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Longman Anthology of British Literature , Volume 2a (4TH 10 - Old Edition)

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Longman Anthology of British Literature , Volume 2a (4TH 10 - Old Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

A fresh approach to the study of Romantic Literature edited by scholars in the field. Generous coverage of fiction, drama, and poetry alike. Major prose works are included in their entirety, together with a wealth of poetry and drama, from Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience to Byron's Manfred -and beyond. Extensive selections from a wide range of writers include underrepresented female writers like Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Mary Robinson. Perspectives sections shed light on the period as a whole. Examples include a Perspectives section on The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women and on Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship For anyone interested in a volume on Romantic Literature edited by venerable scholars.

Synopsis:

A fresh approach to the study of Romantic Literature edited by scholars in the field.  This volume presents extensive selections from a wide range of underrepresented female writers like Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Mary Robinson.  “Perspectives” sections shed light on the period as a whole.  Examples include a “Perspectives” section on “The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women” and on “Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship”  

 

About the Author

David Damrosch is Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvard University. He is a past president of the American Comparative Literature Association, and has written widely on world literature from antiquity to the present. His books include What Is World Literature? (2003), The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (2007), and How to Read World Literature (2009). He is the founding general editor of the six-volume Longman Anthology of World Literature, 2/e (2009) and the editor of Teaching World Literature (2009).

 

Kevin J. H. Dettmar is W. M. Keck Professor and Chair, Department of English, at Pomona College, and Past President of the Modernist Studies Association.  He is the author of The Illicit Joyce of Postmodernism and Is Rock Dead?, and the editor of Rereading the New: A Backward Glance at Modernism; Marketing Modernisms: Self-Promotion, Canonization, and Rereading; Reading Rock & Roll: Authenticity, Appropriation, Aesthetics; the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners; and The Blackwell Companion to Modernist Literature and Culture, and co-general editor of The Longman Anthology of British Literature.  

 

Peter J. Manning is Professor at Stony Brook University. He is the author of Byron and His Fictions and Reading Romantics, and of numerous essays on the British Romantic poets and prose writers. With Susan J. Wolfson, he has co-edited Selected Poems of Byron, and Selected Poems of Beddoes, Hood, and Praed. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Keats-Shelley Association.

 

Susan J. Wolfson is Professor of English at Princeton University and is general editor of Longman Cultural Editions. A specialist in Romanticism, her critical studies include The Questioning Presence:  Wordsworth, Keats, and the Interrogative Mode in Romantic Poetry, Formal Charges: The Shaping of Poetry in British Romanticism, and Borderlines: The Shiftings of Gender in British Romanticism. She has also produced editions of Felicia Hemans, Lord Byron, Thomas L. Beddoes, William M. Praed, Thomas Hood, as well as the Longman Cultural Edition of Shelley’s Frankenstein. She received Distinguished Scholar Award from Keats-Shelley Association, and grants and fellowships from American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities, J. S. Guggenheim Foundation, and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.  She is President (2009-2010) of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers.

                            

 

Table of Contents

The Romantics and Their Contemporaries

Illustration: Thomas Girtin, Tintern Abbey 2

 

THE ROMANTIC PERIOD AT A GLANCE 3

 

INTRODUCTION 7

LITERATURE AND THE AGE: “NOUGHT WAS LASTING” 7

 

ROMANCE, ROMANTICISM, AND THE POWERS OF THE IMAGINATION 8

 

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND ITS REVERBERATIONS 14

Illustration: Thomas Rowlandson, after a drawing by Lord George Murray,

The Contrast 16

 

THE MONARCHY 19

Illustration: Thomas Lawrence, Coronation Portrait of the Prince Regent

(later, George IV) 20

 

INDUSTRIAL ENGLAND AND “NEVER-RESTING LABOUR” 21

 

