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The Mongols: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

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The Mongols: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Mongols carved out the largest land-based empire in world history, stretching from Korea to Russia in the north and from China to Syria in the south in the thirteenth century. Along with their leader Chinggis Khan they conjure up images of plunder and total destruction. Chinggis and his descendants introduced a level of violence that had perhaps never been seen in world history.

Although this book does not ignore the devastation and killings wrought by the Mongols, it also reveals their contributions. Within two generations, they developed from conquerors and predators seeking booty to rulers who devised policies to foster the economies of the lands they had subjugated. Adopting political and economic institutions familiar to the conquered populations and recruiting native officials, they won over many of their non-Mongol subjects. Mongol nobles were ardent patrons of art and culture. They supported and influenced the production of Chinese porcelains and textiles, Iranian tiles and illustrated manuscripts, and Russian metalwork.

Their most significant contribution was to foster the greatest contacts among diverse civilizations in world history. The Mongol peace they imposed on much of Asia and their promotion of trade resulted in considerable travel and relations among numerous merchants, scientists, artists, missionaries, and entertainers of different ethnic groups. It is no accident that Europeans, including Marco Polo, first reached China in this period. Eurasian and perhaps global history starts with the Mongol empire.

Rossabi follows the Mongol empire through to collapse due to internal disunity. Struggles for succession and ill-planned and expensive military campaigns ultimately tore apart one of the most influential empires in world history.

Synopsis:

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the Mongols carved out the largest land-based empire in world history, stretching from Korea to Russia in the north and from China to Syria in the south, and unleashing an unprecedented level of violence. But as Morris Rossabi reveals in this Very Short Introduction, within two generations of their bloody conquests, the Mongols evolved from conquerors and predators to wise rulers who devised policies to foster the economies of the lands they had subjugated. By adopting political and economic institutions familiar to the local populations and recruiting native officials, they won over many of their non-Mongol subjects. In addition, Mongol nobles were ardent patrons of art and culture, supporting the production of Chinese porcelains and textiles, Iranian tiles and illustrated manuscripts, and Russian metalwork. Perhaps most important, the peace imposed by the Mongols on much of Asia and their promotion of trade resulted in considerable interaction among merchants, scientists, artists, and missionaries of different ethnic groups--including Europeans. Modern Eurasian and perhaps global history starts with the Mongol empire.

About the Author

Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History, Columbia University; Distinguished Professor of History, City University of New York; author of Khubilai Khan, Voyager from Xanadu, China and Inner Asia, Modern Mongolia, and seven other books. Rossabi has lectured on Chinese and Mongolian history in Asia, Europe, and the U.S. Considered the world's leading expert on the Mongols.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Life on the Steppes

Chapter 2. Chinggis Khan Emerges

Chapter 3. Conquest and Governance

Chapter 4. The Mongols and the World: Part One

Chapter 5. The Mongols and the World: Part Two

Chapter 6. The Mongols and Arts and Crafts

Chapter 7. Decline, Fall, and Legacy

Further Reading

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199840892
Author:
Rossabi, Morris
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
History, World | Asian
Subject:
Art-History and Criticism
Publication Date:
20120531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 maps, 6 b/w halftones
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
4.4 x 6.7 x 0.5 in 0.275 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Asia and Far East
Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
History and Social Science » Asia » China » General
History and Social Science » Military » Weapons » General
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Medieval
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History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance

The Mongols: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 160 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199840892 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the Mongols carved out the largest land-based empire in world history, stretching from Korea to Russia in the north and from China to Syria in the south, and unleashing an unprecedented level of violence. But as Morris Rossabi reveals in this Very Short Introduction, within two generations of their bloody conquests, the Mongols evolved from conquerors and predators to wise rulers who devised policies to foster the economies of the lands they had subjugated. By adopting political and economic institutions familiar to the local populations and recruiting native officials, they won over many of their non-Mongol subjects. In addition, Mongol nobles were ardent patrons of art and culture, supporting the production of Chinese porcelains and textiles, Iranian tiles and illustrated manuscripts, and Russian metalwork. Perhaps most important, the peace imposed by the Mongols on much of Asia and their promotion of trade resulted in considerable interaction among merchants, scientists, artists, and missionaries of different ethnic groups--including Europeans. Modern Eurasian and perhaps global history starts with the Mongol empire.
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