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How To Read a Film: the World of Movies, Media, Multimedia: Language, History, Theory. 30TH Anniversary Edition (Rev 09 Edition)

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How To Read a Film: the World of Movies, Media, Multimedia: Language, History, Theory. 30TH Anniversary Edition (Rev 09 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Richard Gilman referred to How to Read a Film as simply "the best single work of its kind." And Janet Maslin in The New York Times Book Review marveled at James Monaco's ability to collect "an enormous amount of useful information and assemble it in an exhilaratingly simple and systematic way." Indeed, since its original publication in 1977, this hugely popular book has become the definitive source on film and media.

Now, James Monaco offers a special anniversary edition of his classic work, featuring a new preface and several new sections, including an "Essential Library: One Hundred Books About Film and Media You Should Read" and "One Hundred Films You Should See." As in previous editions, Monaco once again looks at film from many vantage points, as both art and craft, sensibility and science, tradition and technology. After examining film's close relation to other narrative media such as the novel, painting, photography, television, and even music, the book discusses the elements necessary to understand how films convey meaning, and, more importantly, how we can best discern all that a film is attempting to communicate. In addition, Monaco stresses the still-evolving digital context of film throughout--one of the new sections looks at the untrustworthy nature of digital images and sound--and his chapter on multimedia brings media criticism into the twenty-first century with a thorough discussion of topics like virtual reality, cyberspace, and the proximity of both to film.

With hundreds of illustrative black-and-white film stills and diagrams, How to Read a Film is an indispensable addition to the library of everyone who loves the cinema and wants to understand it better.

Synopsis:

In this engaging account, Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who not only helped shape Hollywoodand#8217;s representation of Indigenous peoples but also, through their very participation, complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples in film. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. As such, these films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. Films with genuinely Indigenous plots and subplots, however, clearly attest a different aspect of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as invisible or separate.

In Reservation Reelism, Rahejaand#160;traces positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.

Synopsis:

Navajo Talking Picture, released in 1985, is one of the earliest and most controversial works of Native cinema. It is a documentary by Los Angeles filmmaker Arlene Bowman, who travels to the Navajo reservation to record the traditional ways of her grandmother in order to understand her own cultural heritage. For reasons that have often confused viewers, the filmmaker persists despite her traditional grandmotherand#8217;s forceful objections to the apparent invasion of her privacy. What emerges is a strange and thought-provoking work that abruptly calls into question the issue of insider versus outsider and other assumptions that have obscured the complexities of Native art.

Randolph Lewis offers an insightful introduction and analysis of Navajo Talking Picture, in which he shows that it is not simply the first Navajo-produced film but also a path-breaking work in the history of indigenous media in the United States. Placing the film in a number of revealing contexts, including the long history of Navajo people working in Hollywood, the ethics of documentary filmmaking, and the often problematic reception of Native art, Lewis explores the tensions and mysteries hidden in this unsettling but fascinating film.

About the Author

James Monaco is a writer, publisher, and producer. His books include American Film Now, The New Wave, The Encyclopedia of Film, and The Connoisseur's Guide to the Movies. He lives and works in the New York City area.

Table of Contents

Introduction

I. Film as Art

The Nature of Art

Ways of Looking at Art

Film, Recording, and the Other Arts

The Structure of Art

II. Technology: Image and Sound

Art and Technology

The Lens

The Camera

The Filmstock

The Soudtrack

Post-Production

Video and Film

Projection

III. The Language of Film: Signs and Syntax

Signs

Syntax

IV. The Shape of Film History

Movies/Film/Cinema

"Movies": Economics

"Film": Politics

"Cinema": Aesthetics

V. Film Theory: Form and Function

The Critic

The Poet and the Philosopher: Lindsay and Munsterberg

Expressionism and Realism: Arnheim and Kracauer

Montage: Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balazs, and Formalism

Mise en Scene: Neorealism, Bazin, and Godard

Film Speaks and Acts: Metz and Contemporary Theory

VI. Media: The Middle of Things

Community

Print and Electronic Media

The Technology of Mechanical and Electronic Media

Radio and Records

Television and Video

VII. Multimedia: The Digital Revolution

The Digital Revolution

The Myth of Multimedia

The Myth of Virtual Reality

The Myth of Cyberspace

"What is to be Done?"

Film and Media: A Chronology

Reading About Film and Media

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195321050
Author:
Monaco, James
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Illustrator:
Lindroth, David
Author:
Lewis, Randolph
Author:
Raheja, Michelle H.
Author:
null, James
Subject:
Film & Video - History & Criticism
Subject:
Communication | Film and Television Studies
Subject:
Film - History & Criticism
Subject:
Motion pictures
Subject:
Communication | Film
Subject:
Television Studies
Subject:
Film, Media,
Subject:
Performing Arts | Film Studies
Subject:
Film, Media, & Performing Arts | Film Studies
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Subject:
Native American Studies
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Indigenous Films
Publication Date:
20090531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
14 illustrations
Pages:
358
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Style and Design
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Film History and Theory
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » General
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Children's » Activities » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

How To Read a Film: the World of Movies, Media, Multimedia: Language, History, Theory. 30TH Anniversary Edition (Rev 09 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 358 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195321050 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this engaging account, Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who not only helped shape Hollywoodand#8217;s representation of Indigenous peoples but also, through their very participation, complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples in film. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. As such, these films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. Films with genuinely Indigenous plots and subplots, however, clearly attest a different aspect of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as invisible or separate.

In Reservation Reelism, Rahejaand#160;traces positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.

"Synopsis" by ,
Navajo Talking Picture, released in 1985, is one of the earliest and most controversial works of Native cinema. It is a documentary by Los Angeles filmmaker Arlene Bowman, who travels to the Navajo reservation to record the traditional ways of her grandmother in order to understand her own cultural heritage. For reasons that have often confused viewers, the filmmaker persists despite her traditional grandmotherand#8217;s forceful objections to the apparent invasion of her privacy. What emerges is a strange and thought-provoking work that abruptly calls into question the issue of insider versus outsider and other assumptions that have obscured the complexities of Native art.

Randolph Lewis offers an insightful introduction and analysis of Navajo Talking Picture, in which he shows that it is not simply the first Navajo-produced film but also a path-breaking work in the history of indigenous media in the United States. Placing the film in a number of revealing contexts, including the long history of Navajo people working in Hollywood, the ethics of documentary filmmaking, and the often problematic reception of Native art, Lewis explores the tensions and mysteries hidden in this unsettling but fascinating film.

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