Mae West quip. Like her muse, Krouse focuses on savvy, sexy women who need loving, but need their autonomy more. Propelled by mordant wit, and an honesty that can sting, these gripping stories sometimes veer into dark territory. Their compressed intensity explodes on impact." Emily Wortis Leider, author of the biography Becoming Mae West

Review:

"These stories are smart, funny and unexpected. There is surprising range here. The patience of the work is beautiful, allowing full appreciation of the craft without calling attention to it." Percival Everett, author of Glyph and Watershed

Review:

"There are a lot of intelligent, wisecracking, bruised women stomping through the pages of Come Up and See Me Sometime....With her instinctive grasp of the darkness lurking in the corners of female comedy, Krouse is closer in spirit to Lorrie Moore than Melissa Bank....Krouse finds ways to push her observations beyond what we're used to seeing presented as the limits of contemporary women's lives....While each of these stories leaves a vivid impression, some have stayed with me in an especially visceral way: 'Impersonators,' for instance, which starts out feeling conventional, explodes our expectations....With the same deft touch she's used to make us laugh at life's ugly and unfortunate turns, Krouse takes a knotty and confusing situation and leaves us with a feeling of unbounded, exhilarating possibility." Maria Russo, The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

Each of the 13 stories in this collection is underscored by the brassy spirit of Mae West. "Come Up and See Me Sometime" is a thought-provoking rant, surprising readers with mirror images of the fears, foibles, and facades of their own lives.

Synopsis:

Collects thirteen stories about women navigating their way through life and relationships while retaining their independence, and deals with issues including weddings, drugs, poverty, abortion, and loneliness.

Synopsis:

Potently witty, neurotic and nervy, Come Up and See Me Sometime marks the arrival of an irresistible new voice in fiction. Erika Krouse's debut story collection about sex and the single girl is smart, sharp-tongued and delightfully addictive.

The thirteen stories in this collection are linked by a common theme: the main characters are all young, childless, geographically and emotionally nomadic women who are searching for self-knowledge and satisfaction in the face of the vicissitudes of single life.

In Krouse's able hands, each of these agile stories manages to cull universal truth from idiosyncratic experience and delirious humor out of deepest pathos. "The Fast" is about a woman who seeks power, independence and immunity from heartbreak through a brief flirtation with a latte diet. "Drugs and You" is the story of an innocent woman who hits a heroin addict with her car and falls blindly in love. In "My Weddings," a woman nearing thirty relates a lifetime of attending nuptials, none of them her own.

Mae West, pop culture's original Liberated Woman, is the ingenious guiding spirit of the collection. Her famous quips — "Peel me a grape," "Come up and see me sometime," "I used to be Snow White but I drifted" — stand as both complement and telling counterpoint to the lives of Krouse's diverse characters. These are smart, searching, quick-witted women who may strive for the unflappable sass and self-sufficiency of a Mae West, but more often fall prey to their own anxieties.

Erika Krouse's perfect comic timing and dead-on one-liners lend levity to each story, and ultimately these seemingly everyday experiences become sly riffs on common fears of loneliness and isolation. Come Up and See Me Sometime is a delightful, thought-provoking and consistently surprising read.

About the Author

ERIKA KROUSE'S stories have been published in The Atlantic Monthly, Story, Ploughshares, The New Yorker, and Shenandoah. She lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Table of Contents

Contents

My Weddings

No Universe

Drugs and You

Mercy

Too Big to Float

Other People's Mothers

Her First Earthquake

Impersonators

Momentum

The Husbands

The Fast

Via Texas

What I Wore

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743202442
Subtitle:
Stories
Author:
Krouse, Erika
Publisher:
Scribner
Location:
New York
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
General Fiction
Copyright:
Series Volume:
no. 38
Publication Date:
20010703
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.4375 x 5.5 in 12.736 oz