CONSUMERS AND COMMODITIES 25

Color Plate 1: John Martin, The Bard

Color Plate 2: Thomas Gainsborough, Mrs. Mary Robinson

Color Plate 3: Thomas Phillips, Lord Byron

Color Plate 4: Anonymous, Portrait of Olaudah Equiano

Color Plate 5: J. M. W. Turner, Slavers Throwing the Dead and Dying

Overboard, Typhoon Coming On

Color Plate 6: William Blake, The Little Black Boy (second plate only)

Color Plate 7: William Blake, The Little Black Boy (another version of #6)

Color Plate 8: William Blake, The Tyger

Color Plate 9: William Blake, The Sick Rose

Color Plate 10: Joseph Wright, An Iron Forge Viewed from Without

 

AUTHORSHIP, AUTHORITY, AND “ROMANTICISM” 27

 

POPULAR PROSE 30

Illustration: George Cruikshank, The Press 32

 

PERSPECTIVES

 

The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque 34

Illustration: Thomas Rowlandson, Dr. Syntax Sketching by the Lake 35

Illustration: Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Passage of the St. Gothard,

1804 36

EDMUND BURKE 37

from A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime

and Beautiful 37

Illustration: Benjamin Robert Haydon, Study after the Elgin

Marbles 38

IMMANUEL KANT 44

from The Critique of Judgement 44

WILLIAM GILPIN 47

Illustration: Edward Dayes, Tintern Abbey from across the

Wye, 1794 48

from Three Essays on Picturesque Beauty, on Picturesque Travel,

and on Sketching Landscape 48

Illustration: From William Gilpin’s Three Essays, 1792 51

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT 52

from A Vindication of the Rights of Men 52

JANE AUSTEN 54

from Pride and Prejudice 54

from Northanger Abbey 55

MARIA JANE JEWSBURY 56

A Rural Excursion 57

 

ANNA LETITIA BARBAULD 61

The Mouse’s Petition to Dr. Priestley 62

On a Lady’s Writing 63

Inscription for an Ice-House 63

To a Little Invisible Being Who Is Expected Soon to Become

Visible 64

To the Poor 65

Washing-Day 66

Eighteen Hundred and Eleven 68

RESPONSE

John Wilson Croker: from A Review of Eighteen Hundred

and Eleven 76h

The First Fire 78

On the Death of the Princess Charlotte 80

 

CHARLOTTE SMITH 81

from ELEGIAC SONNETS AND OTHER POEMS 82

To the Moon 82

“Sighing I see yon little troop at play” 82

Illustration: Charlotte Smith, engraving for Sonnet IV, “To the Moon” 83

To melancholy. Written on the banks of the Arun October, 1785 84

Far on the sands 84

To tranquillity 84

Written in the church-yard at Middleton in Sussex 85

On being cautioned against walking on an headland overlooking the sea 85

The sea view 86

The Dead Beggar 86

The Emigrants, Book 1 87

from Beachy Head 99

 

PERSPECTIVES

The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversy 104

HELEN MARIA WILLIAMS 104

from Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790 105

EDMUND BURKE 109

from Reflections on the Revolution in France 109

Illustration: James Gillray, Smelling out a Rat; –– or The Atheistical

Revolutionist disturbed in his Midnight Calculations 110

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT 118

from A Vindication of the Rights of Men 119

Letter to Joseph Johnson, from Paris, December 27, 1792 127

THOMAS PAINE 127

from The Rights of Man 128

HELEN MARIA WILLIAMS 134

from Letters from France, 1796 134

WILLIAM GODWIN 140

from An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on General

Virtue and Happiness 140

THE ANTI-JACOBIN, OR WEEKLY EXAMINER 145

The Friend of Humanity and the Knife-Grinder 146

The Widow 146

Illustration: James Gillray, illustration to The Friend of Humanity and the

Knife-Grinder 147

HANNAH MORE 148

Village Politics 149

ARTHUR YOUNG 156

from Travels in France During the Years 1787—1788, and 1789 157

from The Example of France, a Warning to Britain 158

 

