Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 5, 2014

    William Gibson: IMG William Gibson: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$2.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Recovery and Addiction- Personal Stories

My Friend Leonard

by

My Friend Leonard Cover

ISBN13: 9781573223157
ISBN10: 1573223158
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $2.50!

 

Review-A-Day

"Frey is at his best with dialogue; it is through these tart exchanges that he builds likeable, distinct characters. But too much of My Friend Leonard is dull, repetitive monologue. Frey's habit of stringing adjectives together...and his tendency to run two sentences into one...give his writing a sketchy, imprecise feel." Anna Godbersen, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Perhaps the most unconventional and literally breathtaking father-son story you'll ever read, My Friend Leonard pulls you immediately and deeply into a relationship as unusual as it is inspiring.

The father figure is Leonard, the high-living, recovering coke addict "West Coast Director of a large Italian-American finance firm" (read: mobster) who helped to keep James Frey clean in A Million Little Pieces. The son is, of course, James, damaged perhaps beyond repair by years of crack and alcohol addiction-and by more than a few cruel tricks of fate.

James embarks on his post-rehab existence in Chicago emotionally devastated, broke, and afraid to get close to other people. But then Leonard comes back into his life, and everything changes. Leonard offers his "son" lucrative — if illegal and slightly dangerous — employment. He teaches James to enjoy life, sober, for the first time. He instructs him in the art of "living boldly," pushes him to pursue his passion for writing, and provides a watchful and supportive veil of protection under which James can get his life together. Both Leonard's and James's careers flourish... but then Leonard vanishes. When the reasons behind his mysterious absence are revealed, the book opens up in unexpected emotional ways.

My Friend Leonard showcases a brilliant and energetic young writer rising to important new challenges-displaying surprising warmth, humor, and maturity — without losing his intensity. This book proves that one of the most provocative literary voices of his generation is also one of the most emphatically human.

Review:

"Frey achieves another stylistic coup as he develops a narrative thread begun in 2003's A Million Little Pieces. He chronicles his journey out of the terrifying darkness of addiction, and the friend he meets along the way, Leonard. A gangster, raconteur and mentor, Leonard was introduced in Pieces as one of Frey's new rehab friends. Here, he pushes Frey out into the world, pampering him one moment, giving him tough love the next. As in Pieces, Frey's style throughout is loose, untraditional yet perfectly crafted: '[Leonard] offered me his hand and said good, I'm fucked up too, and I like fucked-up people, let's sit and eat and see if we can be friends. I took his hand and I shook it and we sat down and we ate together and we became friends.' There's something mesmerizing about the endless tumble of words, the nonstop spilling out of Frey's troubles and triumphs. In the hands of a less capable writer, all of this cool, tight narration might numb the reader and distance the experience. Instead, this book packs a full-body emotional wallop. Frey's eye is keen for detail: the inside of a county lockup; the flat, gray Chicago winter; an out-of-control Super Bowl party in Los Angeles; the grind of living day to day — all come alive in his sparse, powerful prose. At its core, this is an examination of a friendship. Frey's extraordinary relationship with Leonard is alive, a flesh-and-blood bond forged in the agony of rehab and sustained through honesty and trust. Agent, Kassie Evashevski at Brillstein/Grey Entertainment. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The book is a gruesome, unpretentious and utterly convincing tale of recovery....[W]hat matters in Frey's work is the truth of his condition and his struggle to tell that truth. When writing about the self-loathing and horror of addiction, he is the best I have read." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"In My Friend Leonard, James Frey describes adjusting to life without [a] protective blanket. The effect is vivid, splashy, mesmerizing. Indeed, he has put the Technicolor back into memoir." Minneapolis Star Tribune

Review:

"Reading My Friend Leonard can feel a little like being cornered at a party, someone pouring their heart out to you, lifting up their shirt and showing you their scars, and all the time you're wondering: When can I escape and get a drink?" Newsday

Review:

"While this memoir addresses serious issues that would ostensibly interest readers (love and loss, suicide, sexual orientation, AIDS, and criminal activity), Frey's writing style utterly fails to engage." Library Journal

Review:

"[A] raw, often visceral, reading experience. With Frey's emotions so close to the surface, it's impossible not to care about Frey's struggles to reintegrate into society and prosper. Another powerful read from a talented, dynamic author." Booklist (Starred Review)

Synopsis:

From the author of the bestselling A Million Little Pieces comes the story of his friendship with a highly unorthodox father figure, the high-living, recovering coke addict, "West Coast Director of a large Italian-American finance firm" (read: mobster).

