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Thinking As Computation (12 Edition)

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Thinking As Computation (12 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;This book guides students through an exploration of the idea that thinking might be understood as a form of computation. Students make the connection between thinking and computing by learning to write computer programs for a variety of tasks that require thought, including solving puzzles, understanding natural language, recognizing objects in visual scenes, planning courses of action, and playing strategic games. The material is presented with minimal technicalities and is accessible to undergraduate students with no specialized knowledge or technical background beyond high school mathematics. Students use Prolog (without having to learn algorithms: andquot;Prolog without tears!andquot;), learning to express what they need as a Prolog program and letting Prolog search for answers. After an introduction to the basic concepts, andlt;Iandgt;Thinking as Computationandlt;/Iandgt; offers three chapters on Prolog, covering back-chaining, programs and queries, and how to write the sorts of Prolog programs used in the book. The book follows this with case studies of tasks that appear to require thought, then looks beyond Prolog to consider learning, explaining, and propositional reasoning. Most of the chapters conclude with short bibliographic notes and exercises. The book is based on a popular course at the University of Toronto and can be used in a variety of classroom contexts, by students ranging from first-year liberal arts undergraduates to more technically advanced computer science students. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

This book guides students through an exploration of the idea that thinking might be understood as a form of computation. Students make the connection between thinking and computing by learning to write computer programs for a variety of tasks that require thought, including solving puzzles, understanding natural language, recognizing objects in visual scenes, planning courses of action, and playing strategic games. The material is presented with minimal technicalities and is accessible to undergraduate students with no specialized knowledge or technical background beyond high school mathematics. Students use Prolog (without having to learn algorithms: "Prolog without tears!"), learning to express what they need as a Prolog program and letting Prolog search for answers. After an introduction to the basic concepts, Thinking as Computation offers three chapters on Prolog, covering back-chaining, programs and queries, and how to write the sorts of Prolog programs used in the book. The book follows this with case studies of tasks that appear to require thought, then looks beyond Prolog to consider learning, explaining, and propositional reasoning. Most of the chapters conclude with short bibliographic notes and exercises. The book is based on a popular course at the University of Toronto and can be used in a variety of classroom contexts, by students ranging from first-year liberal arts undergraduates to more technically advanced computer science students.

About the Author

Hector J. Levesque is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He is the coauthor (with Gerhard Lakemeyer) of The Logic of Knowledge Bases (MIT Press, 2001) and coeditor (with Ronald J. Brachman) of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (MIT Press, 1992).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262016995
Subtitle:
A First Course
Author:
Levesque, Hector J.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence
Subject:
Computers-Reference - General
Copyright:
Series:
Thinking as Computation
Publication Date:
20120106
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
139 band#38;w illus.
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.5625 in
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » Artificial Life
Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » General
Computers and Internet » Computer Languages » Prolog
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General

Thinking As Computation (12 Edition) Used Hardcover
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Product details 328 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262016995 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This book guides students through an exploration of the idea that thinking might be understood as a form of computation. Students make the connection between thinking and computing by learning to write computer programs for a variety of tasks that require thought, including solving puzzles, understanding natural language, recognizing objects in visual scenes, planning courses of action, and playing strategic games. The material is presented with minimal technicalities and is accessible to undergraduate students with no specialized knowledge or technical background beyond high school mathematics. Students use Prolog (without having to learn algorithms: "Prolog without tears!"), learning to express what they need as a Prolog program and letting Prolog search for answers. After an introduction to the basic concepts, Thinking as Computation offers three chapters on Prolog, covering back-chaining, programs and queries, and how to write the sorts of Prolog programs used in the book. The book follows this with case studies of tasks that appear to require thought, then looks beyond Prolog to consider learning, explaining, and propositional reasoning. Most of the chapters conclude with short bibliographic notes and exercises. The book is based on a popular course at the University of Toronto and can be used in a variety of classroom contexts, by students ranging from first-year liberal arts undergraduates to more technically advanced computer science students.
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