Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 4, 2014

    Fred Armisen: IMG Fred Armisen: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.50
List price: $16.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

The Master

by

The Master Cover

ISBN13: 9780743250412
ISBN10: 0743250419
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $6.50!

 

Staff Pick

At the start of the 1900s, Henry James produced three masterpieces in as many years: first The Wings of the Dove, then The Ambassadors, and next The Golden Bowl. The Master introduces James six years prior, in January 1895, on the eve of his great public failure, as "Guy Domville" premieres on the London stage and wholly, horribly, flops.

"Nothing had prepared him for this," Tóibín writes. "For his friends, this night would be entered into the annals of the unmentionable, pages in which he had so studiously avoided having his name appear."

Nothing could be worse than that, to be exposed.

The Master is provocative, nuanced portraiture; Tóibín is a master himself at masking and unmasking, at revealing exactly what he must and nothing more. Luxuriously rendered, his fiction shares with that of James a wealth of piercing, precise observation; loaded, subtle gestures; and "exhilarating duplicities."
Recommended by Dave, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"[T]he Irish novelist Colm Tóibín has written several subtly imagined works of fiction, including The Blackwater Lightship, which was short-listed for the 1999 Booker Prize. And, against all odds, he succeeds here. The Master is a small tour de force of a novel....[A] lovely portrait of the artist, rich in fictional truth." Paula Marantz Cohen, The Times Literary Supplement (read the entire Times Literary Supplement review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The aftermath of Franz Kafkas love affair with Dora Diamant is legend: refusing to honor his instructions to destroy his work when he died, Diamant saved Kafkas writings and letters that were in her possession. These were later taken by the Nazis and are still being sought today. Her importance for Kafkas literary legacy makes their all-too-brief relationship even more intriguing. Set over the course of his last year, The Glory of Life is compelling fictional re-imagining of this fragile, tender romance. 

In July 1923, Kafka is convalescing by the Baltic Sea when he meets Diamant and they fall in love. He is forty years old and dying of tuberculosis; she is twenty-five and seems to him the essence of life. After a tentative first meeting, the indecisive Kafka moves with Diamant to Berlin, a city in the throes of political upheaval, rising anti-Semitism, and the turmoil of Weimar-era hyperinflation. As his tuberculosis advances, they are forced to leave the city for the Kierling Sanatorium near Vienna, a move that threatens the paradise they have created.

The first of Kumpfmüllers novels to appear in English after his acclaimed The Adventures of a Bed Salesman, The Glory of Life is a meticulously researched and poignant portrait of one of the most enduring authors in world literature. Beautifully crafted, this book is an evocative rumination on the power of love and friendship.

Review:

"There's little in Colm Tóibín's previous work, to some of which this reviewer has been immune or even mildly allergic, to prepare for the startling excellence of his new novel. The Master is a portrait of Henry James that has the depth and finish of great sculpture." Adam Mars-Jones, The Observer

Review:

"A formidably brilliant performance." Kirkus Reviews (Starred Reviews)

Review:

"Even the reader who knows little about Henry James or his work can enjoy this marvelously intelligent and engaging novel, which presents not on a silver platter but in tender, opened hands a beautifully nuanced psychological portrait." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"This is an audacious, profound, and wonderfully intelligent book." The Guardian

Review:

"If Leon Edel's five-volume life of Henry James is the literary equivalent of a vast but perfectly articulated symphony, this novel can best be described as a series of brilliant études based on themes derived from it." Francis King, Literary Review

Review:

"A sympathetic and triumphant novel of startling excellence....The Master is a portrait of Henry James that has the depth and finish of great sculpture." The Observer

Review:

"Tóibín's enthralling novel displays — in a manner that is masterly — the wit and metaphorical flair, psychological subtlety and phrases of pouncing incisiveness with which a great novelist captured the nuances of consciousness and duplicities of society." Sunday Times Review

Review:

