Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 5, 2014

    William Gibson: IMG William Gibson: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$44.50
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse Anthropology- Cultural Anthropology

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History series:

Colonizing Hawai'i

by

Colonizing Hawai'i Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"This is an important study which details a crucial (and often ignored) chapter in American legal history. It stands to make an important contribution to the anthropology of law, to the history of colonial legality, and to the methodology of ethnography in the archives."--Annelise Riles, Cornell University

"This is a work of exceptional merit: substantively innovative and valuable, interpretively cogent and insightful, stylistically lucid and engaging. It reads very well as a significant account of the historical Hawaiian situation and as a major contribution to a multidimensional examination of colonial law and, especially, of a crucial and fairly singular American colonial enterprise."--Don Brenneis, University of California, Santa Cruz

Synopsis:

"This is an important study which details a crucial (and often ignored) chapter in American legal history. It stands to make an important contribution to the anthropology of law, to the history of colonial legality, and to the methodology of ethnography in the archives."--Annelise Riles, Cornell University

"This is a work of exceptional merit: substantively innovative and valuable, interpretively cogent and insightful, stylistically lucid and engaging. It reads very well as a significant account of the historical Hawaiian situation and as a major contribution to a multidimensional examination of colonial law and, especially, of a crucial and fairly singular American colonial enterprise."--Don Brenneis, University of California, Santa Cruz

Synopsis:

How does law transform family, sexuality, and community in the fractured social world characteristic of the colonizing process? The law was a cornerstone of the so-called civilizing process of nineteenth-century colonialism. It was simultaneously a means of transformation and a marker of the seductive idea of civilization. Sally Engle Merry reveals how, in Hawai'i, indigenous Hawaiian law was displaced by a transplanted Anglo-American law as global movements of capitalism, Christianity, and imperialism swept across the islands. The new law brought novel systems of courts, prisons, and conceptions of discipline and dramatically changed the marriage patterns, work lives, and sexual conduct of the indigenous people of Hawai'i.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-363) and index.

Table of Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ix
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xi
A NOTE ON LANGUAGE AND TERMINOLOGY xiii
ONE Introduction 3
PART ONE: ENCOUNTERS IN A CONTACT ZONE: NEW ENGLAND MISSIONARIES, LAWYERS, AND THE APPROPRIATION OF ANGLO-AMERICAN LAW, 1820-1852
TWO The Process of Legal Transformation 35
THREE The First Transition: Religious Law 63
FOUR The Second Transition: Secular Law 86
PART TWO: LOCAL PRACTICES OF POLICING AND JUDGING IN HILO, HAWAI'I
FIVE The Social History of a Plantation Town 117
Six Judges and Caseloads in Hilo 145
SEVEN Protest and the Law on the Hilo Sugar Plantations 207
EIGHT Sexuality, Marriage, and the Management of the Body 221
NINE Conclusions 258
APPENDIXES
A CASES FROM HILO DISTRICT COURT 269
B ACCOMPANYING TABLES 325
NOTES 331
REFERENCES 349
INDEX 365

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691009322
Author:
Merry, Sally Engle
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Hawaii
Subject:
Australia/Oceania - South Pacific
Subject:
Oceania
Subject:
Customary law
Subject:
Hawaiians
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Asian and Asian American Studies
Subject:
Postcolonial Studies
Subject:
Law
Subject:
Hawaiians -- Legal status, laws, etc.
Subject:
Hawaiians -- Government relations.
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History Paperback
Series Volume:
98-105
Publication Date:
December 1999
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
23 halftones 1 map 4 tables
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 23 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Dismembering Lahui: A History of the... Used Trade Paper $22.00
  2. Flexible Citizenship Used Trade Paper $14.00
  3. A Small Place Used Trade Paper $5.95
  4. Maneuvers: Intl. Politics of... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. Ecofeminism Used Trade Paper $7.95
  6. Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches... Used Trade Paper $10.50

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
History and Social Science » Americana » Hawaii
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Colonizing Hawai'i New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$44.50 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691009322 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This is an important study which details a crucial (and often ignored) chapter in American legal history. It stands to make an important contribution to the anthropology of law, to the history of colonial legality, and to the methodology of ethnography in the archives."--Annelise Riles, Cornell University

"This is a work of exceptional merit: substantively innovative and valuable, interpretively cogent and insightful, stylistically lucid and engaging. It reads very well as a significant account of the historical Hawaiian situation and as a major contribution to a multidimensional examination of colonial law and, especially, of a crucial and fairly singular American colonial enterprise."--Don Brenneis, University of California, Santa Cruz

"Synopsis" by , How does law transform family, sexuality, and community in the fractured social world characteristic of the colonizing process? The law was a cornerstone of the so-called civilizing process of nineteenth-century colonialism. It was simultaneously a means of transformation and a marker of the seductive idea of civilization. Sally Engle Merry reveals how, in Hawai'i, indigenous Hawaiian law was displaced by a transplanted Anglo-American law as global movements of capitalism, Christianity, and imperialism swept across the islands. The new law brought novel systems of courts, prisons, and conceptions of discipline and dramatically changed the marriage patterns, work lives, and sexual conduct of the indigenous people of Hawai'i.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.