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How the Beatles Destroyed Rock'n'roll (11 Edition)

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How the Beatles Destroyed Rock'n'roll (11 Edition) Cover

ISBN13: 9780199756971
ISBN10: 019975697x
Condition: Student Owned
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Publisher Comments:

Overthrowing the conventional pieties of mainstream jazz and rock history, Elijah Wald traces the evolution of popular music through developing tastes, trends and technologies--including the role of records, radio, jukeboxes and television--to give a fuller, more balanced account of the broad variety of music that captivated listeners over the course of the twentieth century.

Wald revisits original sources--recordings, period articles, memoirs, and interviews--to highlight how music was actually heard and experienced over the years. In a refreshing departure from more typical histories, he focuses on the world of working musicians and ordinary listeners rather than stars and specialists. He looks at the evolution of jazz as dance music, and rock 'n' roll through the eyes of the screaming, twisting teenage girls who made up the bulk of its early audience. Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and the Beatles are all here, but Wald also discusses less familiar names like Paul Whiteman, Guy Lombardo, Mitch Miller, Jo Stafford, Frankie Avalon, and the Shirelles, who in some cases were far more popular than those bright stars we all know today, and who more accurately represent the mainstream of their times.

"Wald's book is suave, soulful, ebullient and will blow out your speakers."

--Tom Waits

"Wald is a meticulous researcher, a graceful writer and a committed contrarian.... An impressive accomplishment."

--Peter Keepnews, New York Times Book Review

"One of those rare books that aims to upend received wisdom and actually succeeds."

--Kirkus Reviews

"It is as an alternative, corrective history of American music that Wald's book is invaluable. It forces us to see that only by studying the good with the bad--and by seeing that the good and bad can't be pulled apart--can we truly grasp the greatness of our cultural legacy."

--Malcolm Jones, Newsweek

"Wald wears his scholarship lightly, but his ideas and insights are substantial.... The attention-grabbing title, for all its counterintuitive appeal, gives scant indication of the book's ambitions and achievements."

--David Suisman, The Sixties

Synopsis:

"There are no definitive histories," writes Elijah Wald, in this provocative reassessment of American popular music, "because the past keeps looking different as the present changes." Earlier musical styles sound different to us today because we hear them through the musical filter of other styles that came after them, all the way through funk and hip hop.

As its blasphemous title suggests, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll rejects the conventional pieties of mainstream jazz and rock history. Rather than concentrating on those traditionally favored styles, the book traces the evolution of popular music through developing tastes, trends and technologies--including the role of records, radio, jukeboxes and television --to give a fuller, more balanced account of the broad variety of music that captivated listeners over the course of the twentieth century. Wald revisits original sources--recordings, period articles, memoirs, and interviews--to highlight how music was actually heard and experienced over the years. And in a refreshing departure from more typical histories, he focuses on the world of working musicians and ordinary listeners rather than stars and specialists. He looks for example at the evolution of jazz as dance music, and rock 'n' roll through the eyes of the screaming, twisting teenage girls who made up the bulk of its early audience. Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and the Beatles are all here, but Wald also discusses less familiar names like Paul Whiteman, Guy Lombardo, Mitch Miller, Jo Stafford, Frankie Avalon, and the Shirelles, who in some cases were far more popular than those bright stars we all know today, and who more accurately represent the mainstream of their times.

Written with verve and style, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll shakes up our staid notions of music history and helps us hear American popular music with new ears.

About the Author

Elijah Wald is a musician, writer and historian, whose books include Escaping the Delta: Robert Johnson and the Invention of the Blues; Narcocorrido, about the modern Mexican ballads of drug trafficking; The Mayor of MacDougal Street (with Dave Van Ronk), and Global Minstrels: Voices of World Music. He is currently teaching at UCLA, and contributing regular pieces to the Los Angeles Times. For more information, please visit www.elijahwald.com.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Amateurs and Executants

2. The Ragtime Life

3. Everybody's Doin' It

4. Alexander's Got a Jazz Band Now

5. Cake Eaters and Hooch Drinkers

6. The King of Jazz

7. The Record, the Song and the Radio

8. Sons of Whiteman

9. Swing that Music

10. Technology and Its Discontents

11. Walking Floors and Jumpin' Jive

12. Selling the American Ballad

13. Rock the Joint

14. Big Records for Adults

15. Teen Idyll

16. Twisting Girls Change the World

17. Say You Want a RevolutionEL

Epilogue: The Rock Blot and the Disco Diagram

Bibliography

Index

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Harpdog Brim, March 14, 2012 (view all comments by Harpdog Brim)
Don't worry, Beatles fans: this book is less harsh on the Fab Four than you might gather from the title, and it cuts a much wider swath in considering popular music.

Elijah Wald, journalist and musician, is continuing his historical studies with this fascinating review of 20th century popular music.

As with his previous book, Escaping the Delta, Wald brings a signature technique to his analysis. Instead of limiting himself to reviewing rock critics, viewing the history from current ideas of influential artists, or considering the music from his own critical perspective, he starts by finding out what people were listening to, dancing to, and buying.

We see that changing musical tastes were sometimes more incremental and less disruptive than we might think. Genre barriers are more mutable and influences far richer for artists than in conventional narratives.

Some of his work strikes you as obvious, having read it. Some I certainly disagreed with, as I imagine you will, but the arguments and history he presents is well worth reading.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780199756971
Author:
Wald, Elijah
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
null, Elijah
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Music | Music History, American
Subject:
Music-Popular Performers
Subject:
General Music
Subject:
Music | Popular Music | Pop, Rock, & Popular Culture
Subject:
Popular
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
32 halftones
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
6.1 x 9.2 x 1 in 1.1 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Pop Vocal
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock » Reference and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Business » Communication
Business » General
Featured Titles » Culture

How the Beatles Destroyed Rock'n'roll (11 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 336 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199756971 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "There are no definitive histories," writes Elijah Wald, in this provocative reassessment of American popular music, "because the past keeps looking different as the present changes." Earlier musical styles sound different to us today because we hear them through the musical filter of other styles that came after them, all the way through funk and hip hop.

As its blasphemous title suggests, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll rejects the conventional pieties of mainstream jazz and rock history. Rather than concentrating on those traditionally favored styles, the book traces the evolution of popular music through developing tastes, trends and technologies--including the role of records, radio, jukeboxes and television --to give a fuller, more balanced account of the broad variety of music that captivated listeners over the course of the twentieth century. Wald revisits original sources--recordings, period articles, memoirs, and interviews--to highlight how music was actually heard and experienced over the years. And in a refreshing departure from more typical histories, he focuses on the world of working musicians and ordinary listeners rather than stars and specialists. He looks for example at the evolution of jazz as dance music, and rock 'n' roll through the eyes of the screaming, twisting teenage girls who made up the bulk of its early audience. Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and the Beatles are all here, but Wald also discusses less familiar names like Paul Whiteman, Guy Lombardo, Mitch Miller, Jo Stafford, Frankie Avalon, and the Shirelles, who in some cases were far more popular than those bright stars we all know today, and who more accurately represent the mainstream of their times.

Written with verve and style, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll shakes up our staid notions of music history and helps us hear American popular music with new ears.

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