WILLIAM BLAKE 161

All Religions Are One (Web)

There Is No Natural Religion [a] (Web)

There Is No Natural Religion [b] (Web)

SONGS OF INNOCENCE AND OF EXPERIENCE 163

Illustration: William Blake, frontispiece for Songs of Innocence 164

from Songs of Innocence 165

Introduction 165

The Shepherd 165

The Ecchoing Green 165

The Lamb 166

Illustration: William Blake, The Lamb 167

The Little Black Boy 167

The Blossom 168

The Chimney Sweeper 168

Illustration: William Blake, The Little Boy lost 169

The Little Boy lost 169

Illustration: William Blake, The Little Boy found 170

The Little Boy found 170

The Divine Image 170

HOLY THURSDAY 171

Nurses Song 171

Infant Joy 172

A Dream 172

On Anothers Sorrow 173

COMPANION READING

Charles Lamb: from The Praise of Chimney-Sweepers (Web)

from Songs of Experience 174

Introduction 174

EARTH’S Answer 174

The CLOD & the PEBBLE 175

HOLY THURSDAY 175

The Little Girl Lost 176

The Little Girl Found 177

THE Chimney Sweeper 179

NURSES Song 179

The SICK ROSE 179

Illustration: William Blake, THE Chimney Sweeper 180

Illustration: William Blake, THE FLY 181

THE FLY 181

The Angel 182

The Tyger 182

My Pretty ROSE TREE 183

AH! SUN-FLOWER 183

The GARDEN of LOVE 183

LONDON 184

The Human Abstract 184

INFANT SORROW 185

A Little BOY Lost 185

Illustration: William Blake, A POISON TREE 186

A Little GIRL Lost 186

The School-Boy 187

A DIVINE IMAGE 188

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell 188

Visions of the Daughters of Albion 202

Illustration: William Blake, Plate i from Visions of the Daughters of Albion 202

Illustration: William Blake, Plate 8, from Visions of the Daughters of Albion 208

LETTERS 209

To Dr. John Trusler (23 August 1799) 209

To Thomas Butts (22 November 1802) 211

 

PERSPECTIVES

The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade 214

OLAUDAH EQUIANO 215

from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah

Equiano 216

MARY PRINCE 224

from The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave 225

THOMAS BELLAMY 229

The Benevolent Planters 229

JOHN NEWTON 235

Amazing Grace! 236

ANN CROMARTIE YEARSLEY 236

from A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade 237

WILLIAM COWPER 241

Sweet Meat Has Sour Sauce 242

The Negro’s Complaint 243

ANNA LETITIA BARBAULD 244

Epistle to William Wilberforce, Esq., On the Rejection of the Bill for Abolishing

the Slave Trade 245

HANNAH MORE AND EAGLESFIELD SMITH 247

The Sorrows of Yamba 248

ROBERT SOUTHEY 253

from Poems Concerning the Slave-Trade 253

DOROTHY WORDSWORTH 257

from The Grasmere Journals 257

THOMAS CLARKSON 257

from The History of the Rise, Progress, & Accomplishment of the Abolition of

the African Slave-Trade by the British Parliament 258

Illustration: Packing methods on a slave ship 264

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 266

To Toussaint L’Ouverture 266

To Thomas Clarkson 267

from The Prelude 267

from Humanity 268

Letter to Mary Ann Rawson (May 1833) 269

THE EDINBURGH REVIEW 269

from Abstract of the Information laid on the Table of the House of Commons,

on the Subject of the Slave Trade 270

GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON 272

from Detached Thoughts 272

 

MARY ROBINSON 273

Ode to Beauty 274

January, 1795 275

from Sappho and Phaon, in a Series of Legitimate Sonnets 276

III. The Bower of Pleasure 277

IV. Sappho discovers her Passion 277

VII. Invokes Reason 277

XI. Rejects the Influence of Reason 278

XII. Previous to her Interview with Phaon 278

XVIII. To Phaon 278

XXX. Bids farewell to Lesbos 279

XXXVII. Foresees her Death 279

The Camp 279

The Haunted Beach 281

London’s Summer Morning 282

The Old Beggar 284

 

