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Great Expectations (81 Edition)

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Great Expectations (81 Edition) Cover

ISBN13: 9780553213423
ISBN10: 0553213423
Condition: Student Owned
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Synopses & Reviews

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Publisher Comments:

In the marshy mists of a village churchyard, a    tiny orphan boy named Pip is suddenly terrified by a    shivering, limping convict on the run. Years    later, a supremely arrogant young Pip boards the coach    to London where, by the grace of a mysterious    benefactor, he will join the ranks of the idle rich    and " become a gentleman." Finally, in the    luminous mists of the village at evening, Pip the    man meets Estella, his dazzingly beautiful    tormentor, in a ruined garden--and lays to rest all the    heartaches and illusions that his " great    expectations" have brought upon him. Dickens's    biographer, Edgar H. Johnson, has said that--except    for the author's last-minute tampering with his    original ending--Great Expectations    is " the most perfectly constructed and    perfectly written of all Dickens's works." In John    Irving's Introduction to this edition, the    novelist takes the view that Dickens's revised ending is    " far more that mirror of the quality of trust in    the novel as a whole." Both versions of the    ending are printed here.

Synopsis:

"Great Expectations" is at once a superbly constructed novel of spellbinding mastery and a profound examination of moral values. Here, some of Dickens's most memorable characters come to play their part in a story whose title itself reflects the deep irony that shaped Dickens's searching reappraisal of the Victorian middle class.

About the Author

Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Portsmouth, England,where his father was a naval pay clerk. When he was five the family moved to Chatham, near Rochester, another port town. He received some education at a small private school but this was curtailed when his father's fortunes declined. More significant was his childhood reading, which he evoked in a memory of his father's library: 'From that blessed little room, Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, The Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas and Robinson Crusoe came out, a glorious host, to keep me company. They kept alive my fancy, and my hope of something beyond that place and time.'

When Dickens was ten the family moved to Camden Town, and this proved the beginning of a long, difficult period. (He wrote later of his coach journey, alone, to join his family at the new lodgings: 'I consumed my sandwiches in solitude and dreariness, and it rained hard all the way, and I thought life sloppier than I had expected to find it.') When he had just turned twelve Dickens was sent to work for a manufacturer of boot blacking, where for the better part of a year he labored for ten hours a day, an unhappy experience that instilled him with a sense of having been abandoned by his family: 'No advice, no counsel, no encouragement, no consolation, no support from anyone that I can call to mind, so help me God!' Around the same time Dickens's father was jailed for debt in the Marshalsea Prison, where he remained for fourteen weeks. After some additional schooling, Dickens worked as a clerk in a law office and taught himself shorthand; this qualified him to begin working in 1831 as a reporter in the House of Commons, where he was known for the speed with which he took down speeches.

By 1833 Dickens was publishing humorous sketches of London life in the Monthly Magazine, which were collected in book form as Sketches by 'Boz' (1836). These were followed by the publication in installments of the comic adventures that became The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1837), whose unprecedented popularity made the twenty-five-year-old author a national figure. In 1836 he married Catherine Hogarth, who would bear him ten children over a period of fifteen years. Dickens's energies enabled him to lead an active family and social life, including an indulgence in elaborate amateur theatricals, while maintaining a literary productiveness of astonishing proportions. He characteristically wrote his novels for serial publication, and was himself the editor of many of the periodicals—Bentley's Miscellany, The Daily News, Household Words, All the Year Round—in which they appeared. Among his close associates were his future biographer John Forster and the younger Wilkie Collins, with whom he collaborated on fictional and dramatic works. In rapid succession he published Oliver Twist (1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1839), The Old Curiosity Shop (1841), and Barnaby Rudge (1841), sometimes working on several novels simultaneously.

