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Citizen Girl: A Novel

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Citizen Girl: A Novel Cover

ISBN13: 9780743266857
ISBN10: 0743266854
Condition: Standard
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Review-A-Day

"Citizen Girl takes shots at every single instance of one woman's confrontation with male society during the course of a few months. It does this while being wickedly funny and well written but not dogmatic or finger wagging....Every working woman in her twenties and thirties can relate to this novel and laugh along with the all-too disturbing situations Girl finds herself in. Citizen Girl proves that young working women are a huge market who don't need anachronistic books about shopping or romance shoved down their throats." Sacha Zimmerman, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Another biting satire from Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus, authors of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Nanny Diaries.

Working in a world where a college degree qualifies her to make photocopies and color-coordinate file folders, twenty-four-year-old Girl is struggling to keep up with the essential trinity of food, shelter, and student loans. So when she finally lands the job of her dreams she ignores her misgivings and concentrates on getting the job done...whatever that may be.

Sharply observed and devastatingly funny, Citizen Girl captures with biting accuracy what it means to be young and female in the new economy. A personal glimpse into an impersonal world, Citizen Girl is edgy and heartfelt, an entertaining read that is startlingly relevant.

Review:

"McLaughlin and Kraus (The Nanny Diaries) are back with another tale of woe featuring a 20-something New Yorker searching for a way out of her miserable life. This hyperventilating satire features Girl, an ambitious feminist whose well-known girl-empowering boss saddles Girl with the worst tasks, steals her ideas and finally cans her for speaking out. After a desperate search, Girl is hired for a dream job with a matching dream salary. As the Director of Rebranding Knowledge Acquisition for My Company, she doesn't exactly know what she's supposed to do, but it involves dodgy activities with her boss and being made over to fit in with a new California client. 'You're lucky to even be here....We're about to buy you a few thousand dollars' worth of suits. So just go try on the Goddamn bikini....Honey, what're ya gonna do about the bush?' As work goes from bad to worse, the only light in Girl's tunnel is Buster — a sweet boy/man who creates video games for a living and who fluctuates between fleeing Girl and being there for her. But when a new boss takes My Company into a whole new darker direction (think sex industry), Girl is forced to make a decision between morals and money. Though witty and biting in spots, this bitter tale is too schematic and strident to be much fun. Agent, Suzanne Gluck at ICM. (Dec.) Forecast: The peccadilloes of Upper East Side mothers are a far cry from the sins catalogued here. Nanny Diary fans who pick this up may find they've gotten more than they bargained for. " Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Many, many funny lines, somewhat incoherent plot. But Girl's job-hunting woes will resonate with lots of readers." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"McLaughlin and Kraus deftly satirize postfeminist, postmodern, twenty-first-century America....The authors have conjured up a vision of America that's just this side of dystopian, and their funhouse-mirror worldview generates its own strange suspense." Booklist

Review:

"A satire about staying true to one's values while also staying employed, [Citizen Girl] is meatier and more engaging than Diaries — think The Beauty Myth meets Sex and the City....McLaughlin and Kraus keep us amused." Austin American-Statesman

Review:

"[T]he much anticipated, overhyped encore from this writing duo isn't as moving or believable....McLaughlin and Kraus don't seem to be up to the challenge....Citizen Girl lags behind The Nanny Diaries in originality, believability and plot." Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"Citizen Girl is more full of limp cartoons than it is of real and relevant crusades....This clever team may have made a bit of a mess here, but it's nothing they can't clean up next time around." Newsday

Review:

"Not only will this latest comic adventure appeal to the thousands of less-than-affluent urbanites who laughed through the duo's best-selling debut...but it would also seem to be a natural for young working women dealing with crazy bosses and shifting job descriptions." Boston Globe

Review:

"[A] readable, lively book...an entertaining read that puts in perspective just how crazy all workplaces are....[A] welcome addition to its genre: instead of a decent husband, our heroine seeks a sane boss. Funny that they're equally elusive." New York Sun

Review:

"The Nanny Diaries team is back with another biting satire....While a fun if a bit harsh read, the novel gets drawn out near the end." Library Journal

Review:

