We Need Diverse Ya Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | June 15, 2015

    Matthew Quick: IMG Portia Kane's '80s Metal Mix



    Two of Love May Fail's main characters, Portia Kane and Chuck Bass — now in their early 40s — still love the metal music that was... Continue »
    1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Love May Fail

      Matthew Quick 9780062285560

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$14.00
List price: $27.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
12 Partner Warehouse General- General

This title in other editions

How Sex Changed : History of Transsexuality in the United States (02 Edition)

by

How Sex Changed : History of Transsexuality in the United States (02 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

In the autumn of 2012, Maxim Februari—known until then as writer and philosopher Marjolijn Februari—announced his intention to live as a man. The news was greeted with a diversity of reactions, from curiosity to unease. These responses made it absolutely clear to Februari that most of us don’t know how to think about transsexuality. The Making of a Man explores this lacuna through a deeply personal meditation on a profoundly universal aspect of our identities.

Februari contemplates the many questions that sexual transitions entail: the clinical effects of testosterone, the alteration of sexual organs, and its effects on sexual intimacy; how transsexuality figures in the law; and how it challenges the way we talk about sex and gender, such as the seemingly minor—but crucially important—difference between the terms “transsexual” and “transgender.” He analyzes our impressions of effeminate men and butch women, separating apparent acceptance from actual prejudice, and critically examines the curious requirement in many countries that one must demonstrate a psychological disturbance—a “gender identity disorder”—in order to be granted sex change therapies. From there he explores the seemingly endless minutiae changing genders or sex effect, from the little box with an M or an F on passports to the shockingly sudden way testosterone can adjust physical features.

With his characteristically clear voice combined with intimate—sometimes moving, sometimes funny—ruminations, Februari wakes readers up to all the ways, big and small, our world is structured by sex and gender. 

Synopsis:

From early twentieth-century sex experiments in Europe, to the saga of Christine Jorgensen, whose sex-change surgery made headlines in 1952, to today's growing transgender movement, Meyerowitz gives us the first serious history of transsexuality. She focuses on the stories of transsexual men and women themselves, as well as a large supporting cast of doctors, scientists, journalists, lawyers, judges, feminists, and gay liberationists.

Synopsis:

In the autumn of 2012, Maxim Februari, known until then as writer and philosopher Marjolijn Februari, announced his intention to live as a man. In The Making of a Man he describes how the news was greeted: the unease, the interest, and the slightly too comradely tone in which people suddenly started to address him. Whatever the reaction, there was always an element of ignorance. Hardly anyone seemed to understand what a sex change actually involves or how best to react to it.

Februari analyzes our impressions of effeminate men and butch women, and examines apparent acceptance and actual prejudice. Curiously, to gain access to medical treatment you are required to demonstrate that you are psychologically disturbed—you need to be diagnosed as suffering from a “gender identity disorder”—and the book examines the implications of this requirement. Then there are the far-reaching demands of officialdom that must be met so that, for example, “you can go on holiday with a passport that gives your correct gender.”

Februaris account of his own transition is fascinating. Although the process of changing sex is of course a lengthy one, the outside world experiences it as a fairly abrupt switch. From one day to the next, as the testosterone took effect, Februari started to find himself addressed as a man rather than as a woman. “What had changed?” he asks himself. “In the intervening twenty-four hours I hadnt had a haircut, I wasnt wearing different clothes; it was just that the testosterone had altered the subtle signals by which my body suggested its sex.”

Februaris characteristically clear, philosophical voice, combined with his intimate, sometimes moving, sometimes funny experiences make this account unique. He analyzes and describes, charts and enquires. Above all, he makes us think.

Synopsis:

Honorable Mention, 2002 Sylvia Rivera Award in Transgender Studies, Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies

Synopsis:

2002 ForeWord Book of the Year, Gay/Lesbian Nonfiction Category

About the Author

Joanne Meyerowitz is Professor of History at Indiana University and Editor of the Journal of American History.

Indiana University

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. Sex Change

2. "Ex-Gi Becomes Blonde Beauty"

3. From Sex To Gender

4. A "Fierce And Demanding" Drive

5. Sexual Revolutions

6. The Liberal Moment

7. The Next Generation

Abbreviations

Notes

Acknowledgments

Illustration Credits

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674013797
Author:
Meyerowitz, Joanne
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Author:
Februari, Maxim
Author:
Brown, Andy
Location:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Subject:
Human Sexuality
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
Gender Studies-General
Subject:
PSYCHOLOGY / Human Sexuality
Subject:
History - United States/General
Subject:
Gay Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
April 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 halftones
Pages:
136
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5 in

Other books you might like

  1. Invisible Lives: The Erasure of... New Trade Paper $38.50
  2. Transgender Rights Used Trade Paper $11.00
  3. True Selves Used Trade Paper $9.95
  4. Crossdressing with Dignityc Used Trade Paper $10.50
  5. Conundrum Used Mass Market $4.95

Related Subjects

» BLOCKED
» Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
» History and Social Science » Gender Studies » General
» History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Transgender
» History and Social Science » World History » General
» Religion » Western Religions » Monastics

How Sex Changed : History of Transsexuality in the United States (02 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.00 In Stock
Product details 136 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674013797 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , From early twentieth-century sex experiments in Europe, to the saga of Christine Jorgensen, whose sex-change surgery made headlines in 1952, to today's growing transgender movement, Meyerowitz gives us the first serious history of transsexuality. She focuses on the stories of transsexual men and women themselves, as well as a large supporting cast of doctors, scientists, journalists, lawyers, judges, feminists, and gay liberationists.
"Synopsis" by ,

In the autumn of 2012, Maxim Februari, known until then as writer and philosopher Marjolijn Februari, announced his intention to live as a man. In The Making of a Man he describes how the news was greeted: the unease, the interest, and the slightly too comradely tone in which people suddenly started to address him. Whatever the reaction, there was always an element of ignorance. Hardly anyone seemed to understand what a sex change actually involves or how best to react to it.

Februari analyzes our impressions of effeminate men and butch women, and examines apparent acceptance and actual prejudice. Curiously, to gain access to medical treatment you are required to demonstrate that you are psychologically disturbed—you need to be diagnosed as suffering from a “gender identity disorder”—and the book examines the implications of this requirement. Then there are the far-reaching demands of officialdom that must be met so that, for example, “you can go on holiday with a passport that gives your correct gender.”

Februaris account of his own transition is fascinating. Although the process of changing sex is of course a lengthy one, the outside world experiences it as a fairly abrupt switch. From one day to the next, as the testosterone took effect, Februari started to find himself addressed as a man rather than as a woman. “What had changed?” he asks himself. “In the intervening twenty-four hours I hadnt had a haircut, I wasnt wearing different clothes; it was just that the testosterone had altered the subtle signals by which my body suggested its sex.”

Februaris characteristically clear, philosophical voice, combined with his intimate, sometimes moving, sometimes funny experiences make this account unique. He analyzes and describes, charts and enquires. Above all, he makes us think.

"Synopsis" by , Honorable Mention, 2002 Sylvia Rivera Award in Transgender Studies, Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies
"Synopsis" by , 2002 ForeWord Book of the Year, Gay/Lesbian Nonfiction Category
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.