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All Day Permanent Red: The First Battle Scenes of Homer's Iliad Rewritten

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Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Setting down her topaz saucer heaped with nectarine jelly,

Emptying her blood-red mouth—set in her ice-white face—

Teenaged Athena jumped up and shrieked:

“Kill! Kill for me!

Better to die than live without killing!”

Who says prayer does no good?

Christopher Logues work in progress, his Iliad, has been called “the best translation of Homer since Popes” (The New York Review of Books). Here in All Day Permanent Red is doomed Hector, the lion, “slam-scattering the herd” at the height of his powers. Here is the Greek army rising with a sound like a “sky-wide Venetian blind.” Here is an arrows tunnel, “the width of a lipstick,” through a neck. Like Homer himself, Logue is quick to mix the ancient and the new, because his Troy exists outside time, and no translator has a more Homeric interest in the truth of battle, or in the absurdity and sublimity of war.

Review:

"Logue's Homer is less a translation than a channeling....Logue strikes a terrific balance between poetic elevation and abject stupidity, conveying at once the terrible power and terrible banality of violence..." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[B]ring[s] the ethos of Homer to life...with a vigor and immediacy that surpasses every available modern translation. Logue's Homer satisfies the first requirement of a classic: It is a work completely unlike any that came before it." Jamie James, The Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[T]his version of the first skirmishes in the Iliad has the immediacy of an embed's dispatches....[Logue's] verse displays a gift for the unexpected simile....The music in the latest installment is wild and improvisational..." The New Yorker

Review:

"No classical scholar, no critic, has voiced more concisely the lasting impact of Homer." George Steiner, The Times Literary Supplement (London)

Synopsis:

The fourth book in Christopher Logue's translation of Homer's Iliad.

Synopsis:

"Setting down her topaz saucer heaped with nectarine jelly, "

"Emptying her blood-red mouth--set in her ice-white face--"

"Teenaged Athena jumped up and shrieked: "

""Kill! Kill for me!"

"Better to die than live without killing!""

"Who says prayer does no good?"

Christopher Logue's work in progress, his Iliad, has been called "the best translation of Homer since Pope's" ("The New York Review of Books"). Here in "All Day Permanent Red "is doomed Hector, the lion, "slam-scattering the herd" at the height of his powers. Here is the Greek army rising with a sound like a "sky-wide Venetian blind." Here is an arrow's tunnel, "the width of a lipstick," through a neck. Like Homer himself, Logue is quick to mix the ancient and the new, because his Troy exists outside time, and no translator has a more Homeric interest in the truth of battle, or in the absurdity and sublimity of war.

"Setting down her topaz saucer heaped with nectarine jelly, "

"Emptying her blood-red mouth--set in her ice-white face--"

"Teenaged Athena jumped up and shrieked: "

""Kill! Kill for me!"

"Better to die than live without killing!""

"Who says prayer does no good?"

Christopher Logue's work in progress, his Iliad, has been called "the best translation of Homer since Pope's" ("The New York Review of Books"). Here in "All Day Permanent Red "is doomed Hector, the lion, "slam-scattering the herd" at the height of his powers. Here is the Greek army rising with a sound like a "sky-wide Venetian blind." Here is an arrow's tunnel, "the width of a lipstick," through a neck. Like Homer himself, Logue is quick to mix the ancient and the new, because his Troy exists outside time, and no translator has a more Homeric interest in the truth of battle, or in the absurdity and sublimity of war.


About the Author

Christopher Logue is a screenwriter, a film actor, and the author of several books of poems. He lives in London, England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374529291
Author:
Logue, Christopher
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Author:
istopher Logue
Author:
Chr
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Single Author / General
Subject:
Anthologies-United Kingdom Poetry
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
June 1, 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.148 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » United Kingdom » Poetry
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

All Day Permanent Red: The First Battle Scenes of Homer's Iliad Rewritten Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.00 In Stock
Product details 64 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374529291 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Logue's Homer is less a translation than a channeling....Logue strikes a terrific balance between poetic elevation and abject stupidity, conveying at once the terrible power and terrible banality of violence..."
"Review" by , "[B]ring[s] the ethos of Homer to life...with a vigor and immediacy that surpasses every available modern translation. Logue's Homer satisfies the first requirement of a classic: It is a work completely unlike any that came before it."
"Review" by , "[T]his version of the first skirmishes in the Iliad has the immediacy of an embed's dispatches....[Logue's] verse displays a gift for the unexpected simile....The music in the latest installment is wild and improvisational..."
"Review" by , "No classical scholar, no critic, has voiced more concisely the lasting impact of Homer."
"Synopsis" by , The fourth book in Christopher Logue's translation of Homer's Iliad.
"Synopsis" by , "Setting down her topaz saucer heaped with nectarine jelly, "

"Emptying her blood-red mouth--set in her ice-white face--"

"Teenaged Athena jumped up and shrieked: "

""Kill! Kill for me!"

"Better to die than live without killing!""

"Who says prayer does no good?"

Christopher Logue's work in progress, his Iliad, has been called "the best translation of Homer since Pope's" ("The New York Review of Books"). Here in "All Day Permanent Red "is doomed Hector, the lion, "slam-scattering the herd" at the height of his powers. Here is the Greek army rising with a sound like a "sky-wide Venetian blind." Here is an arrow's tunnel, "the width of a lipstick," through a neck. Like Homer himself, Logue is quick to mix the ancient and the new, because his Troy exists outside time, and no translator has a more Homeric interest in the truth of battle, or in the absurdity and sublimity of war.

"Setting down her topaz saucer heaped with nectarine jelly, "

"Emptying her blood-red mouth--set in her ice-white face--"

"Teenaged Athena jumped up and shrieked: "

""Kill! Kill for me!"

"Better to die than live without killing!""

"Who says prayer does no good?"

Christopher Logue's work in progress, his Iliad, has been called "the best translation of Homer since Pope's" ("The New York Review of Books"). Here in "All Day Permanent Red "is doomed Hector, the lion, "slam-scattering the herd" at the height of his powers. Here is the Greek army rising with a sound like a "sky-wide Venetian blind." Here is an arrow's tunnel, "the width of a lipstick," through a neck. Like Homer himself, Logue is quick to mix the ancient and the new, because his Troy exists outside time, and no translator has a more Homeric interest in the truth of battle, or in the absurdity and sublimity of war.


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