Synopsis:

Perhaps the most unconventional and literally breathtaking father-son story you'll ever read, My Friend Leonard pulls you immediately and deeply into a relationship as unusual as it is inspiring.

The father figure is Leonard, the high-living, recovering coke addict "West Coast Director of a large Italian-American finance firm" (read: mobster) who helped to keep James Frey clean in A Million Little Pieces. The son is, of course, James, damaged perhaps beyond repair by years of crack and alcohol addiction-and by more than a few cruel tricks of fate.

James embarks on his post-rehab existence in Chicago emotionally devastated, broke, and afraid to get close to other people. But then Leonard comes back into his life, and everything changes. Leonard offers his "son" lucrative—if illegal and slightly dangerous—employment. He teaches James to enjoy life, sober, for the first time. He instructs him in the art of "living boldly," pushes him to pursue his passion for writing, and provides a watchful and supportive veil of protection under which James can get his life together. Both Leonard's and James's careers flourish…but then Leonard vanishes. When the reasons behind his mysterious absence are revealed, the book opens up in unexpected emotional ways.

My Friend Leonard showcases a brilliant and energetic young writer rising to important new challenges—displaying surprising warmth, humor, and maturity—without losing his intensity. This book proves that one of the most provocative literary voices of his generation is also one of the most emphatically human.

About the Author

James Frey is the author of the memoir A Million Little Pieces.

Author photo by Annelore Van Herjiwen

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Shorty Girl, March 28, 2007 (view all comments by Shorty Girl)
This book is an awsum book but a million little pieces was a true and helpful book becuase it help me to stop using drugs as much as i was on them i've been addicted to drugs since i was 16 and it is hard to get off them because thats all u wanna do i know i was even on the in school everyday and i didn't want that it was hard to look at myself ever morning and telling myself just another day of drugs but now that i am reading this book it helps me to not think about drugs and i think every morning that i'm getting up to a beautiful day and i get to read a little bit more of this book and that helps me I just think that he should write more books about him seld because there are alot of people that really like him for his books. i know of about 20 people that want him to write more and that a great thing to hear because i'm not the only one that likes his books. so for this book i put a 3 but for a million little pieces there really wouldn't be a rate i could put it because it was a REALLY good book. anyways thats what i had to type so thank you for this opportunity and to James Frey THANK YOU FOR WRITING THAT BOOK.....:)
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
tabithastar20, February 22, 2007 (view all comments by tabithastar20)
In, my opion this book was pretty good. I really like A million little peices better. I like where he writes from is heart. He tells you how he overcame his addiction. For, a person to tell their story on their addiciton is really hard. I couldn't imagine telling people what I had went through and how hard it was. He also told people about how he wanted to commit suicide. He was a really fucked up person, and he now has overcome that. The best part is that he admits how fucked up he was.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(15 of 21 readers found this comment helpful)
mbsommer2002, June 19, 2006 (view all comments by mbsommer2002)
My Friend Leonard was a remarkable book. I read it in a day and could not put it down. I think it gives a very true story about a person who hit a true rock bottom and had the strength and courage to get his life back. James and Leonard share a true friendship and help each other with lifes struggles and they develop a true father/ son type relationship. One of the best books I have ever read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(15 of 22 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781573223157
Author:
Frey, James
Publisher:
Riverhead Trade
Subject:
Recovering addicts
Subject:
Male friendship
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts - General
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20060530
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.42x6.74x1.17 in. 1.26 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. Another Bullshit Night in Suck City:...
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  2. Go Ask Alice
    Used Mass Market $2.95
  3. Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to...
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  4. Classic Starts: The Secret Garden... New Hardcover $6.95
  5. The Last of the Mohicans (Stepping... Used Trade Paper $3.00
  6. Sign of the Beaver Used Mass Market $1.95

Related Subjects

Biography » Entertainment and Performing Arts
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Drug and Alcohol Addiction
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Personal Stories

