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Natural Born Celebrities: Serial Killers in American Culture

by

Natural Born Celebrities: Serial Killers in American Culture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Jeffrey Dahmer. Ted Bundy. John Wayne Gacy. Over the past thirty years, serial killers have become iconic figures in America, the subject of made-for-TV movies and mass-market paperbacks alike. But why do we find such luridly transgressive and horrific individuals so fascinating? What compels us to look more closely at these figures when we really want to look away? Natural Born Celebrities considers how serial killers have become lionized in American culture and explores the consequences of their fame.

David Schmid provides a historical account of how serial killers became famous and how that fame has been used in popular media and the corridors of the FBI alike. Ranging from H. H. Holmes, whose killing spree during the 1893 Chicago World's Fair inspired The Devil in the White City, right up to Aileen Wuornos, the lesbian prostitute whose vicious murder of seven men would serve as the basis for the hit film Monster, Schmid unveils a new understanding of serial killers by emphasizing both the social dimensions of their crimes and their susceptibility to multiple interpretations and uses. He also explores why serial killers have become endemic in popular culture, from their depiction in The Silence of the Lambs and The X-Files to their becoming the stuff of trading cards and even Web sites where you can buy their hair and nail clippings.

Bringing his fascinating history right up to the present, Schmid ultimately argues that America needs the perversely familiar figure of the serial killer now more than ever to manage the fear posed by Osama bin Laden since September 11.

"This is a persuasively argued, meticulously researched, and compelling examination of the media phenomenon of the 'celebrity criminal' in American culture. It is highly readable as well."—Joyce Carol Oates

Synopsis:

Private detectives and detective agencies played a major role in American history from 1870 to 1940.and#160; Pinkerton, Burns, Thiels, and the smaller independents were a multi-million dollar industry, hired out by many if not most American corporations, who needed services of surveillance, strike breaking, and labor espionage.and#160; Not only is John Waltonandrsquo;s account the first sustained history of this industry, it is also the first book to trace the ways in which the private detective came to occupy a cherished place in popular imagination.and#160; Walton paints lively portraits of these mythical figures from Sherlock Holmes, the brilliant eccentric, to Sam Spade, the hard-boiled hero of Dashiell Hammettandrsquo;s best-selling tales.and#160; Thereandrsquo;s a great question lurking in here:and#160; how did pulp magazine editors shape the image of the hard-boiled private eye, and what sorts of interplay obtained between the actual records (agency files, memoirs) of these motley individuals in real life and the legend of the private detective in mass-market fiction?and#160; This history of the private eyes and this account of how the detective industry and the culture industry played off of each other is a first.and#160; Walton show us, in clean clear outline, the figure of the classical private eye, and he shows us further how the memory of this iconic figure was sustained in fiction, radio, film, literary societies, product promotions, adolescent entertainments, and a subculture of detective enthusiasts.

Synopsis:

andldquo;Iandrsquo;m in a business where people come to me with troubles. Big troubles, little troubles, but always troubles they donandrsquo;t want to take to the cops.andrdquo; Thatandrsquo;s Raymond Chandlerandrsquo;s Philip Marlowe, succinctly setting out our image of the private eye. A no-nonsense loner, working on the margins of society, working in the darkness to shine a little light.

and#160;

The reality is a little differentandmdash;but no less fascinating. In The Legendary Detective, John Walton offers a sweeping history of the American private detective in reality and myth, from the earliest agencies to the hard-boiled heights of the 1930s and andrsquo;40s. Drawing on previously untapped archival accounts of actual detective work, Walton traces both the growth of major private detective agencies like Pinkerton, which became powerful bulwarks against social and labor unrest, and the motley, unglamorous work of small-time operatives. He then goes on to show us how writers like Dashiell Hammett and editors of sensational pulp magazines like Black Mask embellished on actual experiences and fashioned an image of the PI as a compelling, even admirable, necessary evil, doing societyandrsquo;s dirty work while adhering to a self-imposed moral code. Scandals, public investigations, and regulations brought the boom years of private agencies to an end in the late 1930s, Walton explains, in the process fully cementing the shift from reality to fantasy.

and#160;

Today, as the private detective has long since given way to security services and armed guards, the myth of the lone PI remains as potent as ever. No fan of crime fiction or American history will want to miss The Legendary Detective.