"Stranded between its glib, high-gloss tone...and its earnest attempts to say something deep about the new economy and young women's place in it, this is one confused Girl." The Village Voice

Review:

"[A] royal bore....The passing years haven't done much to sharpen the writers' prose style....The girls will probably coast on their earlier success and the continued fine work of their jacket designers... (Grade: D)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"These young authors have a knack for comedy, and there are priceless scenes here, some set at career fairs and in the halls of NYU, that will delight cubicle dwellers everywhere." Hampton Family Life

Review:

"[Their formula] was fresh and subversive the first time, made famous by its wryly observed details. This new novel, however, has the staleness of '80s chick-empowerment movie Working Girl, and the details now bore instead of titilate." Buffalo News

Review:

"[H]aving to read this brain-numbing book from start to finish...was the visual equivalent of a chokehold....A noble endeavor but flimsy characters, bad writing and an absurd excuse for a plot make Citizen Girl a major disappointment." USA Today

Review:

"In The Nanny Diaries, McLaughlin and Kraus successfully parodied the world they knew; here it's hard to keep track of the (rather blunt) barbs as they wobble toward their various targets." The New Yorker

Synopsis:

Citizen Girl follows an ambitious and idealistic young woman as she confronts what it means to be young and female in the new economy, where a college degree entitles you to make copies and color-coordinate file folders — if you're lucky. Struggling to keep up with the essentials of food, shelter, and student loans. Girl works with a group of waist-band-adverse women who refuse to acknowledge her talents or her ambition. But the "job from hell" is nowhere near as bad as unemployment turns out to be — so when Girl finally lands the job of her dreams, she ignores her misgivings and concentrates on getting the job done...even though she's not quite sure what the job is...

Synopsis:

"Citizen Girl" follows an ambitious and idealistic young woman as she confronts what it means to be young and female in the new economy, where a college degree entitles one to make copies and color-coordinate file folders--if one is lucky. From the authors of "The Nanny Diaries."

About the Author

Nicola Kraus and Emma McLaughlin write together in New York City. This is their second novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lizmvr, July 21, 2006 (view all comments by lizmvr)
I haven't read The Nanny Diaries yet; so, I can't compare Citizen Girl to previous work. I don't like this book, though.

I'm still in my twenties and find the main character boring and stupid. She's condescending even as she can't seem to figure out her own work role. While I didn't grow fond of her first boss, I found Girl, the main character with a ridiculous name, to be passive agressive which doesn't work for her or the reader. Girl is not someone that I want to see triumph. If she really was as together and wise as she thinks she is, I'd rather read about her adventures after listening to her mother as Girl starts her own company rather than being swept along by My Company's Guy, who obviously has yet another ridiculous name.

Overall, Citizen Girl is so annoying that I'm not sure I'll even make it to the end.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743266857
Author:
Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus
Publisher:
Atria
Author:
McLaughlin, Emma
Author:
Kraus, Nicola
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Employment
Subject:
General Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st
Edition Description:
Atria Bks Hdcvr
Publication Date:
November 16, 2004
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.92x5.72x1.11 in. .92 lbs.

