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How We Got Here : Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets (05 Edition)

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Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Best-selling author Andy Kessler ties up the loose ends from his provocative book, Running Money, with this history of breakthrough technology and the markets that funded them.

Expanding on themes first raised in his tour de force, Running Money, Andy Kessler unpacks the entire history of Silicon Valley and Wall Street, from the Industrial Revolution to computers, communications, money, gold and stock markets. These stories cut (by an unscrupulous editor) from the original manuscript were intended as a primer on the ways in which new technologies develop from unprofitable curiosities to essential investments. Indeed, How We Got Here is the book Kessler wishes someone had handed him on his first day as a freshman engineering student at Cornell or on the day he started on Wall Street. This book connects the dots through history to how we got to where we are today.

Review:

"This pasted-together romp through 300-odd years of technological advancement and financial development reads as it is billed: material cut from the manuscript of Kessler's 2004 book, Running Money. Per the brief foreword, Kessler's aim is to provide a list of 'five simple creeds' that have helped him 'explain the explainable' and 'peer into the fog of the future': lower prices drive wealth; intelligence moves to the edge of the network; horizontal beats vertical; capital sloshes around seeking its highest return; and the military drives commerce and vice versa. His proof is delivered in a whirlwind tour of the industrial and digital revolutions. The first half of the book is a game of hopscotch through the Industrial Revolution and the evolution of early capital markets. The second half tells the story of the computer era and the growth of today's capital markets. Sandwiched between the two is an oddly abbreviated two-chapter section, 10 pages in all, that covers the development of the telegraph, telephone and power generation. Kessler returns to his 'simple creeds' here and there, but the only real unifying force is hokey, techy wisecracks. The result is rehashed history often bewilderingly unconnected in theme and chronology, though many individual anecdotes are well told. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Kessler presents an accessibly written history of breakthrough technologies and the markets that funded them. Expanding on themes raised in his previous book, Running Money, he explains how technologies such as the steam engine, the telephone, and the Global Positioning System developed from unprofitable curiosities into essential investments. Kessler is a former electrical engineer and Wall Street analyst.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Kessler presents an accessibly written history of breakthrough technologies and the markets that funded them. Expanding on themes raised in his previous book, Running Money, he explains how technologies such as the steam engine, the telephone, and the Global Positioning System developed from unprofitable curiosities into essential investments. Kessler is a former electrical engineer and Wall Street analyst. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

About the Author

After turning $100 million into $1 billion riding the technology wave of the late 1990s, Andy Kessler recounted his experiences on Wall Street and in the trenches of the hedge fund industry in the books Wall Street Meat and Running Money (and its companion volume, How We Got Here). Though he has retired from actively managing other people's money, he remains a passionate and curious investor. Unable to keep his many opinions to himself, he contributes to the Wall Street Journal, Wired, and lots of Web sites on a variety of Wall Street and technology-related topics, and is often seen on CNBC, FOX, and CNN. He lives in Silicon Valley like all the other tech guys.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060840976
Subtitle:
A Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets
Author:
Kessler, Andy
Author:
by Andy Kessler
Publisher:
HarperBusiness
Subject:
Technological innovations
Subject:
Industries - Computer Industry
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - Strategies
Subject:
Industries - Media & Communications Industries
Subject:
Investments & Securities
Subject:
Capital market - Technological innovations
Subject:
Business-History and Biography
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
20050614
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.94x5.40x.67 in. .45 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Business » Communication
Business » General
Business » History and Biographies
Business » Reference
Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

How We Got Here : Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets (05 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 272 pages Collins - English 9780060840976 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This pasted-together romp through 300-odd years of technological advancement and financial development reads as it is billed: material cut from the manuscript of Kessler's 2004 book, Running Money. Per the brief foreword, Kessler's aim is to provide a list of 'five simple creeds' that have helped him 'explain the explainable' and 'peer into the fog of the future': lower prices drive wealth; intelligence moves to the edge of the network; horizontal beats vertical; capital sloshes around seeking its highest return; and the military drives commerce and vice versa. His proof is delivered in a whirlwind tour of the industrial and digital revolutions. The first half of the book is a game of hopscotch through the Industrial Revolution and the evolution of early capital markets. The second half tells the story of the computer era and the growth of today's capital markets. Sandwiched between the two is an oddly abbreviated two-chapter section, 10 pages in all, that covers the development of the telegraph, telephone and power generation. Kessler returns to his 'simple creeds' here and there, but the only real unifying force is hokey, techy wisecracks. The result is rehashed history often bewilderingly unconnected in theme and chronology, though many individual anecdotes are well told. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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