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This title in other editions

Networked: The New Social Operating System

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Networked: The New Social Operating System Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Daily life is connected life, its rhythms driven by endless email pings and responses, the chimes and beeps of continually arriving text messages, tweets and retweets, Facebook updates, pictures and videos to post and discuss. Our perpetual connectedness gives us endless opportunities to be part of the give-and-take of networking. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;Some worry that this new environment makes us isolated and lonely. But in andlt;Iandgt;Networkedandlt;/Iandgt;, Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman show how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of andquot;networked individualismandquot; liberates us from the restrictions of tightly knit groups; it also requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. Rainie and Wellman outline the andquot;triple revolutionandquot; that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, they examine how the move to networked individualism has expanded personal relationships beyond households and neighborhoods; transformed work into less hierarchical, more team-driven enterprises; encouraged individuals to create and share content; and changed the way people obtain information. Rainie and Wellman guide us through the challenges and opportunities of living in the evolving world of networked individuals.andlt;/Pandgt;

Review:

"Rather than encouraging isolation, the authors propose, the Internet enables people to connect with each other to a far greater extent than before, Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, and Wellman, a sociology professor at the University of Toronto, draw on anecdotes as well as an exhaustive array of surveys about people's use of smartphones, social networks, and the Web in an attempt to prove that 'people are not hooked on gadgets — they are hooked on each other.' The authors optimistically argue that the proliferation of online social networking 'provides opportunities for people to thrive if they know how to maneuver in it'; they also give examples of people in crisis who benefited from online networks. While some of the authors' conclusions might surprise technophobes — such as that people see friends more these days than in the past — the book unfortunately brims with studies that prove the obvious; at this point, it's hardly news that people rely on their phones, search the Web for information about their co-workers, or turn to the Internet for financial information. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Daily life is connected life, its rhythms driven by endless email pings and responses, the chimes and beeps of continually arriving text messages, tweets and retweets, Facebook updates, pictures and videos to post and discuss. Our perpetual connectedness gives us endless opportunities to be part of the give-and-take of networking.

Some worry that this new environment makes us isolated and lonely. But in Networked, Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman show how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of "networked individualism" liberates us from the restrictions of tightly knit groups; it also requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. Rainie and Wellman outline the "triple revolution" that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, they examine how the move to networked individualism has expanded personal relationships beyond households and neighborhoods; transformed work into less hierarchical, more team-driven enterprises; encouraged individuals to create and share content; and changed the way people obtain information. Rainie and Wellman guide us through the challenges and opportunities of living in the evolving world of networked individuals.

About the Author

Lee Rainie is Director of the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project and former managing editor of U.S. News and World Report.Barry Wellman is the S. D. Clark Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, where he directs NetLab.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262017190
Subtitle:
The New Social Operating System
Author:
Rainie, Lee
Author:
Wellman, Barry
Author:
Rainie, Lee
Author:
Rainie, Harrison
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Computers-Reference - General
Subject:
Computers Reference-Social Aspects
Series:
Networked
Publication Date:
20120427
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
44 figures, 13 tables
Pages:
376
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » Information
Computers and Internet » Internet » Web Publishing
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Sociology » Media
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Computer Science

Networked: The New Social Operating System Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.00 In Stock
Product details 376 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262017190 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Rather than encouraging isolation, the authors propose, the Internet enables people to connect with each other to a far greater extent than before, Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, and Wellman, a sociology professor at the University of Toronto, draw on anecdotes as well as an exhaustive array of surveys about people's use of smartphones, social networks, and the Web in an attempt to prove that 'people are not hooked on gadgets — they are hooked on each other.' The authors optimistically argue that the proliferation of online social networking 'provides opportunities for people to thrive if they know how to maneuver in it'; they also give examples of people in crisis who benefited from online networks. While some of the authors' conclusions might surprise technophobes — such as that people see friends more these days than in the past — the book unfortunately brims with studies that prove the obvious; at this point, it's hardly news that people rely on their phones, search the Web for information about their co-workers, or turn to the Internet for financial information. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Daily life is connected life, its rhythms driven by endless email pings and responses, the chimes and beeps of continually arriving text messages, tweets and retweets, Facebook updates, pictures and videos to post and discuss. Our perpetual connectedness gives us endless opportunities to be part of the give-and-take of networking.

Some worry that this new environment makes us isolated and lonely. But in Networked, Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman show how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of "networked individualism" liberates us from the restrictions of tightly knit groups; it also requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. Rainie and Wellman outline the "triple revolution" that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, they examine how the move to networked individualism has expanded personal relationships beyond households and neighborhoods; transformed work into less hierarchical, more team-driven enterprises; encouraged individuals to create and share content; and changed the way people obtain information. Rainie and Wellman guide us through the challenges and opportunities of living in the evolving world of networked individuals.

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