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Cholas and Pishtacos: Stories of Race and Sex in the Andes (Women in Culture & Society)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 2004, one of the worldand#8217;s last bands of voluntarily isolated nomads left behind their ancestral life in the dwindling thorn forests of northern Paraguay, fleeing ranchersand#8217; bulldozers.and#160; Behold the Black Caiman is Lucas Bessireand#8217;s intimate chronicle of the journey of this small group of Ayoreo people, the terrifying new world they now face, and the precarious lives they are piecing together against the backdrop of soul-collecting missionaries, humanitarian NGOs, late liberal economic policies, and the highest deforestation rate in the world.and#160;

Drawing on ten years of fieldwork, Bessire highlights the stark disconnect between the desperate conditions of Ayoreo life for those out of the forest and the well-funded global efforts to preserve those Ayoreo still living in it. By showing how this disconnect reverberates within Ayoreo bodies and minds, his reflexive account takes aim at the devastating consequences of our societyand#8217;s continued obsession with the primitive and raises important questions about anthropologyand#8217;s potent capacity to further or impede indigenous struggles for sovereignty. The result is a timely update to the classic literary ethnographies of South America, a sustained critique of the so-called ontological turnand#151;one of anthropologyand#8217;s hottest trendsand#151;and, above all, an urgent call for scholars and activists alike to rethink their notions of difference.and#160;

Synopsis:

Behold the Black Caiman by anthropologist Lucas Bessire is a haunting ethnography based on a decade of fieldwork among a group of Ayoreo-speaking tribes in the Gran Chaco, the largest forested area in South America after the Amazon. Bessire shows that, far from being untouched and#147;noble savages,and#8221; most of the Ayoreo tribes are struggling to survive on the margins of industrialized society as cattle ranches encroach on the dense wilderness that they once called home. As one of the poorest and most marginalized indigenous groups in the region, the Ayoreo endure unfathomable levels of violence and discrimination. Faced with such brutality, the Ayoreo believe that survival within modernity requires a radical transformation, including the abandonment of nearly all of the practices that count as authorized and#147;native cultureand#8221; in Latin America. Bessire argues that their attitude is not evidence of contamination or loss--as many anthropologists, NGOs, and state representatives would have it--but is rather a profound moral response to their desperate situation. The book thus aims to revise the anthropology and history of Ayoreo-speaking people, and indigenous people in general, who have long been seen as the ultimate primitives and#147;outsideand#8221; the State, market, and history. Written in the tradition of classic texts such asand#160;Chronicle of the Guayaki Indiansand#160;andand#160;Tristes Tropiques, the book tells a tragic story of catastrophic violence that is urgently relevant to identity politics both within Latin America and beyond.

Synopsis:

Winner of the 2003 Senior Book Prize from the American Ethnological Society.

The chola and the pishtaco are provocative characters from South American popular cultureand#8212;the former a sensual mixed-race woman and the latter a horrifying white killerand#8212;who show up in everything from horror stories and dirty jokes to romantic novels and travel posters. In this elegantly written book, these two figures become vehicles for an exploration of race, sex, and violence that pulls the reader into the vivid landscapes and lively cities of the Andes. Weismantel's theory of race and sex begins not with individual identity but with three forms of social and economic interaction: estrangement, exchange, and accumulation. She maps the barriers that separate white and Indian, male and female-barriers that exist not in order to prevent exchange, but rather to exacerbate its inequality.

Weismantel weaves together sources ranging from her own fieldwork and the words of potato sellers, hotel maids, and tourists to classic works by photographer Martin Chambi and novelist Josandeacute; Marandiacute;a Arguedas. Cholas and Pishtacos is also an enjoyable and informative introduction to a relatively unknown region of the Americas.

About the Author

Mary Weismantel is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology and chair of Latin American studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Food, Gender and Poverty in the Ecuadorian Andes.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Foreword

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Indian and White

Part One: Estrangement

1. City of Indians

2. City of Women

Part Two: Exchange

3. Sharp Trading

4. Deadly Intercourse

Part Three: Accumulation

5. White Men

6. The Black Mother

Afterword: Strong Smells

Notes

Works Cited

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226891545
Author:
Weismantel, Mary J.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Weismantel, Mary
Author:
Bessire, Lucas
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Sex role
Subject:
Indians of south america
Subject:
Indian women
Subject:
Andes Region
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
Indians of South America -- Andes Region.
Subject:
Gender Studies-Womens Studies
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Women in Culture and Society Series
Series Volume:
4
Publication Date:
20011231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
18 halftones
Pages:
296
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Central and South America
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Latin America » Peru

Cholas and Pishtacos: Stories of Race and Sex in the Andes (Women in Culture & Society) Used Trade Paper
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$ In Stock
Product details 296 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226891545 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Behold the Black Caiman by anthropologist Lucas Bessire is a haunting ethnography based on a decade of fieldwork among a group of Ayoreo-speaking tribes in the Gran Chaco, the largest forested area in South America after the Amazon. Bessire shows that, far from being untouched and#147;noble savages,and#8221; most of the Ayoreo tribes are struggling to survive on the margins of industrialized society as cattle ranches encroach on the dense wilderness that they once called home. As one of the poorest and most marginalized indigenous groups in the region, the Ayoreo endure unfathomable levels of violence and discrimination. Faced with such brutality, the Ayoreo believe that survival within modernity requires a radical transformation, including the abandonment of nearly all of the practices that count as authorized and#147;native cultureand#8221; in Latin America. Bessire argues that their attitude is not evidence of contamination or loss--as many anthropologists, NGOs, and state representatives would have it--but is rather a profound moral response to their desperate situation. The book thus aims to revise the anthropology and history of Ayoreo-speaking people, and indigenous people in general, who have long been seen as the ultimate primitives and#147;outsideand#8221; the State, market, and history. Written in the tradition of classic texts such asand#160;Chronicle of the Guayaki Indiansand#160;andand#160;Tristes Tropiques, the book tells a tragic story of catastrophic violence that is urgently relevant to identity politics both within Latin America and beyond.
"Synopsis" by ,
Winner of the 2003 Senior Book Prize from the American Ethnological Society.

The chola and the pishtaco are provocative characters from South American popular cultureand#8212;the former a sensual mixed-race woman and the latter a horrifying white killerand#8212;who show up in everything from horror stories and dirty jokes to romantic novels and travel posters. In this elegantly written book, these two figures become vehicles for an exploration of race, sex, and violence that pulls the reader into the vivid landscapes and lively cities of the Andes. Weismantel's theory of race and sex begins not with individual identity but with three forms of social and economic interaction: estrangement, exchange, and accumulation. She maps the barriers that separate white and Indian, male and female-barriers that exist not in order to prevent exchange, but rather to exacerbate its inequality.

Weismantel weaves together sources ranging from her own fieldwork and the words of potato sellers, hotel maids, and tourists to classic works by photographer Martin Chambi and novelist Josandeacute; Marandiacute;a Arguedas. Cholas and Pishtacos is also an enjoyable and informative introduction to a relatively unknown region of the Americas.

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