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Human Rights Revolution (12 Edition)

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Human Rights Revolution (12 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

The third volume for the OUP/National History Center series, Reinterpreting History, this book offers a critical look at the political movement encompassed by human rights, a term rarely used before the 1940s. An agenda for human rights, with particular attention to international justice in the wake of crimes against humanity, women's rights, indigenous rights, the right to health care, all developed in the second half of the 20th century. Drawing on the work of legal scholars, political scientists, journalists, activists, and historians, human rights as a field of research has been characterized by analysis of natural rights, study of key documents like the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, discussion of activism and NGOs, and analysis of rhetoric. This volume will take a case study approach that will shed light on different perspectives, methodologies, and conceptualizations for the study of human rights history.

The contributors to this volume look at the wave of human rights legislation emerging out of World War II, including the UN Declaration of Human Rights, the Nuremberg trial, and the Geneva Conventions, and the flowering of human rights activity in the 1970s and beyond, including anti-torture campaigns and Amnesty International, Indonesia and East Timor, international scientists and human rights, and female genital mutilation. The book concludes with a look at the UN Declaration at its 60th anniversary. Together the group of renowned senior and junior scholars create a volume that can introduce students from a range of disciplines to this topic, as well as offer new perspectives for scholars.

Synopsis:

Between the Second World War and the early 1970s, political leaders, activists, citizens, protestors. and freedom fighters triggered a human rights revolution in world affairs. Stimulated particularly by the horrors of the crimes against humanity in the 1940s, the human rights revolution grew rapidly to subsume claims from minorities, women, the politically oppressed, and marginal communities across the globe. The human rights revolution began with a disarmingly simple idea: that every individual, whatever his or her nationality, political beliefs, or ethnic and religious heritage, possesses an inviolable right to be treated with dignity. From this basic claim grew many more, and ever since, the cascading effect of these initial rights claims has dramatically shaped world history down to our own times.

The contributors to this volume look at the wave of human rights legislation emerging out of World War II, including the UN Declaration of Human Rights, the Nuremberg trial, and the Geneva Conventions, and the expansion of human rights activity in the 1970s and beyond, including the anti-torture campaigns of Amnesty International, human rights politics in Indonesia and East Timor, the emergence of a human rights agenda among international scientists, and the global campaign female genital mutilation. The book concludes with a look at the UN Declaration at its 60th anniversary. Bringing together renowned senior scholars with a new generation of international historians, these essays set an ambitious agenda for the history of human rights.

About the Author

Charles Warren Research Professor of American History, Emeritus, Harvard University. Author of China and Japan in the Global Setting (1992), The Globalizing of America (1993), and Cultural Internationalism and World Order (1997), among other titles.

Table of Contents

Contributors

Introduction: Human Rights as History, by Akira Iriye and Petra Goedde

Part I: The Human Rights Revolution

1. Kenneth J. Cmiel, The Recent History of Human Rights

2. G. Daniel Cohen, The Holocaust and the "Human Rights Revolution": A Reassessment

3. Elizabeth Borgwardt, "Constitutionalizing" Human Rights: The Rise of the Nuremberg Principles

4. William I. Hitchcock: Human Rights and the Laws of War: The Geneva Conventions of 1949

5. Atina Grossmann, Grams, Calories, and Food: Languages of Victimization, Entitlement, and Human Rights in Occupied Germany 1945-1949

6. Allida Black, Are Women 'Human'? The U.N. and the Struggle to Recognize Women's Rights as Human Rights

Part II. The Globalization of Human Rights History

7. Samuel Moyn, Imperialism, Self-Determination, and the Rise of Human Rights

8. Brad Simpson, 'The First Right':The Carter Administration, Indonesia and the Transnational Human Rights Politics of the 1970s

9. Barbara Keys, Anti-Torture Politics: Amnesty International, the Greek Junta, and the Origins of the Human Rights 'Boom' in the United States

10. Carl J. Bon Tempo, From the Center-Right: Freedom House and Human Rights in the 1970s and 1980s

11. Paul Rubinson, "For Our Soviet Colleagues": Scientific Internationalism, Human Rights and the Cold War

12. Sarah B. Snyder, "Principles Overwhelming Tanks": Human Rights and the End of the Cold War

13. Kelly J. Shannon, The Right to Bodily Integrity: Women's Rights as Human Rights and the International Movement to End Female Genital Mutilation, 1970s-1990s

14. Alexis Dudden, Is History a Human Right? Japan and Korea's Troubles with the Past

15. Mark Philip Bradley, Approaching the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195333145
Author:
Iriye, Akira
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
Hitchcock, William I.
Author:
Goedde, Petra
Subject:
Human Rights
Subject:
History - Other
Subject:
Politics-United States Politics
Subject:
Politics-Human Rights
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
6.2 x 9.2 x 0.9 in 1.05 lb

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
Languages » ESL » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » Electricity » General Electronics
Textbooks » General

Human Rights Revolution (12 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 368 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195333145 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Between the Second World War and the early 1970s, political leaders, activists, citizens, protestors. and freedom fighters triggered a human rights revolution in world affairs. Stimulated particularly by the horrors of the crimes against humanity in the 1940s, the human rights revolution grew rapidly to subsume claims from minorities, women, the politically oppressed, and marginal communities across the globe. The human rights revolution began with a disarmingly simple idea: that every individual, whatever his or her nationality, political beliefs, or ethnic and religious heritage, possesses an inviolable right to be treated with dignity. From this basic claim grew many more, and ever since, the cascading effect of these initial rights claims has dramatically shaped world history down to our own times.

The contributors to this volume look at the wave of human rights legislation emerging out of World War II, including the UN Declaration of Human Rights, the Nuremberg trial, and the Geneva Conventions, and the expansion of human rights activity in the 1970s and beyond, including the anti-torture campaigns of Amnesty International, human rights politics in Indonesia and East Timor, the emergence of a human rights agenda among international scientists, and the global campaign female genital mutilation. The book concludes with a look at the UN Declaration at its 60th anniversary. Bringing together renowned senior scholars with a new generation of international historians, these essays set an ambitious agenda for the history of human rights.

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