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Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

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Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries Cover

ISBN13: 9780393062243
ISBN10: 0393062244
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


A vibrant collection of essays on the cosmos from the nation's best-known astrophysicist.

Loyal readers of the monthly Universe essays in Natural History magazine have long recognized Neil deGrasse Tyson's talent for guiding them through the mysteries of the cosmos with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. Here, Tyson compiles his favorite essays across a myriad of cosmic topics. The title essay introduces readers to the physics of black holes by explaining the gory details of what would happen to your body if you fell into one. Holy Wars examines the needless friction between science and religion in the context of historical conflicts. The Search for Life in the Universe explores astral life from the frontiers of astrobiology. And Hollywood Nights assails the movie industry's feeble efforts to get its night skies right.

Known for his ability to blend content, accessibility, and humor, Tyson is a natural teacher who simplifies some of the most complex concepts in astrophysics while simultaneously sharing his infectious excitement about our universe.

Review:

"What would it feel like if your spaceship were to venture too close to the black hole lurking at the center of the Milky Way? According to astrophysicist Tyson, director of New York City's Hayden Planetarium, size does matter when it comes to black holes, although the chances of your surviving the encounter aren't good in any case. Tyson takes readers on an exciting journey from Earth's hot springs, where extremophiles flourish in hellish conditions, to the frozen, desolate stretches of the Oort Cloud and the universe's farthest reaches, in both space and time. Tyson doesn't restrict his musings to astrophysics, but wanders into related fields like relativity and particle physics, which he explains just as clearly as he does Lagrangian points, where we someday may park interplanetary filling stations. He tackles popular myths (is the sun yellow?) and takes movie directors — most notably James Cameron — to task for spectacular goofs. In the last section the author gives his take on the hot subject of intelligent design. Readers of Natural History magazine will be familiar with many of the 42 essays collected here, while newcomers will profit from Tyson's witty and entertaining description of being pulled apart atom by atom into a black hole, and other, closer-to-earth, and cheerier, topics. 9 illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Touching on just about everything you want to know about the cosmos, this collection of essays by Tyson, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History and columnist for Natural History, explores topics from astral life to the movie industry's attempts to represent the night skies. In clear and witty prose, Tyson introduces the physics of black holes by describing what would happen if someone fell in, examines the needless friction between science and religion, and tells an ego-deflating story of Earth's progression from the center of the universe to a "small speck in the cosmos." Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A vibrant collection of essays on the cosmos from the nation's best-known astrophysicist. "One of today's best popularizers of science."--

Synopsis:

Loyal readers of the monthly "Universe" essays in Natural History magazine have long recognized Neil deGrasse Tyson's talent for guiding them through the mysteries of the cosmos with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. Here, Tyson compiles his favorite essays across a myriad of cosmic topics. The title essay introduces readers to the physics of black holes by explaining the gory details of what would happen to your body if you fell into one. "Holy Wars" examines the needless friction between science and religion in the context of historical conflicts. "The Search for Life in the Universe" explores astral life from the frontiers of astrobiology. And "Hollywood Nights" assails the movie industry's feeble efforts to get its night skies right.

Known for his ability to blend content, accessibility, and humor, Tyson is a natural teacher who simplifies some of the most complex concepts in astrophysics while simultaneously sharing his infectious excitement about our universe.

Synopsis:

A vibrant collection of essays on the cosmos is delivered by the nation's best-known astrophysicist, who is popular for his monthly "Universe" essays in "Natural History" magazine.

About the Author

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist with the American Museum of Natural History, director of the world-famous Hayden Planetarium, a monthly columnist for Natural History, and an award-winning author. He has begun production of a new Cosmos series, premiering in early 2013. He lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Elizabeth, May 14, 2007 (view all comments by Elizabeth)
A very interesting read, and you don't need a degree in astrophysics to understand it! The book is a compilation of articles, so it's easy to pick up and put down, but I always had a hard time putting it down. Tyson is a compelling writer who seems to have just as much passion for bringing the universe to the masses as he does for the universe itself.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780393062243
Author:
Tyson, Neil de Grasse
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Degrasse Tyson, Neil
Subject:
Science
Subject:
Cosmology
Subject:
Religion and science
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Astronomy
Subject:
Solar system
Subject:
Astronomy - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
November 2006
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
21.84 x 14.99 x 3.3 mm 0.52 kg

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Related Subjects


Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » Cosmology
Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Cosmology
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Essays

Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries Sale Hardcover
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$9.98 In Stock
Product details 384 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393062243 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "What would it feel like if your spaceship were to venture too close to the black hole lurking at the center of the Milky Way? According to astrophysicist Tyson, director of New York City's Hayden Planetarium, size does matter when it comes to black holes, although the chances of your surviving the encounter aren't good in any case. Tyson takes readers on an exciting journey from Earth's hot springs, where extremophiles flourish in hellish conditions, to the frozen, desolate stretches of the Oort Cloud and the universe's farthest reaches, in both space and time. Tyson doesn't restrict his musings to astrophysics, but wanders into related fields like relativity and particle physics, which he explains just as clearly as he does Lagrangian points, where we someday may park interplanetary filling stations. He tackles popular myths (is the sun yellow?) and takes movie directors — most notably James Cameron — to task for spectacular goofs. In the last section the author gives his take on the hot subject of intelligent design. Readers of Natural History magazine will be familiar with many of the 42 essays collected here, while newcomers will profit from Tyson's witty and entertaining description of being pulled apart atom by atom into a black hole, and other, closer-to-earth, and cheerier, topics. 9 illus." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A vibrant collection of essays on the cosmos from the nation's best-known astrophysicist. "One of today's best popularizers of science."--
"Synopsis" by , Loyal readers of the monthly "Universe" essays in Natural History magazine have long recognized Neil deGrasse Tyson's talent for guiding them through the mysteries of the cosmos with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. Here, Tyson compiles his favorite essays across a myriad of cosmic topics. The title essay introduces readers to the physics of black holes by explaining the gory details of what would happen to your body if you fell into one. "Holy Wars" examines the needless friction between science and religion in the context of historical conflicts. "The Search for Life in the Universe" explores astral life from the frontiers of astrobiology. And "Hollywood Nights" assails the movie industry's feeble efforts to get its night skies right.

Known for his ability to blend content, accessibility, and humor, Tyson is a natural teacher who simplifies some of the most complex concepts in astrophysics while simultaneously sharing his infectious excitement about our universe.
"Synopsis" by , A vibrant collection of essays on the cosmos is delivered by the nation's best-known astrophysicist, who is popular for his monthly "Universe" essays in "Natural History" magazine.
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