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT 286

Illustration: Portrait of Mary Wollstonecraft 286

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman 288

from To M. Talleyrand-Périgord, Late Bishop of Autun 288

Introduction 290

from Chapter 1. The Rights and Involved Duties of Mankind

Considered 293

from Chapter 2. The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character

Discussed 295

from Chapter 3. The Same Subject Continued 304

from Chapter 5. Animadversions on Some of the Writers Who Have Rendered

Women Objects of Pity, Bordering on Contempt 308

from Chapter 13. Some Instances of the Folly Which the Ignorance

of Women Generates; with Concluding Reflections on the Moral

Improvement That a Revolution in Female Manners Might Naturally

Be Expected to Produce 308

RESPONSES

Anna Letitia Barbauld, The Rights of Woman 310

Ann Yearsley, The Indifferent Shepherdess to Colin 311

Robert Southey, To Mary Wollstonecraft 312

William Blake, from Mary 313h

from The Wrongs of Woman, or Maria (Web)

 

PERSPECTIVES

The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women 315

CATHARINE MACAULAY 315

from Letters on Education 316

RICHARD POLWHELE 318

from The Unsex’d Females 319

PRISCILLA BELL WAKEFIELD (Web)

from Reflections on the Present Condition of the Female Sex (Web)

MARY ANN RADCLIFFE (Web)

from The Female Advocate (Web)

HANNAH MORE 323

from Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education 324

MARY LAMB 327

Letter to The British Lady’s Magazine 328

WILLIAM THOMPSON AND ANNA WHEELER 332

from Appeal of One Half the Human Race, Women, Against the Pretensions of

the Other Half, Men, to Retain Them in Political, and Thence in Civil and

Domestic Slavery 333

 

JOANNA BAILLIE 339

Plays on the Passions 340

from Introductory Discourse 340

London 345

A Mother to Her Waking Infant 346

A Child to His Sick Grandfather 347

Thunder 348

Song: Woo’d and Married and A’ 350

LITERARY BALLADS 351

 

RELIQUES OF ANCIENT ENGLISH POETRY 352

Sir Patrick Spence 353

 

JAMES MACPHERSON 354

Carric-Thura: A Poem 355

 

ROBERT BURNS 358

To a Mouse 359

To a Louse 360

Flow gently, sweet Afton 361

Ae fond kiss 362

Comin’ Thro’ the Rye (1) 363

Comin’ Thro’ the Rye (2) 363

Scots, wha hae wi’ Wallace bled 364

Is there for honest poverty 365

RESPONSE

Charlotte Smith, To the shade of Burns 366h

A Red, Red Rose 366

Auld Lang Syne 367

The Fornicator. A New Song 368

 

THOMAS MOORE 369

The harp that once through Tara’s halls 369

Believe me, if all those endearing young charms 370

The time I’ve lost in wooing 370

 