My Friend Leonard Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Riverhead Books - English 9781573223157 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Frey achieves another stylistic coup as he develops a narrative thread begun in 2003's A Million Little Pieces. He chronicles his journey out of the terrifying darkness of addiction, and the friend he meets along the way, Leonard. A gangster, raconteur and mentor, Leonard was introduced in Pieces as one of Frey's new rehab friends. Here, he pushes Frey out into the world, pampering him one moment, giving him tough love the next. As in Pieces, Frey's style throughout is loose, untraditional yet perfectly crafted: '[Leonard] offered me his hand and said good, I'm fucked up too, and I like fucked-up people, let's sit and eat and see if we can be friends. I took his hand and I shook it and we sat down and we ate together and we became friends.' There's something mesmerizing about the endless tumble of words, the nonstop spilling out of Frey's troubles and triumphs. In the hands of a less capable writer, all of this cool, tight narration might numb the reader and distance the experience. Instead, this book packs a full-body emotional wallop. Frey's eye is keen for detail: the inside of a county lockup; the flat, gray Chicago winter; an out-of-control Super Bowl party in Los Angeles; the grind of living day to day — all come alive in his sparse, powerful prose. At its core, this is an examination of a friendship. Frey's extraordinary relationship with Leonard is alive, a flesh-and-blood bond forged in the agony of rehab and sustained through honesty and trust. Agent, Kassie Evashevski at Brillstein/Grey Entertainment. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "Frey is at his best with dialogue; it is through these tart exchanges that he builds likeable, distinct characters. But too much of My Friend Leonard is dull, repetitive monologue. Frey's habit of stringing adjectives together...and his tendency to run two sentences into one...give his writing a sketchy, imprecise feel." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "The book is a gruesome, unpretentious and utterly convincing tale of recovery....[W]hat matters in Frey's work is the truth of his condition and his struggle to tell that truth. When writing about the self-loathing and horror of addiction, he is the best I have read."
"Review" by , "In My Friend Leonard, James Frey describes adjusting to life without [a] protective blanket. The effect is vivid, splashy, mesmerizing. Indeed, he has put the Technicolor back into memoir."
"Review" by , "Reading My Friend Leonard can feel a little like being cornered at a party, someone pouring their heart out to you, lifting up their shirt and showing you their scars, and all the time you're wondering: When can I escape and get a drink?"
"Review" by , "While this memoir addresses serious issues that would ostensibly interest readers (love and loss, suicide, sexual orientation, AIDS, and criminal activity), Frey's writing style utterly fails to engage."
"Review" by , "[A] raw, often visceral, reading experience. With Frey's emotions so close to the surface, it's impossible not to care about Frey's struggles to reintegrate into society and prosper. Another powerful read from a talented, dynamic author."
"Synopsis" by , From the author of the bestselling A Million Little Pieces comes the story of his friendship with a highly unorthodox father figure, the high-living, recovering coke addict, "West Coast Director of a large Italian-American finance firm" (read: mobster).
"Synopsis" by ,

Perhaps the most unconventional and literally breathtaking father-son story you'll ever read, My Friend Leonard pulls you immediately and deeply into a relationship as unusual as it is inspiring.

The father figure is Leonard, the high-living, recovering coke addict "West Coast Director of a large Italian-American finance firm" (read: mobster) who helped to keep James Frey clean in A Million Little Pieces. The son is, of course, James, damaged perhaps beyond repair by years of crack and alcohol addiction-and by more than a few cruel tricks of fate.

James embarks on his post-rehab existence in Chicago emotionally devastated, broke, and afraid to get close to other people. But then Leonard comes back into his life, and everything changes. Leonard offers his "son" lucrative—if illegal and slightly dangerous—employment. He teaches James to enjoy life, sober, for the first time. He instructs him in the art of "living boldly," pushes him to pursue his passion for writing, and provides a watchful and supportive veil of protection under which James can get his life together. Both Leonard's and James's careers flourish…but then Leonard vanishes. When the reasons behind his mysterious absence are revealed, the book opens up in unexpected emotional ways.

My Friend Leonard showcases a brilliant and energetic young writer rising to important new challenges—displaying surprising warmth, humor, and maturity—without losing his intensity. This book proves that one of the most provocative literary voices of his generation is also one of the most emphatically human.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.