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Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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Breach of Faith: Hurricane Katrina and the Near Death of a Great American City

by

Breach of Faith: Hurricane Katrina and the Near Death of a Great American City Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Hurricane Katrina shredded one of the great cities of the South, and as levees failed and the federal relief effort proved lethally incompetent, a natural disaster became a man-made catastrophe. As an editor of New Orleans daily newspaper, the Pulitzer Prizewinning Times-Picayune, Jed Horne has had a front-row seat to the unfolding drama of the citys collapse into chaos and its continuing struggle to survive.

As the Big One bore down, New Orleanians rich and poor, black and white, lurched from giddy revelry to mandatory evacuation. The thousands who couldnt or wouldnt leave initially congratulated themselves on once again riding out the storm. But then the unimaginable happened: Within a day 80 percent of the city was under water. The rising tides chased horrified men and women into snake-filled attics and onto the roofs of their houses. Heroes in swamp boats and helicopters braved wind and storm surge to bring survivors to dry ground. Mansions and shacks alike were swept away, and then a tidal wave of lawlessness inundated the Big Easy. Screams and gunshots echoed through the blacked-out Superdome. Police threw away their badges and joined in the looting. Corpses drifted in the streets for days, and buildings marinated for weeks in a witches brew of toxic chemicals that, when the floodwaters finally were pumped out, had turned vast reaches of the city into a ghost town.

Horne takes readers into the private worlds and inner thoughts of storm victims from all walks of life to weave a tapestry as intricate and vivid as the city itself. Politicians, thieves, nurses, urban visionaries, grieving mothers, entrepreneurs with an eye for quick profit at public expense–all of these lives collide in a chronicle that is harrowing, angry, and often slyly ironic.

Even before stranded survivors had been plucked from their roofs, government officials embarked on a vicious blame game that further snarled the relief operation and bedeviled scientists striving to understand the massive levee failures and build New Orleans a foolproof flood defense. As Horne makes clear, this shameless politicization set the tone for the ongoing reconstruction effort, which has been haunted by racial and class tensions from the start.

Katrina was a catastrophe deeply rooted in the politics and culture of the city that care forgot and of a nation that forgot to care. In Breach of Faith, Jed Horne has created a spellbinding epic of one of the worst disasters of our time.

Review:

"Horne, metro editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, writes with the clipped, raw urgency of a thriller writer in this humanist account of what happened after the levees broke. As already widely reported, residents who ignored the mandatory evacuation order (thinking 'Katrina...had all the makings of a flop') quickly found themselves surrounded by bloated corpses floating in toxic floodwaters and without a consolidated rescue effort. Horne quickly moves past the melodrama of a striking disaster to recount the stories of individuals caught in the storm's hellish aftermath or mired in the government's hamstrung response: a Louisiana State University climatologist goes head-to-head with the Army Corps of Engineers over inadequate flood protection and faulty levees; a former Black Panther provides emergency health care at a local mosque. Horne saves his sharpest barbs for President Bush and the Department of Homeland Security ('if Homeland Security...was what stood between America and the next 9/11, then...America was in deep trouble') for failing to muster an appropriate response. Big disasters spawn big books, and though Horne's isn't the definitive account, it's an honest, angry and wrenching response to a massively bungled catastrophe." Publishers Weekly(Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"It is hard to imagine that, less than a year after the worst natural disaster in modern U.S. history, there would be much appetite for reliving the horrors of Hurricane Katrina — manmade or otherwise. And it is equally difficult to imagine encountering anything fresh on a subject that's been so thoroughly dissected. Yet in this solid if somewhat detached recounting, New Orleans journalist Jed Horne... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Author Jed Horne takes a correct approach with these subjects and issues....Horne doesn't seem to have any recommendations for regular people like us. It's not that kind of book. It is instead a book that excels when it is chronicling Americans left to rot in sewer tides, dodge snakes and starve in chaos." Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"Horne's ability to flesh out the human dimension of the drama is his very real strength." Boston Globe

Review:

"[Horne] offers something different to the dialogue, something even worth reading....Breach of Faith is not a book about politics, or about blame, but is most powerful when Horne's honest, rarely angry writing assesses the bureaucratic incompetence and failure that compounded the hurricane's mess." Balitmore Sun

Review:

"A heart-wrenching chronicle of nature's wrath and the human condition." Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Jed Horne, a metro editor of The Times-Picayune, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his part in the papers coverage of Hurricane Katrina. His book Desire Street: A True Story of Death and Deliverance in New Orleans was nominated for the 2006 Edgar Award for nonfiction crime writing. He lives in the French Quarter with his wife.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400065523
Subtitle:
Hurricane Katrina and the Near Death of a Great American City
Author:
Horne, Jed
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Disasters
Subject:
Hurricanes
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
United States - 21st Century
Subject:
Disasters & Disaster Relief
Publication Date:
20060711
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 MAPS
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9.52x6.64x1.39 in. 1.55 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » Louisiana
History and Social Science » Americana » Southern States
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Breach of Faith: Hurricane Katrina and the Near Death of a Great American City Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Random House - English 9781400065523 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Horne, metro editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, writes with the clipped, raw urgency of a thriller writer in this humanist account of what happened after the levees broke. As already widely reported, residents who ignored the mandatory evacuation order (thinking 'Katrina...had all the makings of a flop') quickly found themselves surrounded by bloated corpses floating in toxic floodwaters and without a consolidated rescue effort. Horne quickly moves past the melodrama of a striking disaster to recount the stories of individuals caught in the storm's hellish aftermath or mired in the government's hamstrung response: a Louisiana State University climatologist goes head-to-head with the Army Corps of Engineers over inadequate flood protection and faulty levees; a former Black Panther provides emergency health care at a local mosque. Horne saves his sharpest barbs for President Bush and the Department of Homeland Security ('if Homeland Security...was what stood between America and the next 9/11, then...America was in deep trouble') for failing to muster an appropriate response. Big disasters spawn big books, and though Horne's isn't the definitive account, it's an honest, angry and wrenching response to a massively bungled catastrophe." Publishers Weekly(Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Author Jed Horne takes a correct approach with these subjects and issues....Horne doesn't seem to have any recommendations for regular people like us. It's not that kind of book. It is instead a book that excels when it is chronicling Americans left to rot in sewer tides, dodge snakes and starve in chaos."
"Review" by , "Horne's ability to flesh out the human dimension of the drama is his very real strength."
"Review" by , "[Horne] offers something different to the dialogue, something even worth reading....Breach of Faith is not a book about politics, or about blame, but is most powerful when Horne's honest, rarely angry writing assesses the bureaucratic incompetence and failure that compounded the hurricane's mess."
"Review" by , "A heart-wrenching chronicle of nature's wrath and the human condition."
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