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Something Remains

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Something Remains Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Erich Levi doesn't quite understand why his father is so gloomy when the Nazis are elected to power. He's too concerned with keeping his grades up, finding time to hang out by the river with his friends, and studying for his bar mitzvah to worry much about politics.

But slowly, things begin to change for Erich. Some of the teachers begin to grade him harshly and unfairly — because he’s Jewish. They humiliate him and exclude him from sports events and celebrations. Erich puts up with bullying from the Hitler Youth boys in his class, boys made important and powerful by the uniforms they wear. Most painfully, his best friend, Kurt, shuns him entirely. At home, things are no better. Money becomes more and more scarce as his father’s cattle business suffers, and even his mother’s friends look away when they pass on the street.

Not everyone is so cruel, though, and many of the Levis' friends and neighbors remain fiercely loyal at great risk to themselves. With good people still around, Erich can't believe the situation will last, and stubbornly holds on to his dreams — even as the home he's always known becomes a dangerous and alien place.

Inge Barth-Grözinger has brilliantly re-created the life of a Jewish family in a small German town during the Nazi era.

Review:

"When the Nazi Party takes over the German government, 12-year-old Erich Levi notices that his once vibrant household has turned somber. 'His mother hadn't laughed as often as usual, and his father's mischievous face suddenly looked gaunt.' Things also change at school. Daily, Erich faces humiliations by cruel teachers and classmates, and Jews are excluded from extracurricular activities, including sports. The most painful development is that people who once spoke openly to his family now look the other way and refuse to do business with them. Erich's best friend, Kurt, joins the Jungvolk (the junior section of Hitler Youth) and no longer acknowledges Erich for fear of the consequences. Erich struggles to understand why Hitler hates Jews ('We're Germans ourselves!' the boy points out). Life continues year after year in the tranquil village of Ellwangen, but just below the surface brews a mixture of anger and hatred, making life for the few Jewish residents intolerable and dangerous. First-time author Bart-Grözinger wrote Erich's story after doing a research project with her students on the Jewish community in Ellwangen during the Nazi regime (see Children's Books, Oct. 23). 'A mixture of fiction and historical fact,' according to an author's note, this chilling story asks readers to speculate how the Holocaust could have happened. The child's viewpoint gives the events immediacy, and the author's note offers further historical details about the Levis after they safely emigrated to America. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"When the Nazi Party takes over the German government, 12-year-old Erich Levi notices that his once vibrant household has turned somber. 'His mother hadn't laughed as often as usual, and his father's mischievous face suddenly looked gaunt.' Things also change at school. Daily, Erich faces humiliations by cruel teachers and classmates, and Jews are excluded from extracurricular activities, including sports. The most painful development is that people who once spoke openly to his family now look the other way and refuse to do business with them. Erich's best friend, Kurt, joins the Jungvolk (the junior section of Hitler Youth) and no longer acknowledges Erich for fear of the consequences. Erich struggles to understand why Hitler hates Jews ('We're Germans ourselves!' the boy points out). Life continues year after year in the tranquil village of Ellwangen, but just below the surface brews a mixture of anger and hatred, making life for the few Jewish residents intolerable and dangerous. First-time author Bart-Grzinger wrote Erich's story after doing a research project with her students on the Jewish community in Ellwangen during the Nazi regime (see Children's Books, Oct. 23). 'A mixture of fiction and historical fact,' according to an author's note, this chilling story asks readers to speculate how the Holocaust could have happened. The child's viewpoint gives the events immediacy, and the author's note offers further historical details about the Levis after they safely emigrated to America. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The everyday detail may overwhelm many readers, but even given the wealth of Holocaust fiction on shelves today, little has been written about the early years of the Nazis." Booklist

Review:

"[P]resents a shocking microcosm of Nazi persecution of German Jews, as well as a moving lesson in the evil of mass racial intolerance and the great goodness of individual moral courage as witnessed by an innocent school boy." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"This fictionalized window into what are becoming myriad choices in Holocaust literature for young people is and additional purchase." School Library Journal

About the Author

Inge Barth-Grözinger is a gymnasium (high school) teacher in Ellwangen, Germany. Something Remains grew out of an eighteen-month research project she conducted with her students, tracing the Jewish community of their town and school. It was the story of one student in particular, Erich Levi, that inspired Ms. Grözinger to write this novel.

