Summer Reading B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | July 31, 2015

    Susan Casey: IMG Voices in the Ocean



    In 2010, the year dolphins came into my life, I spent my days working in midtown Manhattan, on the 36th floor of a big, impressive office building.... Continue »
    1. $19.57 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.00
List price: $16.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
22 Partner Warehouse General- General

This title in other editions

Islam Without Extremes (13 Edition)

by

Islam Without Extremes (13 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

In Rethinking Islam, Katajun Amirpur argues that the West’s impression of Islam as a backward-looking faith, resistant to post-Enlightenment thinking, is misleading and—due to its effects on political discourse—damaging. Introducing readers to key thinkers and activists—such as Abu Zaid, a free-thinking Egyptian Qur’an scholar; Abdolkarim Soroush, an academic and former member of Khomeini’s Cultural Revolution Committee; and Amina Wadud, an American feminist who was the first woman to lead the faithful in Friday Prayer—Amirpur reveals a powerful yet lesser-known tradition of inquiry and dissent within Islam, one that is committed to democracy and human rights. By examining these and many other similar figures’ ideas, she reveals the many ways they reject fundamentalist assertions and instead call for a diversity of opinion, greater freedom, and equality of the sexes. 

Book News Annotation:

Akyol explains that Islam and freedom are not mutually exclusive, but entirely compatible. The book begins with a history of Islam in the Middle East, with little-known information about the liberal ideas that emerged with the growth of the religion--yet did not become definitive over time. It continues with a study on the Ottoman Empire, a Muslim superpower that successfully managed to apply Western liberalism with Islamic ideals...an accomplishment that is largely overlooked. The author then proceeds to critically examine examples of twentieth-century Islamic oppression and militarism, ending with a section on Islam and Western influences in modern-day Turkey. The book maintains that, in order for Islam to create and advance in its own form of modernity, it must adapt to contemporary ideals and embrace liberty. Annotation ©2015 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Synopsis:

"A delightfully original take on...the prospects for liberal democracy in the broader Islamic Middle East."--Matthew Kaminski,

Synopsis:

In Re-thinking Islam, Katajun Amirpur argues that the impression we have of Islam as a backward-looking faith resistant to the ideas of Enlightenment thinking is false. Amirpur introduces us to the Farsi term ‘nouandishi-ye eslami (New Islamic Thinking) and to influential reformers who are committed to democracy and human rights. The free-thinking Egyptian Quran scholar Abu Zaid, the academic Abdolkarim Soroush, a former member of Khomeinis Cultural Revolution Committee, and the American feminist Amina Wadud, who was the first woman to lead the faithful in Friday Prayer, all refute the idea that there is one true, fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. Instead they call for greater freedom and equality of the sexes. By examining the ideas of these thinkers, Amirpur shows breadth and diversity of Islam as a multi-dimensional faith.

Synopsis:

As the Arab Spring threatens to give way to authoritarianism in Egypt and reports from Afghanistan detail widespread violence against U.S. troops and women, news from the Muslim world raises the question: Is Islam incompatible with freedom? In Islam without Extremes, Turkish columnist Mustafa Akyol answers this question by revealing the little-understood roots of political Islam, which originally included both rationalist, flexible strains and more dogmatic, rigid ones. Though the rigid traditionalists won out, Akyol points to a flourishing of liberalism in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and the unique "Islamo-liberal synthesis" in present-day Turkey. As he powerfully asserts, only by accepting a secular state can Islamic societies thrive. offers a desperately needed intellectual basis for the reconcilability of Islam and liberty.

About the Author

Mustafa Akyol lives in Istanbul and is a columnist for the Turkish newspapers Hürriyet Daily News and Star. He has written opinion pieces for the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, and Newsweek.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393347241
Author:
Akyol
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Akyol, Mustafa
Author:
Amirpur, Katajun
Subject:
Islam
Subject:
Islam - General
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20131131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. No Ordinary Men: Dietrich Bonhoeffer... Used Hardcover $13.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Islam » General
Religion » Islam » Philosophy

Islam Without Extremes (13 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.00 In Stock
Product details 256 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393347241 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "A delightfully original take on...the prospects for liberal democracy in the broader Islamic Middle East."--Matthew Kaminski,
"Synopsis" by ,
In Re-thinking Islam, Katajun Amirpur argues that the impression we have of Islam as a backward-looking faith resistant to the ideas of Enlightenment thinking is false. Amirpur introduces us to the Farsi term ‘nouandishi-ye eslami (New Islamic Thinking) and to influential reformers who are committed to democracy and human rights. The free-thinking Egyptian Quran scholar Abu Zaid, the academic Abdolkarim Soroush, a former member of Khomeinis Cultural Revolution Committee, and the American feminist Amina Wadud, who was the first woman to lead the faithful in Friday Prayer, all refute the idea that there is one true, fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. Instead they call for greater freedom and equality of the sexes. By examining the ideas of these thinkers, Amirpur shows breadth and diversity of Islam as a multi-dimensional faith.
"Synopsis" by , As the Arab Spring threatens to give way to authoritarianism in Egypt and reports from Afghanistan detail widespread violence against U.S. troops and women, news from the Muslim world raises the question: Is Islam incompatible with freedom? In Islam without Extremes, Turkish columnist Mustafa Akyol answers this question by revealing the little-understood roots of political Islam, which originally included both rationalist, flexible strains and more dogmatic, rigid ones. Though the rigid traditionalists won out, Akyol points to a flourishing of liberalism in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and the unique "Islamo-liberal synthesis" in present-day Turkey. As he powerfully asserts, only by accepting a secular state can Islamic societies thrive. offers a desperately needed intellectual basis for the reconcilability of Islam and liberty.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.