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Citizen Girl: A Novel Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Atria Books - English 9780743266857 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "McLaughlin and Kraus (The Nanny Diaries) are back with another tale of woe featuring a 20-something New Yorker searching for a way out of her miserable life. This hyperventilating satire features Girl, an ambitious feminist whose well-known girl-empowering boss saddles Girl with the worst tasks, steals her ideas and finally cans her for speaking out. After a desperate search, Girl is hired for a dream job with a matching dream salary. As the Director of Rebranding Knowledge Acquisition for My Company, she doesn't exactly know what she's supposed to do, but it involves dodgy activities with her boss and being made over to fit in with a new California client. 'You're lucky to even be here....We're about to buy you a few thousand dollars' worth of suits. So just go try on the Goddamn bikini....Honey, what're ya gonna do about the bush?' As work goes from bad to worse, the only light in Girl's tunnel is Buster — a sweet boy/man who creates video games for a living and who fluctuates between fleeing Girl and being there for her. But when a new boss takes My Company into a whole new darker direction (think sex industry), Girl is forced to make a decision between morals and money. Though witty and biting in spots, this bitter tale is too schematic and strident to be much fun. Agent, Suzanne Gluck at ICM. (Dec.) Forecast: The peccadilloes of Upper East Side mothers are a far cry from the sins catalogued here. Nanny Diary fans who pick this up may find they've gotten more than they bargained for. " Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Citizen Girl takes shots at every single instance of one woman's confrontation with male society during the course of a few months. It does this while being wickedly funny and well written but not dogmatic or finger wagging....Every working woman in her twenties and thirties can relate to this novel and laugh along with the all-too disturbing situations Girl finds herself in. Citizen Girl proves that young working women are a huge market who don't need anachronistic books about shopping or romance shoved down their throats." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "Many, many funny lines, somewhat incoherent plot. But Girl's job-hunting woes will resonate with lots of readers."
"Review" by , "McLaughlin and Kraus deftly satirize postfeminist, postmodern, twenty-first-century America....The authors have conjured up a vision of America that's just this side of dystopian, and their funhouse-mirror worldview generates its own strange suspense."
"Review" by , "A satire about staying true to one's values while also staying employed, [Citizen Girl] is meatier and more engaging than Diaries — think The Beauty Myth meets Sex and the City....McLaughlin and Kraus keep us amused."
"Review" by , "[T]he much anticipated, overhyped encore from this writing duo isn't as moving or believable....McLaughlin and Kraus don't seem to be up to the challenge....Citizen Girl lags behind The Nanny Diaries in originality, believability and plot."
"Review" by , "Citizen Girl is more full of limp cartoons than it is of real and relevant crusades....This clever team may have made a bit of a mess here, but it's nothing they can't clean up next time around."
"Review" by , "Not only will this latest comic adventure appeal to the thousands of less-than-affluent urbanites who laughed through the duo's best-selling debut...but it would also seem to be a natural for young working women dealing with crazy bosses and shifting job descriptions."
"Review" by , "[A] readable, lively book...an entertaining read that puts in perspective just how crazy all workplaces are....[A] welcome addition to its genre: instead of a decent husband, our heroine seeks a sane boss. Funny that they're equally elusive."
"Review" by , "The Nanny Diaries team is back with another biting satire....While a fun if a bit harsh read, the novel gets drawn out near the end."
"Review" by , "Stranded between its glib, high-gloss tone...and its earnest attempts to say something deep about the new economy and young women's place in it, this is one confused Girl."
"Review" by , "[A] royal bore....The passing years haven't done much to sharpen the writers' prose style....The girls will probably coast on their earlier success and the continued fine work of their jacket designers... (Grade: D)"
"Review" by , "These young authors have a knack for comedy, and there are priceless scenes here, some set at career fairs and in the halls of NYU, that will delight cubicle dwellers everywhere."
"Review" by , "[Their formula] was fresh and subversive the first time, made famous by its wryly observed details. This new novel, however, has the staleness of '80s chick-empowerment movie Working Girl, and the details now bore instead of titilate."
"Review" by , "[H]aving to read this brain-numbing book from start to finish...was the visual equivalent of a chokehold....A noble endeavor but flimsy characters, bad writing and an absurd excuse for a plot make Citizen Girl a major disappointment."
"Review" by , "In The Nanny Diaries, McLaughlin and Kraus successfully parodied the world they knew; here it's hard to keep track of the (rather blunt) barbs as they wobble toward their various targets."
"Synopsis" by , Citizen Girl follows an ambitious and idealistic young woman as she confronts what it means to be young and female in the new economy, where a college degree entitles you to make copies and color-coordinate file folders — if you're lucky. Struggling to keep up with the essentials of food, shelter, and student loans. Girl works with a group of waist-band-adverse women who refuse to acknowledge her talents or her ambition. But the "job from hell" is nowhere near as bad as unemployment turns out to be — so when Girl finally lands the job of her dreams, she ignores her misgivings and concentrates on getting the job done...even though she's not quite sure what the job is...
"Synopsis" by , "Citizen Girl" follows an ambitious and idealistic young woman as she confronts what it means to be young and female in the new economy, where a college degree entitles one to make copies and color-coordinate file folders--if one is lucky. From the authors of "The Nanny Diaries."
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