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25 Partner Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Winter's Bone

by

Winter's Bone Cover

ISBN13: 9780316066419
ISBN10: 0316066419
Condition: Student Owned
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Ree Dolly's father has skipped bail on charges that he ran a crystal meth lab, and the Dollys will lose their house if he doesn't show up for his next court date. With two young brothers depending on her, 16-year-old Ree knows she has to bring her father back, dead or alive. Living in the harsh poverty of the Ozarks, Ree learns quickly that asking questions of the rough Dolly clan can be a fatal mistake. But, as an unsettling revelation lurks, Ree discovers unforeseen depths in herself and in a family network that protects its own at any cost.

Review:

"Woodrell flirts with — but doesn't succumb to — cliche in his eighth novel, a luminescent portrait of the poor and desperate South that drafts 16-year-old Ree Dolly, blessed with 'abrupt green eyes,' as its unlikely heroine. Ree, too young to escape the Ozarks by joining the army, cares for her two younger brothers and mentally ill mother after her methamphetamine-cooking father, Jessup, disappears. Recently arrested on drug charges, Jessup bonded out of jail by using the family home as collateral, but with a court date set in one week's time and Jessup nowhere to be found, Ree has to find him — dead or alive — or the house will be repossessed. At its best, the novel captures the near-religious criminal mania pervasive in rural communities steeped in drug culture. Woodrell's prose, lyrical as often as dialogic, creates an unwieldy but alluring narrative that allows him to draw moments of unexpected tenderness from predictable scripts: from Ree's fearsome, criminal uncle Teardrop, Ree discovers the unshakable strength of family loyalty; from her friend Gail and her woefully dependant siblings, Ree learns that a faith in kinship can blossom in the face of a bleak and flawed existence." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"If you're going to read 'Winter's Bone,' it's best to plan on reading it twice — once to get the feel of the thing and once to figure out who is who, who's got the power here and what opaque and arcane rules hold this world together.

The world in question is Southeastern hill country, the Ozarks, where the population has lived almost as long as there have been white folks on the continent.... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[B]oth razor sharp and grimly gorgeous." Library Journal

Review:

"Despite the questionable ending, some teens will be drawn into Ree's story. But the book is not for the young or the faint-of-heart; Ree is not a saint, and this gritty story requires maturity to appreciate." VOYA

Review:

"A compelling testament to how people survive in the worst of circumstances." School Library Journal

Review:

"[C]ompact, atmospheric and deeply felt....Woodrell's novels...tap a ferocious, ancient manner of storytelling, shrewdly combining a poet's vocabulary with the vivid, old-fashioned vernacular of the backwoods. They're forces of nature." Seattle Times

Review:

"[P]acks a kind of biblical, Old West, Cormac McCarthy wallop — hard and deep....To call Woodrell...the Next Big Thing in literary crime fiction only can mean this: We are way behind. He is the current big thing. And not to be missed." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

"Woodrell burrows ever deeper into the heart of Ozark darkness, weaving a tale both haunting in its simplicity and mythic in scope.... most profound and haunting work yet." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[Woodrell's] Old Testament prose and blunt vision have a chilly timelessness that suggests this novel will speak to readers as long as there are readers, and as long as violence is practiced more often than hope or language." David Bowman, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"[A]nother stunner....Diehard fans of the author will not be disappointed with Winter's Bone. Those unacquainted with his work...are in for a unique reading experience that will doubtless send them scurrying off to find more of his novels." Kansas City Star

Synopsis:

When Ree Dollys father skips bail, the 16-year-old knows if he doesn't show up, her family will lose their home. Her goal had been to leave her life of poverty and join the Army, but first she must find her father, teach her little brothers to fend for themselves, and escape a downward spiral of misery.