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 371

LYRICAL BALLADS (1798) 373

Simon Lee 373

Anecdote for Fathers 376

We are seven 377

Lines written in early spring 379

The Thorn 380

Note to The Thorn (1800) 386

Expostulation and Reply 387

The Tables Turned 388

Old Man Travelling 389

Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey 390

LYRICAL BALLADS (1800, 1802) 394

from Preface 394

[The Principal Object of the Poems. Humble and Rustic Life] 395

[“The Spontaneous Overflow of Powerful Feelings”] 396

[The Language of Poetry] 397

[What is a Poet?] 400

[The Function of Metre] 403

[“Emotion Recollected in Tranquillity”] 404

“There was a Boy” 407

“Strange fits of passion have I known” 407

Song (“She dwelt among th’ untrodden ways”) 408

 “A slumber did my spirit seal” 409

Lucy Gray 409

Poor Susan 411

Nutting 411

“Three years she grew in sun and shower” 413

The Old Cumberland Beggar 414

Michael 418

RESPONSES

Francis Jeffrey: [“the new poetry”] 429

Charles Lamb: from a letter to William Wordsworth 433

Charles Lamb: from a letter to Thomas Manning 434h

SONNETS, 1802—1807 435

Prefatory Sonnet (“Nuns fret not at their Convent’s narrow room”) 435

Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1802 436

“The world is too much with us” 436

“It is a beauteous Evening” 436

“I griev’d for Buonaparte” 437

London, 1802 437

THE PRELUDE, OR GROWTH OF A POET’S MIND 438

Book First. Introduction, Childhood, and School time 439

from Book Second. School time continued 454

[Two Consciousnesses] 454

[Blessed Infant Babe] 454

from Book Fourth. Summer Vacation 456

[A Simile for Autobiography] 456

[Encounter with a “Dismissed” Soldier] 457

from Book Fifth. Books 460

[Meditation on Books. The Dream of the Arab] 460

[A Drowning in Esthwaite’s Lake] 463

[“The Mystery of Words”] 464

from Book Sixth. Cambridge, and the Alps 464

[The Pleasure of Geometric Science] 464

[Arrival in France] 466

[Travelling in the Alps. Simplon Pass] 468

from Book Seventh. Residence in London 471

[A Blind Beggar. Bartholomew Fair] 471

from Book Ninth. Residence in France 475

[Paris] 475

[Revolution, Royalists, and Patriots] 479

from Book Tenth. Residence in France and French Revolution 481

[The Reign of Terror. Confusion. Return to England] 481

[Further Events in France] 484

[The Death of Robespierre and Renewed Optimism] 486

[Britain Declares War on France. The Rise of Napoleon and

Imperialist France] 488

from The Prelude 1850 490

[Apostrophe to Edmund Burke] 490

from Book Eleventh. Imagination, How Impaired and Restored 491

[Imagination Restored by Nature] 491

[“Spots of Time.” Two Memories from Childhood and Later

Reflections] 492

from Book Thirteenth. Conclusion 496

[Climbing Mount Snowdon. Moonlit Vista. Meditation on “Mind,” “Self,”

“Imagination,” “Fear,” and “Love”] 496

[Concluding Retrospect and Prophecy] 501

RESPONSE

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: To a Gentleman 503h

“I travell’d among unknown Men” 506

Resolution and Independence 506

RESPONSE

Lewis Carroll: Upon the Lonely Moor 510h

“I wandered lonely as a Cloud” 512

“My heart leaps up” 513

Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early

Childhood 513

The Solitary Reaper 519

Elegiac Stanzas (“Peele Castle”) 520

RESPONSE

Mary Shelley: On Reading Wordsworth’s Lines on Peele Castle 521h

“Surprized by joy” 522

The Excursion 523

“Scorn not the Sonnet” 524

Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg 524

 

DOROTHY WORDSWORTH 525

Grasmere–A Fragment 527

Address to a Child 529

Irregular Verses 530

Floating Island 533

Lines Intended for My Niece’s Album 534

Thoughts on My Sick-bed 535

When Shall I Tread Your Garden Path? 536

Lines Written (Rather Say Begun) on the Morning of Sunday

April 6th 537

from The Grasmere Journals 538

[Home Alone] 538

[A Leech Gatherer] 539

[A Woman Beggar] 540

[An Old Sailor] 540

[The Grasmere Mailman] 541

[A Vision of the Moon] 541

[A Field of Daffodils] 542

[A Beggar Woman from Cockermouth] 542

[The Circumstances of “Composed upon Westminster Bridge”] 543

[The Circumstances of “It is a beauteous Evening”] 543

[The Household in Winter, with William’s New Wife. Gingerbread] 544

LETTERS 544

To Jane Pollard [A Scheme of Happiness] 544

To Lady Beaumont [A Gloomy Christmas] 545

To Lady Beaumont [Her Poetry, William’s Poetry] 547

To Mrs Thomas Clarkson [Household Labors] 548

To Mrs Thomas Clarkson [A Prospect of Publishing] 549

To William Johnson [Mountain-Climbing with a Woman] 549

RESPONSES

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: from A letter to Joseph Cottle 552