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Come Up and See Me Sometime
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 208 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9780743202442 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Erika Krouse's stories about men and women and all the trouble they cause each other are painfully accurate, relentlessly hopeful and amazingly funny."
"Review" by , "In Come Up and See Me Sometime, Erika Krouse makes an intelligent, dreamily off-kilter debut and manages the tricky feat of moving the reader without indulging in a single moment of sentimentality." Jennifer Egan, author of The Invisible Circus
"Review" by , "Erika Krouse's prose is fresh and inventive, bursting with wit and oddball charm. Whether her characters are looking at the light at the end of the tunnel or just looking at the tunnel itself, these tales of women searching for love and connection are deft, moving and acutely funny. Reading this book is a bit like finding yourself seated next to a fascinating guest at a stuffy dinner party: a wonderful, unexpected delight."
"Review" by , "Erika Krouse invokes the free-spirited sass of Mae West by setting off each short story in her promising debut collection with a Mae West quip. Like her muse, Krouse focuses on savvy, sexy women who need loving, but need their autonomy more. Propelled by mordant wit, and an honesty that can sting, these gripping stories sometimes veer into dark territory. Their compressed intensity explodes on impact."
"Review" by , "These stories are smart, funny and unexpected. There is surprising range here. The patience of the work is beautiful, allowing full appreciation of the craft without calling attention to it."
"Review" by , "There are a lot of intelligent, wisecracking, bruised women stomping through the pages of Come Up and See Me Sometime....With her instinctive grasp of the darkness lurking in the corners of female comedy, Krouse is closer in spirit to Lorrie Moore than Melissa Bank....Krouse finds ways to push her observations beyond what we're used to seeing presented as the limits of contemporary women's lives....While each of these stories leaves a vivid impression, some have stayed with me in an especially visceral way: 'Impersonators,' for instance, which starts out feeling conventional, explodes our expectations....With the same deft touch she's used to make us laugh at life's ugly and unfortunate turns, Krouse takes a knotty and confusing situation and leaves us with a feeling of unbounded, exhilarating possibility."
"Synopsis" by , Each of the 13 stories in this collection is underscored by the brassy spirit of Mae West. "Come Up and See Me Sometime" is a thought-provoking rant, surprising readers with mirror images of the fears, foibles, and facades of their own lives.
"Synopsis" by , Collects thirteen stories about women navigating their way through life and relationships while retaining their independence, and deals with issues including weddings, drugs, poverty, abortion, and loneliness.
"Synopsis" by , Potently witty, neurotic and nervy, Come Up and See Me Sometime marks the arrival of an irresistible new voice in fiction. Erika Krouse's debut story collection about sex and the single girl is smart, sharp-tongued and delightfully addictive.

The thirteen stories in this collection are linked by a common theme: the main characters are all young, childless, geographically and emotionally nomadic women who are searching for self-knowledge and satisfaction in the face of the vicissitudes of single life.

In Krouse's able hands, each of these agile stories manages to cull universal truth from idiosyncratic experience and delirious humor out of deepest pathos. "The Fast" is about a woman who seeks power, independence and immunity from heartbreak through a brief flirtation with a latte diet. "Drugs and You" is the story of an innocent woman who hits a heroin addict with her car and falls blindly in love. In "My Weddings," a woman nearing thirty relates a lifetime of attending nuptials, none of them her own.

Mae West, pop culture's original Liberated Woman, is the ingenious guiding spirit of the collection. Her famous quips — "Peel me a grape," "Come up and see me sometime," "I used to be Snow White but I drifted" — stand as both complement and telling counterpoint to the lives of Krouse's diverse characters. These are smart, searching, quick-witted women who may strive for the unflappable sass and self-sufficiency of a Mae West, but more often fall prey to their own anxieties.

Erika Krouse's perfect comic timing and dead-on one-liners lend levity to each story, and ultimately these seemingly everyday experiences become sly riffs on common fears of loneliness and isolation. Come Up and See Me Sometime is a delightful, thought-provoking and consistently surprising read.

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