About the Author

Dan Woodrell is the author of five previous novels: Under the Bright Lights, Woe to Live On (to be filmed by director Ang Lee, adapted by James Shamus), Muscle for the Wing, The Ones You Do, and Give Us a Kiss — a New York Times Notable Book for 1996. He lives in Missouri.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Jack Fischer, January 19, 2012 (view all comments by Jack Fischer)
Daniel Woodrell is, indeed, as several others have said, the best unknown writer working in America right now. He's pigeon-holed as a crime writer and is credited with creating something he calls "country-noir" for his tales set in his home of the Ozark Mountains in Southern Missouri. But with the richness of his writing, his ear for regional and class-aware dialogue and his sense of humor, he deserves the comparisions people are making to Flannery O'Connor and Faulkner. Winter's Bone, the tale of a young girl searching for her disappeared meth-cooking dad so she can save the family homestead, is brilliantly rendered.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Magsie, January 3, 2012 (view all comments by Magsie)
True Grit in the Ozarks. A wonderful novel which has made me a huge fan of Daniel Woodrell!
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threewells, January 4, 2011 (view all comments by threewells)
wonderfully written, a gem of a book, finished and read it again , savoring each paragraph..
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View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316066419
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Woodrell, Daniel
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fathers and daughters
Subject:
Teenage girls
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Family relationships; Teenage girls; Mentall illness; Missing persons; Drug addiction; Abandonment; Siblings; Fugitives
Publication Date:
20070711
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.18x5.54x.63 in. .45 lbs.

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Related Subjects


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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

Winter's Bone Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.00 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Back Bay Books - English 9780316066419 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Woodrell flirts with — but doesn't succumb to — cliche in his eighth novel, a luminescent portrait of the poor and desperate South that drafts 16-year-old Ree Dolly, blessed with 'abrupt green eyes,' as its unlikely heroine. Ree, too young to escape the Ozarks by joining the army, cares for her two younger brothers and mentally ill mother after her methamphetamine-cooking father, Jessup, disappears. Recently arrested on drug charges, Jessup bonded out of jail by using the family home as collateral, but with a court date set in one week's time and Jessup nowhere to be found, Ree has to find him — dead or alive — or the house will be repossessed. At its best, the novel captures the near-religious criminal mania pervasive in rural communities steeped in drug culture. Woodrell's prose, lyrical as often as dialogic, creates an unwieldy but alluring narrative that allows him to draw moments of unexpected tenderness from predictable scripts: from Ree's fearsome, criminal uncle Teardrop, Ree discovers the unshakable strength of family loyalty; from her friend Gail and her woefully dependant siblings, Ree learns that a faith in kinship can blossom in the face of a bleak and flawed existence." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[B]oth razor sharp and grimly gorgeous."
"Review" by , "Despite the questionable ending, some teens will be drawn into Ree's story. But the book is not for the young or the faint-of-heart; Ree is not a saint, and this gritty story requires maturity to appreciate."
"Review" by , "A compelling testament to how people survive in the worst of circumstances."
"Review" by , "[C]ompact, atmospheric and deeply felt....Woodrell's novels...tap a ferocious, ancient manner of storytelling, shrewdly combining a poet's vocabulary with the vivid, old-fashioned vernacular of the backwoods. They're forces of nature."
"Review" by , "[P]acks a kind of biblical, Old West, Cormac McCarthy wallop — hard and deep....To call Woodrell...the Next Big Thing in literary crime fiction only can mean this: We are way behind. He is the current big thing. And not to be missed."
"Review" by , "Woodrell burrows ever deeper into the heart of Ozark darkness, weaving a tale both haunting in its simplicity and mythic in scope.... most profound and haunting work yet."
"Review" by , "[Woodrell's] Old Testament prose and blunt vision have a chilly timelessness that suggests this novel will speak to readers as long as there are readers, and as long as violence is practiced more often than hope or language."
"Review" by , "[A]nother stunner....Diehard fans of the author will not be disappointed with Winter's Bone. Those unacquainted with his work...are in for a unique reading experience that will doubtless send them scurrying off to find more of his novels."
"Synopsis" by , When Ree Dollys father skips bail, the 16-year-old knows if he doesn't show up, her family will lose their home. Her goal had been to leave her life of poverty and join the Army, but first she must find her father, teach her little brothers to fend for themselves, and escape a downward spiral of misery.
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