"The subtlety and empathy with which Tóibín inhabits James's psyche and captures the fleeting emotional nuances of his world are beyond praise....Far more than a stunt, this is a riveting, if inevitably somewhat evasive, portrait of the creative life." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Superbly controlled... this novel is a masterful, unshowy meditation on work, ambition, friendship, longing and mortality." Maureen N. McLane, Chicago Tribune

Review:

"[S]crupulously researched and artfully rendered....Tóibín excels at showing us...the connections between James's life and his fictional oeuvre. Highly recommended." Library Journal

Synopsis:

In July 1923, Franz Kafka is convalescing by the Baltic Sea when he meets Dora Diamant and they fall in love. He is forty years old and is dying; she is twenty-five and seems to him to be the essence of life itself.

Set over the course of Kafkas last year, The Glory of Life is the story of a fragile, tender romance. After a tentative first meeting an indecisive Kafka moves with Dora to Berlin - a city in the throes of political upheaval, rising anti-Semitism and the turmoil of Weimar-era hyper-inflation - before the tragic advance of his tuberculosis forces them to the Kierling Sanatorium near Vienna, threatening the paradise they have created.

Meticulously researched and beautifully crafted, The Glory of Life is a poignant portrait of one of the most enduring authors in world literature and an evocative rumination on the power of love and friendship.

Synopsis:

Like Michael Cunningham in The Hours, Colm Tóibín captures the extraordinary mind and heart of a great writer. Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of a man born into one of America's first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers.

In stunningly resonant prose, Tóibín captures the loneliness and the hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably failed those he tried to love. The emotional intensity of this portrait is riveting.

Synopsis:

Like Michael Cunningham in The Hours, Colm Tóibín captures the extraordinary mind and heart of a great writer. Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of a man born into one of America's first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers.

In stunningly resonant prose, Tóibín captures the loneliness and the hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably failed those he tried to love. The emotional intensity of this portrait is riveting.

About the Author

Colm TÓibÍn is the author of six novels, The South, The Heather Blazing, The Story of the Night, The Blackwater Lightship, The Master, and Brooklyn, as well as the story collection Mothers and Sons. He has been twice nominated for the Booker Prize. He lives in Dublin and New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

c-dawg, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by c-dawg)
Brilliant. A re-read, and the best thing I read in 2012.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Alisha C, September 18, 2011 (view all comments by Alisha C)
Toibin's striking narration gets you so close to Henry James you can almost hear him breathing. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel with all of it's texture and depth. A story full of the subtleties of growing old, living with the past and an exploration of self and sexuality.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Diane Lederman, January 3, 2010 (view all comments by Diane Lederman)
This was perfect book, well imagined, rich, fascinating.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743250412
Author:
Toibin, Colm
Publisher:
Scribner Book Company
Author:
Bell, Anthea
Author:
ller, Michael
Author:
Kumpfm
Author:
Michael Kumpfm
Author:
ller
Author:
uuml
Author:
&
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Authors
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
England
Subject:
Biographical fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Subject:
man booker prize; ireland; wexford; dublin; inniscorthy; pen festival; lambda; gay fiction; irish fiction; literary fiction; costa book award; stanford; princeton; columbia; UT Austin; IMPAC award; the master; nora webster; brooklyn; nypl; new yorker; tes
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
May 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.9 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Great Fire
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  2. Case Histories: A Novel
    Used Mass Market $3.95
  3. The Portrait of a Lady (Penguin...
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  4. Line of Beauty Used Mass Market $3.50
  5. Author Author Used Trade Paper $7.95
  6. Birds Without Wings
    Used Hardcover $6.95

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Master Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9780743250412 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

At the start of the 1900s, Henry James produced three masterpieces in as many years: first The Wings of the Dove, then The Ambassadors, and next The Golden Bowl. The Master introduces James six years prior, in January 1895, on the eve of his great public failure, as "Guy Domville" premieres on the London stage and wholly, horribly, flops.

"Nothing had prepared him for this," Tóibín writes. "For his friends, this night would be entered into the annals of the unmentionable, pages in which he had so studiously avoided having his name appear."

