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2 Burnside Psychology- General

How We Decide

by

How We Decide Cover

ISBN13: 9780618620111
ISBN10: 0618620117
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the acclaimed author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist, a fascinating look at the new science of decision-making and how it can help us make better choices. Since Plato, philosophers have described the decisionmaking process as either rational or emotional: we carefully deliberate or we blink and go with our gut. But as scientists break open the mind's black box with the latest tools of neuroscience, they're discovering that this is not how the mind works.

Our best decisions are a finely tuned blend of both feeling and reason — and the precise mix depends on the situation. When buying a house, for example, it's best to let our unconscious mull over the many variables. But when we're picking a stock, intuition often leads us astray. The trick is to determine when to lean on which part of the brain, and to do this, we need to think harder (and smarter) about how we think. Jonah Lehrer arms us with the tools we need, drawing on cutting-edge research by Daniel Kahneman, Colin Camerer, and others, as well as the real-world experiences of a wide range of deciders — from airplane pilots and hedge fund investors to serial killers and poker players.

Lehrer shows how people are taking advantage of the new science to make better television shows, win more football games, and improve military intelligence. His goal is to answer two questions that are of interest to just about anyone, from CEOs to firefighters: How does the human mind make decisions? And how can we make those decisions better?

Review:

"What is going on in the brain of a pilot deciding how to handle an emergency or a man trying to escape a wildfire? Does reason or emotion rule our decision making? Seed magazine editor-at-large Lehrer (Proust Was a Neuroscientist) brings recent research in neurobiology to life as he shows that the view, dating back to Plato, of the decision-making brain as a charioteer (reason) trying to control wild horses (emotions) comes up short. As Lehrer describes in fluid prose, the brain's reasoning centers are easily fooled, often making judgments based on nonrational factors like presentation (a sales pitch or packaging). And Lehrer cites a study of investors given varying amounts of financial data to show that our inner charioteer also can be confused by too much information. Even more surprisingly, research shows that 'gut instinct' often does make better decisions than long, drawn-out reasoning, and people with impaired emotional responses have trouble coping with the decisions required in everyday life. Lehrer is a delight to read, and this is a fascinating book (some of which appeared recently, in a slightly different form, in the New Yorker) that will help everyone better understand themselves and their decision making." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Imagine yourself in the place of Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger III, the pilot of US Airways flight 1549. A "double bird strike" has disabled your engines. You've asked an air controller to let you return to LaGuardia. You can head to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey, or you can try to glide over the George Washington Bridge and ditch your Airbus A320 in the Hudson River. How do you choose?

... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Should we go with instinct or analysis? The answer, Lehrer explains, in this smart and delightfully readable book, is that it depends on the situation. Knowing which method works best in which case is not just useful but fascinating. Lehrer proves once again that hes a master storyteller and one of the best guides to the practical lessons from new neuroscience." Chris Anderson, editor in chief of Wired and author of The Long Tail

Review:

"Cash or credit? Punt or go for first down? Deal or no deal? Life is filled with puzzling choices. Reporting from the frontiers of neuroscience and armed with riveting case studies of how pilots, quarterbacks, and others act under fire, Jonah Lehrer presents a dazzlingly authoritative and accessible account of how we make decisions, what's happening in our heads as we do so, and how we might all become better deciders. Luckily, this one's a no-brainer: Read this book." Tom Vanderbilt, author of Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us)

Review:

"Over the past two decades, research in neuroscience and behavioral economics has revolutionized our understanding of human decision making. Jonah Lehrer brings it all together in this insightful and enjoyable book, giving readers the information they need to make the smartest decisions." Antonio Damasio, author of Descartes Error and Looking for Spinoza

Review:

"Jonah Lehrer ingeniously weaves neuroscience, sports, war, psychology, and politics into a fascinating tale of human decision making. In the process, he makes us much wiser." Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational

Synopsis:

From the acclaimed author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist comes a fascinating look at the new science of decision-making. Lehrer explores two questions: How does the human mind make decisions? and How can those decisions be made better?

Synopsis:

A transformative guide that uses famous artwork to teach readers to be more perceptive, from an instructorand#160;whoandrsquo;s taught FBI interrogators with Matisse, high-powered CEOs with Picasso, and Secret Service agents with Lichtenstein.and#160;

Synopsis:

Itandrsquo;s not what you see, itandrsquo;s how you look.and#160;

Synopsis:

Could looking at Monetandrsquo;s water lily paintings save your company millions? Could studying Edward Hopperandrsquo;s Automat alert you to symptoms of your childandrsquo;s ADD or help identify the pickpocket who just lifted your wallet?

and#160;

Art historian Amy Herman has trained experts from many fields in the art of perception. By showing people how to look closely at extraordinary works of art, she enables them to see more clearly, analyze more intelligently, and use seemingly hidden clues to better understand any situation. She has spent over a decade teaching doctors to pay attention to patients instead of their charts, helping police officers separate facts from opinions when describing a suspect, and training professionals from a wide array of fields, including the FBI, the State Department, and the military, toand#160; recognize the most pertinent and useful information. Her lessons highlight far more than the physical objects you may be missing; they teach you to uncover the hidden talents of new employees, and to reduce costly miscommunication among members of a team.

and#160;

Whether youandrsquo;re an executive who wants to run your company more effectively, a parent who wants to better understand your child, or simply anyone who wants to perceive any situation more clearly, you will see what matters most in a whole new light.

and#160;

About the Author

Jonah Lehrer is editor at large for Seed magazine and the author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist (2007) and How We Decide (February 2009). A graduate of Columbia University and a Rhodes Scholar, Lehrer has worked in the lab of Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist Eric Kandel and has written for The New Yorker, Wired, Boston Globe, Washington Post, and Nature, and writes a highly regarded blog, The Frontal Cortex. Lehrer also commentates for NPR's "Radio Lab."

