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3 Burnside Children's Middle Readers- General

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Middle School Is Worse Than Meatloaf: A Year Told Through Stuff

by

Middle School Is Worse Than Meatloaf: A Year Told Through Stuff Cover

ISBN13: 9780689852817
ISBN10: 0689852819
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Ginny has ten items on her big to-do list for seventh grade. None of them, however, include accidentally turning her hair pink. Or getting sent to detention for throwing frogs in class. Or losing the lead role in the ballet recital to her ex-best friend. Or the thousand other things that can go wrong between September and June. But it looks like it's shaping up to be that kind of a year! Here's the story of one girl's worst school year ever — told completely through her stuff.

Review:

"'Two-time Newbery Honor author Holm (Our Only May Amelia) and Castaldi (Miss Polly Has a Dolly) gather an eclectic assemblage of 'stuff' to chronicle the intermittently bumpy year of a smart, sassy seventh grader. As the months pass, Ginny tackles an impressive to-do list. Among the entries: 'Get a dad' (she does, when her widowed mother remarries); 'Get the role of the Sugarplum Fairy' (she doesn't; worse, her former best friend — who never returned the sweater she borrowed — does); and 'Convince mom to let me go see Grampa Joe over Easter break' (he lives in Florida). Ginny also writes poems and IMs friends, and her older brother, Henry, draws a series of comics. The collages that make up the pages here look perky: appealing mixes of objects like bottle-cap linings and candy wrappers, or spreads that combine hair dye boxes, drugstore receipts, salon bills for 'color reversal' and a bank check to tell a story. But the inviting format disguises a darker side. Ginny worries, with cause, about Henry, who drinks and drives; resents her new stepfather's ways; and her normally excellent grades take an abrupt nosedive. The everyday tensions of seventh grade show up, too, via the ex — best friend and a pesky little brother. The punchy visuals and the sharp, funny details reel in the audience and don't let go. Ages 8-12. (July)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"

About the Author

andlt;bandgt;Jenni Holmandlt;/bandgt; is the Newbery Honor-winning author of andlt;iandgt;Our Only May Amelia, Penny from Heaven, Turtle in Paradise, andlt;/iandgt;and the BabyMouse graphic novel series. She lives in Northern California with her family.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Megan Robertson, June 8, 2008 (view all comments by Megan Robertson)
The dream book for a young adult who hates to read. Middle School is Worse than Meatloaf is a story told with no paragraphs and no dialog. Instead, it is told through the notes classed in pass, copies of her schedule and bank statements, party invitations, IM chats - all the bits and pieces of a young seventh grade girl's life. The reader wades through these artifacts and journeys through the ups and downs of middle school. Readers will laugh out loud at the hilarious haikus she has written for her English teacher and empathize for Ginny as she deals with a rebellious older brother and an annoying younger brother. By wandering through the artifacts of Ginny's year, young adults will be able to relate to the identity mystery that Ginny travels through and realize they may survive middle school too - even if it is worse than meatloaf.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780689852817
Author:
Holm, Jennifer L
Publisher:
Ginee Seo Books
Illustrator:
Castaldi, Elicia
Author:
Jennifer Holm
Author:
Holm, Jennifer L.
Author:
Castaldi, Elicia
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Middle schools
Subject:
Middle school students.
Subject:
Social Issues - Adolescence
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Family life
Subject:
Children s humor
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback - Paper Over Boards
Publication Date:
20070731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 3 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
f-c POB case+ f-c interior illustrations
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
8.25 x 6.5 in
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects


Children's » Humor
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Adolescence

Middle School Is Worse Than Meatloaf: A Year Told Through Stuff Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 128 pages Ginee Seo Books - English 9780689852817 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'Two-time Newbery Honor author Holm (Our Only May Amelia) and Castaldi (Miss Polly Has a Dolly) gather an eclectic assemblage of 'stuff' to chronicle the intermittently bumpy year of a smart, sassy seventh grader. As the months pass, Ginny tackles an impressive to-do list. Among the entries: 'Get a dad' (she does, when her widowed mother remarries); 'Get the role of the Sugarplum Fairy' (she doesn't; worse, her former best friend — who never returned the sweater she borrowed — does); and 'Convince mom to let me go see Grampa Joe over Easter break' (he lives in Florida). Ginny also writes poems and IMs friends, and her older brother, Henry, draws a series of comics. The collages that make up the pages here look perky: appealing mixes of objects like bottle-cap linings and candy wrappers, or spreads that combine hair dye boxes, drugstore receipts, salon bills for 'color reversal' and a bank check to tell a story. But the inviting format disguises a darker side. Ginny worries, with cause, about Henry, who drinks and drives; resents her new stepfather's ways; and her normally excellent grades take an abrupt nosedive. The everyday tensions of seventh grade show up, too, via the ex — best friend and a pesky little brother. The punchy visuals and the sharp, funny details reel in the audience and don't let go. Ages 8-12. (July)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"
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