Nothing could be worse than that, to be exposed.

The Master is provocative, nuanced portraiture; Tóibín is a master himself at masking and unmasking, at revealing exactly what he must and nothing more. Luxuriously rendered, his fiction shares with that of James a wealth of piercing, precise observation; loaded, subtle gestures; and "exhilarating duplicities."

"Review A Day" by , "[T]he Irish novelist Colm Tóibín has written several subtly imagined works of fiction, including The Blackwater Lightship, which was short-listed for the 1999 Booker Prize. And, against all odds, he succeeds here. The Master is a small tour de force of a novel....[A] lovely portrait of the artist, rich in fictional truth." (read the entire Times Literary Supplement review)
"Review" by , "There's little in Colm Tóibín's previous work, to some of which this reviewer has been immune or even mildly allergic, to prepare for the startling excellence of his new novel. The Master is a portrait of Henry James that has the depth and finish of great sculpture."
"Review" by , "A formidably brilliant performance."
"Review" by , "Even the reader who knows little about Henry James or his work can enjoy this marvelously intelligent and engaging novel, which presents not on a silver platter but in tender, opened hands a beautifully nuanced psychological portrait."
"Review" by , "This is an audacious, profound, and wonderfully intelligent book."
"Review" by , "If Leon Edel's five-volume life of Henry James is the literary equivalent of a vast but perfectly articulated symphony, this novel can best be described as a series of brilliant études based on themes derived from it."
"Review" by , "A sympathetic and triumphant novel of startling excellence....The Master is a portrait of Henry James that has the depth and finish of great sculpture."
"Review" by , "Tóibín's enthralling novel displays — in a manner that is masterly — the wit and metaphorical flair, psychological subtlety and phrases of pouncing incisiveness with which a great novelist captured the nuances of consciousness and duplicities of society."
"Review" by , "The subtlety and empathy with which Tóibín inhabits James's psyche and captures the fleeting emotional nuances of his world are beyond praise....Far more than a stunt, this is a riveting, if inevitably somewhat evasive, portrait of the creative life."
"Review" by , "Superbly controlled... this novel is a masterful, unshowy meditation on work, ambition, friendship, longing and mortality."
"Review" by , "[S]crupulously researched and artfully rendered....Tóibín excels at showing us...the connections between James's life and his fictional oeuvre. Highly recommended."
"Synopsis" by ,

In July 1923, Franz Kafka is convalescing by the Baltic Sea when he meets Dora Diamant and they fall in love. He is forty years old and is dying; she is twenty-five and seems to him to be the essence of life itself.

Set over the course of Kafkas last year, The Glory of Life is the story of a fragile, tender romance. After a tentative first meeting an indecisive Kafka moves with Dora to Berlin - a city in the throes of political upheaval, rising anti-Semitism and the turmoil of Weimar-era hyper-inflation - before the tragic advance of his tuberculosis forces them to the Kierling Sanatorium near Vienna, threatening the paradise they have created.

Meticulously researched and beautifully crafted, The Glory of Life is a poignant portrait of one of the most enduring authors in world literature and an evocative rumination on the power of love and friendship.

"Synopsis" by , Like Michael Cunningham in The Hours, Colm Tóibín captures the extraordinary mind and heart of a great writer. Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of a man born into one of America's first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers.

In stunningly resonant prose, Tóibín captures the loneliness and the hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably failed those he tried to love. The emotional intensity of this portrait is riveting.

"Synopsis" by , Like Michael Cunningham in The Hours, Colm Tóibín captures the extraordinary mind and heart of a great writer. Beautiful and profoundly moving, The Master tells the story of a man born into one of America's first intellectual families who leaves his country in the late nineteenth century to live in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London among privileged artists and writers.

In stunningly resonant prose, Tóibín captures the loneliness and the hope of a master of psychological subtlety whose forays into intimacy inevitably failed those he tried to love. The emotional intensity of this portrait is riveting.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.