Thomas De Quincey: from Recollections of the Lake

Poets 553

 

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE 557

Sonnet to the River Otter 558

COMPANION READING

William Lisle Bowles: To the River Itchin, Near Winton 559h

The Eolian Harp 559

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison 561

Frost at Midnight 563

from The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere (1798) 565

Part 1 565

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1817) 567

COMPANION READINGS

William Cowper: The Castaway 583

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: from Table Talk 584h

Christabel 585

COMPANION READING

Mary Elizabeth Coleridge: The Witch 601h

Kubla Khan 602

RESPONSE

Mary Robinson: To the Poet Coleridge 604h

The Pains of Sleep 606

Dejection: An Ode 607

LETTERS 611

To William Godwin 611

To Thomas Poole 612

On Donne’s Poetry 613

Work Without Hope 613

Constancy to an Ideal Object 614

Epitaph 614

from The Statesman’s Manual 615

[Symbol and Allegory] 615

from The Friend 615

[My Ghost-Theory] 615

Biographia Literaria 616

Chapter 4 617

[Wordsworth’s Earlier Poetry]

Chapter 11 618

[The Profession of Literature]

Chapter 13 619

[Imagination and Fancy]

Chapter 14 622

[Occasion of the Lyrical Ballads–Preface to the Second Edition–The Ensuing

Controversy]

[Philosophic Definitions of a Poem and Poetry]

Chapter 17 625

[Examination of the Tenets Peculiar to Mr. Wordsworth. Rustic Life and Poetic Language]

Chapter 22 628

[Defects of Wordsworth’s Poetry]

from Lectures on Shakespeare 629

[Mechanic vs. Organic Form] 629

[The Character of Hamlet] 630

[Stage Illusion and the Willing Suspension of Disbelief] 631

[Shakespeare’s Images] 632

[Othello] 633

* COLERIDGE’ S “LECTURES” AND THEIR TIME

Shakespeare in the Nineteenth Century 634

Charles Lamb [and Mary Lamb] Preface to Tales from Shakespear 635

Charles Lamb from On the Tragedies of Shakspeare 636

William Hazlitt from Lectures on the English Poets 639 • The Characters

of Shakespeare’s Plays 640

Thomas De Quincey On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth 640 *

 

GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON 644

She walks in beauty 646

So, we’ll go no more a-roving 647

Manfred 647

Illustration: Ford Madox Brown, Manfred on the Jungfrau, 1840 655

* “MANFRED” AND ITS TIME

The Byronic Hero 683

Byron’s Earlier Heroes from The Giaour 684 • from The Corsair 685

from Lara 685 • Prometheus 686 • from Childe Harold’s

Pilgrimage, Canto the Third [Napoleon Buonaparte] 687

Samuel Taylor Coleridge from The Statesman’s Manual [“Satanic Pride

and Rebellious Self-Idolatry”] 689

Caroline Lamb from Glenarvon 690

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley from Frankenstein; or The Modern

Prometheus 692

Felicia Hemans from The Widow of Crescentius 694

Percy Bysshe Shelley from Preface to Prometheus Unbound 695 • from

Prometheus Unbound, Act 1 695

Robert Southey from Preface to A Vision of Judgement 697

George Gordon, Lord Byron from The Vision of Judgment 698 *

CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE 699

from Canto the Third 699

[Waterloo Fields] 699

[Thunderstorm in the Alps] 704

[Byron’s Strained Idealism. Apostrophe to His Daughter] 705

from Canto the Fourth 707

[Rome. Political Hopes] 707

[The Coliseum. The Dying Gladiator] 709

[Apostrophe to the Ocean. Conclusion] 711

RESPONSES

John Wilson: from a review of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage 713