About the Author

David Schmid is associate professor of English at the University at Buffalo.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction - Idols of Destruction: Celebrity, Consumerism, and the Serial Killer

Part One: A History of Serial Murder

1. The Victorian Killer as Media Star: Jack the Ripper and H. H. Holmes

2. Defining the Enemy Within: The FBI and Serial Murder

Part Two: Serial Murder in American Popular Culture

3. Natural Born Celebrities: Serial Killers and the Hollywood Star System

4. Out of This World: Aliens, Devils, and Serial Killers in Television Crime Drama

5. Next Door Monsters: The Dialectic of Normality and Monstrosity in True-Crime Narratives

6. The Unbearable Straightness of Violence: Queering Serial Murder in True Crime

Epilogue - Serial Killing in America after 9/11

Notes

Works Cited

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226738697
Author:
Schmid, David
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Walton, John
Subject:
Americas (North Central South West Indies)
Subject:
Criminology
Subject:
Public opinion
Subject:
Fame
Subject:
Murder - Serial Killers
Subject:
Serial murderers -- United States.
Subject:
Crime-Criminology
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20061231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
28 halftones
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Crime » Criminology
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

Natural Born Celebrities: Serial Killers in American Culture New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$31.75 In Stock
Product details 232 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226738697 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Private detectives and detective agencies played a major role in American history from 1870 to 1940.and#160; Pinkerton, Burns, Thiels, and the smaller independents were a multi-million dollar industry, hired out by many if not most American corporations, who needed services of surveillance, strike breaking, and labor espionage.and#160; Not only is John Waltonandrsquo;s account the first sustained history of this industry, it is also the first book to trace the ways in which the private detective came to occupy a cherished place in popular imagination.and#160; Walton paints lively portraits of these mythical figures from Sherlock Holmes, the brilliant eccentric, to Sam Spade, the hard-boiled hero of Dashiell Hammettandrsquo;s best-selling tales.and#160; Thereandrsquo;s a great question lurking in here:and#160; how did pulp magazine editors shape the image of the hard-boiled private eye, and what sorts of interplay obtained between the actual records (agency files, memoirs) of these motley individuals in real life and the legend of the private detective in mass-market fiction?and#160; This history of the private eyes and this account of how the detective industry and the culture industry played off of each other is a first.and#160; Walton show us, in clean clear outline, the figure of the classical private eye, and he shows us further how the memory of this iconic figure was sustained in fiction, radio, film, literary societies, product promotions, adolescent entertainments, and a subculture of detective enthusiasts.
"Synopsis" by ,
andldquo;Iandrsquo;m in a business where people come to me with troubles. Big troubles, little troubles, but always troubles they donandrsquo;t want to take to the cops.andrdquo; Thatandrsquo;s Raymond Chandlerandrsquo;s Philip Marlowe, succinctly setting out our image of the private eye. A no-nonsense loner, working on the margins of society, working in the darkness to shine a little light.

and#160;

The reality is a little differentandmdash;but no less fascinating. In The Legendary Detective, John Walton offers a sweeping history of the American private detective in reality and myth, from the earliest agencies to the hard-boiled heights of the 1930s and andrsquo;40s. Drawing on previously untapped archival accounts of actual detective work, Walton traces both the growth of major private detective agencies like Pinkerton, which became powerful bulwarks against social and labor unrest, and the motley, unglamorous work of small-time operatives. He then goes on to show us how writers like Dashiell Hammett and editors of sensational pulp magazines like Black Mask embellished on actual experiences and fashioned an image of the PI as a compelling, even admirable, necessary evil, doing societyandrsquo;s dirty work while adhering to a self-imposed moral code. Scandals, public investigations, and regulations brought the boom years of private agencies to an end in the late 1930s, Walton explains, in the process fully cementing the shift from reality to fantasy.

and#160;

Today, as the private detective has long since given way to security services and armed guards, the myth of the lone PI remains as potent as ever. No fan of crime fiction or American history will want to miss The Legendary Detective.

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