Wintersalen Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Carli Davidson: IMG Puppies for Sale? Read This First



    Shake Puppies contains an almost unsettling amount of cuteness. There is a good chance after looking through its pages you will get puppy fever and... Continue »
    1. $12.59 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Shake Puppies

      Carli Davidson 9780062351722

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$17.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse Education- General
1 Remote Warehouse Education- General

Stuck in the Shallow End: Education, Race, and Computing

by

Stuck in the Shallow End: Education, Race, and Computing Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;The number of African Americans and Latino/as receiving undergraduate and advanced degrees in computer science is disproportionately low, according to recent surveys. And relatively few African American and Latino/a high school students receive the kind of institutional encouragement, educational opportunities, and preparation needed for them to choose computer science as a field of study and profession. In Stuck in the Shallow End, Jane Margolis looks at the daily experiences of students and teachers in three Los Angeles public high schools: an overcrowded urban high school, a math and science magnet school, and a well-funded school in an affluent neighborhood. She finds an insidious andquot;virtual segregationandquot; that maintains inequality. Two of the three schools studied offer only low-level, how-to (keyboarding, cutting and pasting) introductory computing classes. The third and wealthiest school offers advanced courses, but very few students of color enroll in them. The race gap in computer science, Margolis finds, is one example of the way students of color are denied a wide range of occupational and educational futures. Margolis traces the interplay of school structures (such factors as course offerings and student-to-counselor ratios) and belief systems — including teachers' assumptions about their students and students' assumptions about themselves. Stuck in the Shallow End is a story of how inequality is reproduced in America — and how students and teachers, given the necessary tools, can change the system.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

An investigation into why so few African American and Latino high school students are studying computer science reveals the dynamics of inequality in American schools.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;An investigation into why so few African American and Latino high school students are studying computer science reveals the dynamics of inequality in American schools.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

The number of African Americans and Latino/as receiving undergraduate and advanced degrees in computer science is disproportionately low, according to recent surveys. And relatively few African American and Latino/a high school students receive the kind of institutional encouragement, educational opportunities, and preparation needed for them to choose computer science as a field of study and profession. In Stuck in the Shallow End, Jane Margolis looks at the daily experiences of students and teachers in three Los Angeles public high schools: an overcrowded urban high school, a math and science magnet school, and a well-funded school in an affluent neighborhood. She finds an insidious "virtual segregation" that maintains inequality. Two of the three schools studied offer only low-level, how-to (keyboarding, cutting and pasting) introductory computing classes. The third and wealthiest school offers advanced courses, but very few students of color enroll in them. The race gap in computer science, Margolis finds, is one example of the way students of color are denied a wide range of occupational and educational futures. Margolis traces the interplay of school structures (such factors as course offerings and student-to-counselor ratios) and belief systems — including teachers' assumptions about their students and students' assumptions about themselves. Stuck in the Shallow End is a story of how inequality is reproduced in America — and how students and teachers, given the necessary tools, can change the system.

About the Author

Jane Margolis is Senior Researcher at UCLA Center X at UCLA's Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. She is the coauthor of Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press, 2002).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262514040
Author:
Margolis, Jane
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
M
Author:
Holme, Jennifer Jellison
Author:
Goode, Joanna
Author:
Nao, Kim
Author:
Estrella, Rachel
Author:
assachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Inclusive education
Subject:
Computers & Technology
Subject:
Secondary
Subject:
Philosophy & Social Aspects
Subject:
Teaching Methods & Materials - Science & Technology
Subject:
Education-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Stuck in the Shallow End
Publication Date:
20100226
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 band#38;w illus.
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.5625 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Personal Computers » General
Education » General
Education » Multicultural

Stuck in the Shallow End: Education, Race, and Computing New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 216 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262514040 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An investigation into why so few African American and Latino high school students are studying computer science reveals the dynamics of inequality in American schools.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;An investigation into why so few African American and Latino high school students are studying computer science reveals the dynamics of inequality in American schools.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , The number of African Americans and Latino/as receiving undergraduate and advanced degrees in computer science is disproportionately low, according to recent surveys. And relatively few African American and Latino/a high school students receive the kind of institutional encouragement, educational opportunities, and preparation needed for them to choose computer science as a field of study and profession. In Stuck in the Shallow End, Jane Margolis looks at the daily experiences of students and teachers in three Los Angeles public high schools: an overcrowded urban high school, a math and science magnet school, and a well-funded school in an affluent neighborhood. She finds an insidious "virtual segregation" that maintains inequality. Two of the three schools studied offer only low-level, how-to (keyboarding, cutting and pasting) introductory computing classes. The third and wealthiest school offers advanced courses, but very few students of color enroll in them. The race gap in computer science, Margolis finds, is one example of the way students of color are denied a wide range of occupational and educational futures. Margolis traces the interplay of school structures (such factors as course offerings and student-to-counselor ratios) and belief systems — including teachers' assumptions about their students and students' assumptions about themselves. Stuck in the Shallow End is a story of how inequality is reproduced in America — and how students and teachers, given the necessary tools, can change the system.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.