John Scott: [Lord Byron’s Creations] 714h

DON JUAN 715

Dedication 716

Canto 1 720

from Canto 2 [Shipwreck Juan and Haidée] (Web)

from Canto 3 [Juan and Haidée The Poet for Hire] (Web)

from Canto 7 [Critique of Military “Glory”] (Web)

from Canto 11 [Juan in England] (Web)

Stanzas (“When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home”) 767

On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year 767

LETTERS 768

To Thomas Moore [On Childe Harold Canto III] (28 January 1817) 768

To John Murray [On Don Juan] (6 April 1819) 769

To John Murray [On Don Juan] (12 August 1819) 770

To Douglas Kinnaird [On Don Juan] (26 October 1819) 771

To John Murray [On Don Juan] (16 February 1821) 773

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY 773

To Wordsworth 775

Mont Blanc 776

Hymn to Intellectual Beauty 780

Ozymandias 782

Sonnet: “Lift not the painted veil” 782

Sonnet: England in 1819 783

The Mask of Anarchy 783

RESPONSE

Leigh Hunt: Introduction to The Mask of Anarchy (Web) h

Ode to the West Wind 794

To a Sky-Lark 796

RESPONSE

Thomas Hardy: Shelley’s Skylark (Web) h

To–(“Music, when soft voices die”) 798

Adonais 799

RESPONSES

George Gordon, Lord Byron: from Don Juan 814

George Gordon, Lord Byron: Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley

(26 April 1821) 815

George Gordon, Lord Byron: Letter to John Murray

(30 July 1821) 815h

The Cloud 816

from Hellas 818

Chorus (“Worlds on worlds are rolling ever”) 818

Chorus (“The world’s great age begins anew”) 820

With a Guitar, to Jane 821

To Jane (“The keen stars”) 824

The Cenci (Web)

Julian and Maddalo (Web)

The Sensitive Plant (Web)

Letter to Maria Gisborne (Web)

RESPONSE?

Mary Shelley: Introductions to the Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1824, 1839) (Web) h

from A Defence of Poetry 824

 

FELICIA HEMANS 835

Illustration: Edward Smith, after a painting by Edward Robinson, Portrait of

Felicia Hemans 836

from TALES, AND HISTORIC SCENES, IN VERSE 836

The Wife of Asdrubal 836

The Last Banquet of Antony and Cleopatra 838

Evening Prayer, at a Girls’ School 842

Casabianca 844

from RECORDS OF WOMAN, WITH OTHER POEMS 845

The Bride of the Greek Isle 845

Properzia Rossi 850

Indian Woman’s Death-Song 854

Joan of Arc, in Rheims 855

The Homes of England 858

The Graves of a Household 859

Corinne at the Capitol 860

Woman and Fame 861

RESPONSES

Francis Jeffrey: from A Review of Felicia Hemans’s Poetry 862

William Wordsworth: from Prefatory Note to Extempore Effusion 865h

 

JOHN CLARE 866

Written in November (manuscript) 867

Written in November 868

Songs Eternity 868

[The Lament of Swordy Well] 870

[The Mouse’s Nest] 874

Clock a Clay 875

“I Am” 875

The Mores 876

 

JOHN KEATS 878

Illustration: Charles Brown, Portrait of John Keats, 1819 879

On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer; from Leigh Hunt, “Young Poets”