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Marie Godfrey, February 11, 2009 (view all comments by Marie Godfrey)
I sure hope this book is better than Blink. I read that one and kept hoping--unfulfilled--for some real ideas on how to make decisions. Lots of anecdotes and no substance.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 22 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618620111
Subtitle:
Sharpen Your Perception, Shift Your Focus, Change Your Life
Author:
Lehrer, Jonah
Author:
Herman, Amy E.
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Subject:
Decision-making
Subject:
General
Subject:
Decision Making & Problem Solving
Subject:
Motivational & Inspirational
Subject:
Cognitive Psychology
Subject:
Physiological Psychology
Subject:
General science
Subject:
Psychology-Cognitive Science
Subject:
Applied Psychology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20151006
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
30 color photographs and prints
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Strategy
Education » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Anatomy and Physiology
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Cognitive Science
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
History and Social Science » Economics » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Neurobiology
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General

How We Decide Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Houghton Mifflin Company - English 9780618620111 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "What is going on in the brain of a pilot deciding how to handle an emergency or a man trying to escape a wildfire? Does reason or emotion rule our decision making? Seed magazine editor-at-large Lehrer (Proust Was a Neuroscientist) brings recent research in neurobiology to life as he shows that the view, dating back to Plato, of the decision-making brain as a charioteer (reason) trying to control wild horses (emotions) comes up short. As Lehrer describes in fluid prose, the brain's reasoning centers are easily fooled, often making judgments based on nonrational factors like presentation (a sales pitch or packaging). And Lehrer cites a study of investors given varying amounts of financial data to show that our inner charioteer also can be confused by too much information. Even more surprisingly, research shows that 'gut instinct' often does make better decisions than long, drawn-out reasoning, and people with impaired emotional responses have trouble coping with the decisions required in everyday life. Lehrer is a delight to read, and this is a fascinating book (some of which appeared recently, in a slightly different form, in the New Yorker) that will help everyone better understand themselves and their decision making." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Should we go with instinct or analysis? The answer, Lehrer explains, in this smart and delightfully readable book, is that it depends on the situation. Knowing which method works best in which case is not just useful but fascinating. Lehrer proves once again that hes a master storyteller and one of the best guides to the practical lessons from new neuroscience."
"Review" by , "Cash or credit? Punt or go for first down? Deal or no deal? Life is filled with puzzling choices. Reporting from the frontiers of neuroscience and armed with riveting case studies of how pilots, quarterbacks, and others act under fire, Jonah Lehrer presents a dazzlingly authoritative and accessible account of how we make decisions, what's happening in our heads as we do so, and how we might all become better deciders. Luckily, this one's a no-brainer: Read this book."
"Review" by , "Over the past two decades, research in neuroscience and behavioral economics has revolutionized our understanding of human decision making. Jonah Lehrer brings it all together in this insightful and enjoyable book, giving readers the information they need to make the smartest decisions."
"Review" by , "Jonah Lehrer ingeniously weaves neuroscience, sports, war, psychology, and politics into a fascinating tale of human decision making. In the process, he makes us much wiser."
"Synopsis" by , From the acclaimed author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist comes a fascinating look at the new science of decision-making. Lehrer explores two questions: How does the human mind make decisions? and How can those decisions be made better?
"Synopsis" by ,
A transformative guide that uses famous artwork to teach readers to be more perceptive, from an instructorand#160;whoandrsquo;s taught FBI interrogators with Matisse, high-powered CEOs with Picasso, and Secret Service agents with Lichtenstein.and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,
Itandrsquo;s not what you see, itandrsquo;s how you look.and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,
Could looking at Monetandrsquo;s water lily paintings save your company millions? Could studying Edward Hopperandrsquo;s Automat alert you to symptoms of your childandrsquo;s ADD or help identify the pickpocket who just lifted your wallet?

and#160;

Art historian Amy Herman has trained experts from many fields in the art of perception. By showing people how to look closely at extraordinary works of art, she enables them to see more clearly, analyze more intelligently, and use seemingly hidden clues to better understand any situation. She has spent over a decade teaching doctors to pay attention to patients instead of their charts, helping police officers separate facts from opinions when describing a suspect, and training professionals from a wide array of fields, including the FBI, the State Department, and the military, toand#160; recognize the most pertinent and useful information. Her lessons highlight far more than the physical objects you may be missing; they teach you to uncover the hidden talents of new employees, and to reduce costly miscommunication among members of a team.

and#160;

Whether youandrsquo;re an executive who wants to run your company more effectively, a parent who wants to better understand your child, or simply anyone who wants to perceive any situation more clearly, you will see what matters most in a whole new light.

and#160;

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