Dickens's celebrity led to a tour of the United States in 1842. There he met Longfellow, Irving, Bryant, and other literary figures, and was received with an enthusiasm that was dimmed somewhat by the criticisms Dickens expressed in his American Notes (1842) and in the American chapters of Martin Chuzzlewit (1844). The appearance of A Christmas Carol in 1843 sealed his position as the most widely popular writer of his time; it became an annual tradition for him to write a story for the season, of which the most memorable were The Chimes (1844) and The Cricket on the Hearth (1845). He continued to produce novels at only a slightly diminished rate, publishing Dombey and Son in 1848 and David Copperfield in 1850; of the latter, his personal favorite among his books, he wrote to Forster: 'If I were to say half of what Copperfield makes me feel tonight how strangely, even to you, I should be turned inside out! I seem to be sending some part of myself into the Shadowy World.'

From this point on his novels tended to be more elaborately constructed and harsher and less buoyant in tone than his earlier works. These late novels include Bleak House (1853), Hard Times (1854), Little Dorrit (1857), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), and Great Expectations (1861). Our Mutual Friend, published in 1865, was his last completed novel, and perhaps the most somber and savage of them all. Dickens had separated from his wife in 1858—he had become involved a year earlier with a young actress named Ellen Ternan—and the ensuing scandal had alienated him from many of his former associates and admirers. He was weakened by years of overwork and by a near-fatal railroad disaster during the writing of Our Mutual Friend. Nevertheless he embarked on a series of public readings, including a return visit to America in 1867, which further eroded his health. A final work, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, a crime novel much influenced by Wilkie Collins, was left unfinished upon his death on June 9,1870, at the age of 58.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

alyssaarch, January 8, 2012 (view all comments by alyssaarch)
Of all the works I have read by Dickens so far, Great Expectations is the best, hands down. The plot is interesting -- Pip falls in love with Estella when they are very young and develops "expectations" to be a gentleman so he can be worthy of her. Later on, he gets a sponsor who pays for him to become a gentleman. It's a typical coming of age story, focusing on Pip's growth and development and his realizations about the mistakes he's made in life. What makes this novel extraordinary is the characters. Each of them is complex and multi-dimensional, with full backgrounds and oddities that make them unique. Pip's brother-in-law Joe is by far one of my favorite characters of all time. Because the characterization is incredible, I was completely involved with this story, my emotions changing along with the novel's progression.

I'm not a fan of the tacked-on ending. All the characters got what they deserved, which I appreciated, but the last chapter felt especially rushed. However, the pacing for the rest of the novel was perfect, so I would say that this is a minor complaint.
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Emily Keeling, December 12, 2009 (view all comments by Emily Keeling)
Very possibly the most endearing novel ever written, this will delight readers.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780553213423
Introduction:
Irving, John
Author:
Irving, John
Author:
Dickens, Charles
Publisher:
Bantam Classics
Location:
New York ;
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Novels and novellas
Subject:
British and irish
Subject:
Young men
Subject:
Bildungsromane.
Subject:
England Social life and customs.
Subject:
Young men - England
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;victorian;british;dickens;british literature;english literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;bildungsroman;classic literature;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;victorian;british;dickens;british literature;english literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;bildungsroman;classic literature;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;british;victorian;dickens;british literature;english literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;bildungsroman;classic literature;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;victorian;british;dickens;british literature;english literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;classic literature;bildungsroman;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;victorian;british;dickens;british literature;english literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;classic literature;bildungsroman;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Subject:
fiction;classic;classics;literature;19th century;novel;england;victorian;british;dickens;english literature;british literature;english;coming of age;charles dickens;london;orphans;bildungsroman;classic literature;romance;historical fiction;britain;orphan;
Edition Description:
Mass market paperback
Series:
Bantam Classics
Series Volume:
v. 1
Publication Date:
19820831
Binding:
MASS MARKET
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
6.9 x 4.1 x .9 in .55 lb

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Great Expectations (81 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 560 pages Bantam Classics - English 9780553213423 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Great Expectations" is at once a superbly constructed novel of spellbinding mastery and a profound examination of moral values. Here, some of Dickens's most memorable characters come to play their part in a story whose title itself reflects the deep irony that shaped Dickens's searching reappraisal of the Victorian middle class.
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