(Examiner, 1 December 1816) 880

COMPANION READINGS

Alexander Pope: from Homer’s Iliad 883

George Chapman: from Homer’s Iliad 883

Alexander Pope: from Homer’s Odyssey 883

George Chapman: from Homer’s Odyssey 884h

“To one who has been long in city pent” 884

On the Grasshopper and Cricket 884

from Sleep and Poetry 885

RESPONSE

Z. [John Gibson Lockhart]: from On the Cockney School of Poetry 887

John Gibson Lockhart: from The Cockney School of

Poetry No. IV 890h

On Seeing the Elgin Marbles 892

On sitting down to read King Lear once again 892

Sonnet: When I have fears 893

The Eve of St. Agnes 894

La Belle Dame sans Merci (letter text) 904

La Belle Dame sans Mercy, with Leigh Hunt’s Preface

(The Indicator 1820) 906

Incipit altera Sonneta (“If by dull rhymes”) 908

THE ODES OF 1819 908

Ode to Psyche 909

Ode to a Nightingale 911

Ode on a Grecian Urn 913

Ode on Indolence 915

Ode on Melancholy 917

To Autumn 918

Lamia 919

The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream 936

“This living hand” 949

“Bright Star” 949

LETTERS 950

To Benjamin Bailey [“The Truth of Imagination”] (22 November 1817) 950

To George and Thomas Keats [“Intensity” and “Negative Capability”]

(December 1817) 951

To John Hamilton Reynolds [Wordsworth and “The Whims

of an Egotist”] (3 February 1818) 952

To John Taylor [“A Few Axioms”] (27 February 1818) 953

To Benjamin Bailey [“Ardent Pursuit”] (13 May 1818) 953

To John Hamilton Reynolds [Wordsworth, Milton, and “Dark Passages”]

(3 May 1818) 954

To Benjamin Bailey [“I Have Not a Right Feeling Towards Women”]

(18 July 1818) 957

To Richard Woodhouse [The “Camelion Poet” vs. The “Egotistical

Sublime”] (27 October 1818) 957

To George and Georgiana Keats [“indolence,” “poetry” vs. “philosophy,”

the “vale of Soul-Making”] (Spring 1819) 959

To Fanny Brawne [“You Take Possession of Me”] (25 July 1819) 963

To Percy Bysshe Shelley [“An Artist Must Serve Mammon”]

(16 August 1820) 964

To Charles Brown [Keats’s Last Letter] (30 November 1820) 965

 

SIR WALTER SCOTT 966

Illustration: The Author of Waverley 967

Lord Randall 967

The Two Drovers 968

 

PERSPECTIVES

Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship 988

SIR WALTER SCOTT (Web)

Introduction to Tales of My Landlord (Web)

CHARLES LAMB 989

Oxford in the Vacation 990

Dream Children 994

Old China 996

WILLIAM HAZLITT 1000

On Gusto 1001

My First Acquaintance with Poets 1003

THOMAS DE QUINCEY 1016

from Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (Web)

[“What is it that we mean by literature?”] 1017

JANE AUSTEN 1019

from Northanger Abbey, Chapter 1 1020

MARIA JANE JEWSBURY 1023

The Young Author 1023

WILLIAM COBBETT 1027

from Rural Rides 1027

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT SHELLEY 1030

The Swiss Peasant 1031

Product Details

ISBN:
9780205655281
Author:
Damrosch, David
Publisher:
Longman Publishing Group
Editor:
Dettmar, Kevin J. H.
Author:
Dettmar, Kevin J. H.
Author:
Wolfson, Susan
Author:
Manning, Peter
Author:
Manning, Peter J.
Author:
Wolfson, Susan J.
Subject:
General
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
General Literary Criticism & Collections
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Damrosch Series
Series Volume:
2A
Publication Date:
October 2009
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
1088
Dimensions:
9.18x6.48x.89 in. 1.65 lbs.

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  1. The Longman Anthology of British... Used Trade Paper $6.50

Related Subjects

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Textbooks » General

Longman Anthology of British Literature , Volume 2a (4TH 10 - Old Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 1088 pages Longman Publishing Group - English 9780205655281 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A fresh approach to the study of Romantic Literature edited by scholars in the field.  This volume presents extensive selections from a wide range of underrepresented female writers like Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Mary Robinson.  “Perspectives” sections shed light on the period as a whole.  Examples include a “Perspectives” section on “The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women” and on “Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship”  

 

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