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Cultural Strategy: Using Innovative Ideologies to Build Breakthrough Brands

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Cultural Strategy: Using Innovative Ideologies to Build Breakthrough Brands Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Market innovation has long been dominated by the worldview of engineers and economists--build a better mousetrap and the world will take notice. The most influential strategy books--such as Competing for the Future, The Innovator's Dilemma, and Blue Ocean Strategy--argue that innovation should focus on breakthrough functionality.

Holt and Cameron challenge this conventional wisdom. They develop a cultural approach to innovation: champion a better ideology and the world will take notice. The authors use detailed historical analyses of the take-offs of Nike, vitaminwater, Marlboro, Starbucks, Jack Daniel's, Levi's, ESPN, and Ben and Jerry's to build a powerful new theory. They show how brands in mature categories come to rely upon similar conventional brand expressions, leading to what the authors call a cultural orthodoxy. Historical changes in society threaten this orthodoxy by creating demand for new culture. Cultural innovations draw upon source material--novel cultural content lurking in subcultures, social movements, and the media--to develop brands that respond to this emerging demand, leapfrogging entrenched incumbents. The authors demonstrate how they have adapted this theory into a step-by-step cultural strategy model, which they successfully applied to start-ups (Fat Tire beer), consumer technologies (Clearblue pregnancy tests), under-funded challengers (Fuse Music Television), and social enterprises (Freelancers Union). Holt and Cameron conclude by explaining why top marketing companies fail at cultural innovation. Using careful organizational research, the authors demonstrate that companies are trapped in the brand bureaucracy, which systematically derails innovation. Cultural innovation requires a new organizational logic. In all of their cases, the authors find that the cultural innovators have rejected the brand bureaucracy.

Written by one of the leading authorities on brands and marketing in the world today, Cultural Strategy transforms what has always been treated as the "intuitive" side of branding into a systematic strategic discipline.

Synopsis:

How do we explain the breakthrough market success of businesses like Nike, Starbucks, Ben and Jerry's, and Jack Daniel's? Conventional models of strategy and innovation simply don't work. The most influential ideas on innovation are shaped by the worldview of engineers and economists - build a better mousetrap and the world will take notice. Holt and Cameron challenge this conventional wisdom and take an entirely different approach: champion a better ideology and the world will take notice as well. Holt and Cameron build a powerful new theory of cultural innovation. Brands in mature categories get locked into a form of cultural mimicry, what the authors call a cultural orthodoxy. Historical changes in society create demand for new culture - ideological opportunities that upend this orthodoxy. Cultural innovations repurpose cultural content lurking in subcultures to respond to this emerging demand, leapfrogging entrenched incumbents.

Cultural Strategy guides managers and entrepreneurs on how to leverage ideological opportunities:

- How managers can use culture to out-innovate their competitors

- How entrepreneurs can identify new market opportunities that big companies miss

- How underfunded challengers can win against category Goliaths

- How technology businesses can avoid commoditization

- How social entrepreneurs can develop businesses that appeal to more than just fellow activists

- How subcultural brands can break out of the 'cultural chasm' to mass market success

- How global brands can pursue cross-cultural strategies to succeed in local markets

- How organizations can maximize their innovation capabilities by avoiding the brand bureaucracy trap

Written by leading authorities on branding in the world today, along with one of the advertising industry's leading visionaries, Cultural Strategy transforms what has always been treated as the "intuitive" side of market innovation into a systematic strategic discipline.

About the Author

Douglas Holt is Professor of Marketing at the University of Oxford. He is editor of the Journal of Consumer Culture and author of the bestseller How Brands Become Icons: The Principles of Cultural Branding.

Douglas Cameron is President of The Cultural Strategy Group.

Table of Contents

1. Rethinking Blue Oceans

Section I: Cultural Innovation Theory

2. Nike: New Motivational Instruction for Achieving the American Dream

3. Jack Daniel's: Mythologizing the Company as Reactionary Hotbed of Hillbilly Frontiersmen

4. Ben and Jerry's: Provoking Ideological Flashpoints to Create a Sustainable Business Myth

5. Starbucks: Trickling Down Cultural Capital to Create an Artismopolitan Myth

6. Vitaminwater: Creating a "Better Mousetrap" with myth

7. Marlboro: Selecting the Right Cultural Codes to Craft a Reactionary Work Myth

8. Cultural Innovation Theory

Section II: Applying the Cultural Strategy Model

9. Clearblue Easy: Using Cultural Strategy in Technology-Driven Categories

10. Fat Tire Beer: Using Cultural Strategy to Cross an Ideological Chasm

11. FUSE Music Television: Using Cultural Strategy to Challenge a Dominant Incumbent

12. Freelancers Union: Using Cultural Strategy for Social Entrepreneurship

Section III: Organizing for Cultural Innovation: The Brand Bureaucracy vs. The Cultural Studio

13. The Brand Bureaucracy and the Rise of Sciency Marketing

14. The Cultural Studio Forms Underground: LEVI'S 501s in Europe

15. The Cultural Studio Forms Above Ground: ESPN

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199587407
Author:
Holt, Douglas
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
null, Douglas
Author:
Cameron, Douglas
Subject:
General
Subject:
Strategic planning
Subject:
Systems & Planning
Subject:
Business | Management | Marketing Management
Subject:
business, business plans
Publication Date:
20101231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
6.4 x 9.3 x 1.1 in 1.6 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Plans
Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Marketing
History and Social Science » World History » General

Cultural Strategy: Using Innovative Ideologies to Build Breakthrough Brands New Hardcover
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Product details 408 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199587407 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How do we explain the breakthrough market success of businesses like Nike, Starbucks, Ben and Jerry's, and Jack Daniel's? Conventional models of strategy and innovation simply don't work. The most influential ideas on innovation are shaped by the worldview of engineers and economists - build a better mousetrap and the world will take notice. Holt and Cameron challenge this conventional wisdom and take an entirely different approach: champion a better ideology and the world will take notice as well. Holt and Cameron build a powerful new theory of cultural innovation. Brands in mature categories get locked into a form of cultural mimicry, what the authors call a cultural orthodoxy. Historical changes in society create demand for new culture - ideological opportunities that upend this orthodoxy. Cultural innovations repurpose cultural content lurking in subcultures to respond to this emerging demand, leapfrogging entrenched incumbents.

Cultural Strategy guides managers and entrepreneurs on how to leverage ideological opportunities:

- How managers can use culture to out-innovate their competitors

- How entrepreneurs can identify new market opportunities that big companies miss

- How underfunded challengers can win against category Goliaths

- How technology businesses can avoid commoditization

- How social entrepreneurs can develop businesses that appeal to more than just fellow activists

- How subcultural brands can break out of the 'cultural chasm' to mass market success

- How global brands can pursue cross-cultural strategies to succeed in local markets

- How organizations can maximize their innovation capabilities by avoiding the brand bureaucracy trap

Written by leading authorities on branding in the world today, along with one of the advertising industry's leading visionaries, Cultural Strategy transforms what has always been treated as the "intuitive" side of market innovation into a systematic strategic discipline.

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