Anthea Bell is an award-winning translator of books for children and adults. She has translated the works of W.G. Sebald and Cornelia Funke, among others. She lives in Cambridge, England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780786838806
Author:
Barth-grozinger, Inge
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Translator:
Bell, Anthea
Author:
Barth-Grozinger, Inge
Author:
Barth-Grozinger, Inge
Subject:
General
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Prejudices
Subject:
Historical - Europe
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
Historical - Holocaust
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20080513
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 5 up to 9
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 23.6 oz
Age Level:
10-22

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Related Subjects

Children's » Historical Fiction » Holocaust

Something Remains Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Hyperion Books - English 9780786838806 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "When the Nazi Party takes over the German government, 12-year-old Erich Levi notices that his once vibrant household has turned somber. 'His mother hadn't laughed as often as usual, and his father's mischievous face suddenly looked gaunt.' Things also change at school. Daily, Erich faces humiliations by cruel teachers and classmates, and Jews are excluded from extracurricular activities, including sports. The most painful development is that people who once spoke openly to his family now look the other way and refuse to do business with them. Erich's best friend, Kurt, joins the Jungvolk (the junior section of Hitler Youth) and no longer acknowledges Erich for fear of the consequences. Erich struggles to understand why Hitler hates Jews ('We're Germans ourselves!' the boy points out). Life continues year after year in the tranquil village of Ellwangen, but just below the surface brews a mixture of anger and hatred, making life for the few Jewish residents intolerable and dangerous. First-time author Bart-Grözinger wrote Erich's story after doing a research project with her students on the Jewish community in Ellwangen during the Nazi regime (see Children's Books, Oct. 23). 'A mixture of fiction and historical fact,' according to an author's note, this chilling story asks readers to speculate how the Holocaust could have happened. The child's viewpoint gives the events immediacy, and the author's note offers further historical details about the Levis after they safely emigrated to America. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "When the Nazi Party takes over the German government, 12-year-old Erich Levi notices that his once vibrant household has turned somber. 'His mother hadn't laughed as often as usual, and his father's mischievous face suddenly looked gaunt.' Things also change at school. Daily, Erich faces humiliations by cruel teachers and classmates, and Jews are excluded from extracurricular activities, including sports. The most painful development is that people who once spoke openly to his family now look the other way and refuse to do business with them. Erich's best friend, Kurt, joins the Jungvolk (the junior section of Hitler Youth) and no longer acknowledges Erich for fear of the consequences. Erich struggles to understand why Hitler hates Jews ('We're Germans ourselves!' the boy points out). Life continues year after year in the tranquil village of Ellwangen, but just below the surface brews a mixture of anger and hatred, making life for the few Jewish residents intolerable and dangerous. First-time author Bart-Grzinger wrote Erich's story after doing a research project with her students on the Jewish community in Ellwangen during the Nazi regime (see Children's Books, Oct. 23). 'A mixture of fiction and historical fact,' according to an author's note, this chilling story asks readers to speculate how the Holocaust could have happened. The child's viewpoint gives the events immediacy, and the author's note offers further historical details about the Levis after they safely emigrated to America. Ages 10-up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The everyday detail may overwhelm many readers, but even given the wealth of Holocaust fiction on shelves today, little has been written about the early years of the Nazis."
"Review" by , "[P]resents a shocking microcosm of Nazi persecution of German Jews, as well as a moving lesson in the evil of mass racial intolerance and the great goodness of individual moral courage as witnessed by an innocent school boy."
"Review" by , "This fictionalized window into what are becoming myriad choices in Holocaust literature for young people is and additional purchase."
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