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Other titles in the Princeton Studies in International History and Politics series:

From Wealth To Power (98 Edition)

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From Wealth To Power (98 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

What turns rich nations into great powers? How do wealthy countries begin extending their influence abroad? These questions are vital to understanding one of the most important sources of instability in international politics: the emergence of a new power. In From Wealth to Power, Fareed Zakaria seeks to answer these questions by examining the most puzzling case of a rising power in modern history--that of the United States.

If rich nations routinely become great powers, Zakaria asks, then how do we explain the strange inactivity of the United States in the late nineteenth century? By 1885, the U.S. was the richest country in the world. And yet, by all military, political, and diplomatic measures, it was a minor power. To explain this discrepancy, Zakaria considers a wide variety of cases between 1865 and 1908 when the U.S. considered expanding its influence in such diverse places as Canada, the Dominican Republic, and Iceland. Consistent with the realist theory of international relations, he argues that the President and his administration tried to increase the country's political influence abroad when they saw an increase in the nation's relative economic power. But they frequently had to curtail their plans for expansion, he shows, because they lacked a strong central government that could harness that economic power for the purposes of foreign policy. America was an unusual power--a strong nation with a weak state. It was not until late in the century, when power shifted from states to the federal government and from the legislative to the executive branch, that leaders in Washington could mobilize the nation's resources for international influence.

Zakaria's exploration of this tension between national power and state structure will change how we view the emergence of new powers and deepen our understanding of America's exceptional history.

Synopsis:

"Beautifully conceived; dazzlingly executed: Zakaria's theoretical penetration is matched by his mastery of the process of America's coming of age as a great power. The book casts a bright light on the past and the future--and the future of international politics."--Kenneth N. Waltz, Institute of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University

"The theory of state-centered realism set forth in From Wealth to Power is the most important innovation in foreign policy theory.... This book shows how theory and history can be combined to improve the former and illuminate the latter. It is a superb example of qualitative social science analysis."--Samuel P. Huntington, Director, John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, Harvard University

Synopsis:

What turns rich nations into great powers? How do wealthy countries begin extending their influence abroad? These questions are vital to understanding one of the most important sources of instability in international politics: the emergence of a new power. In From Wealth to Power, Fareed Zakaria seeks to answer these questions by examining the most puzzling case of a rising power in modern history--that of the United States.

If rich nations routinely become great powers, Zakaria asks, then how do we explain the strange inactivity of the United States in the late nineteenth century? By 1885, the U.S. was the richest country in the world. And yet, by all military, political, and diplomatic measures, it was a minor power. To explain this discrepancy, Zakaria considers a wide variety of cases between 1865 and 1908 when the U.S. considered expanding its influence in such diverse places as Canada, the Dominican Republic, and Iceland. Consistent with the realist theory of international relations, he argues that the President and his administration tried to increase the country's political influence abroad when they saw an increase in the nation's relative economic power. But they frequently had to curtail their plans for expansion, he shows, because they lacked a strong central government that could harness that economic power for the purposes of foreign policy. America was an unusual power--a strong nation with a weak state. It was not until late in the century, when power shifted from states to the federal government and from the legislative to the executive branch, that leaders in Washington could mobilize the nation's resources for international influence.

Zakaria's exploration of this tension between national power and state structure will change how we view the emergence of new powers and deepen our understanding of America's exceptional history.

Table of Contents

Chapter One Introduction: What Makes a Great Power? 3

Chapter Two A Theory of Foreign Policy: Why Do States Expand? 13

Chapter Three Imperial Understretch: Power and Nonexpansion, 1865-1889 44>

Chapter Four The Rise of the American State, 1877-1896: The Foundation for a New Foreign Policy 90

Chapter Five The New Diplomacy, 1889-1908: The Emergence of a Great Power 128

Chapter Six Conclusion: Strong Nation, Weak State 181

Index 193

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691010359
Author:
Zakaria, Fareed
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Zakaria, Far
Author:
eed
Location:
Princeton, N.J.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
U.S. Government
Subject:
Foreign relations
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
World history
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
United States Foreign relations 1865-1921.
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Paperback
Series Volume:
no. 752
Publication Date:
July 1999
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 tables 4 maps 1 line illus.
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 10 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Zoology » General

From Wealth To Power (98 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.00 In Stock
Product details 216 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691010359 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Beautifully conceived; dazzlingly executed: Zakaria's theoretical penetration is matched by his mastery of the process of America's coming of age as a great power. The book casts a bright light on the past and the future--and the future of international politics."--Kenneth N. Waltz, Institute of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University

"The theory of state-centered realism set forth in From Wealth to Power is the most important innovation in foreign policy theory.... This book shows how theory and history can be combined to improve the former and illuminate the latter. It is a superb example of qualitative social science analysis."--Samuel P. Huntington, Director, John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, Harvard University

"Synopsis" by , What turns rich nations into great powers? How do wealthy countries begin extending their influence abroad? These questions are vital to understanding one of the most important sources of instability in international politics: the emergence of a new power. In From Wealth to Power, Fareed Zakaria seeks to answer these questions by examining the most puzzling case of a rising power in modern history--that of the United States.

If rich nations routinely become great powers, Zakaria asks, then how do we explain the strange inactivity of the United States in the late nineteenth century? By 1885, the U.S. was the richest country in the world. And yet, by all military, political, and diplomatic measures, it was a minor power. To explain this discrepancy, Zakaria considers a wide variety of cases between 1865 and 1908 when the U.S. considered expanding its influence in such diverse places as Canada, the Dominican Republic, and Iceland. Consistent with the realist theory of international relations, he argues that the President and his administration tried to increase the country's political influence abroad when they saw an increase in the nation's relative economic power. But they frequently had to curtail their plans for expansion, he shows, because they lacked a strong central government that could harness that economic power for the purposes of foreign policy. America was an unusual power--a strong nation with a weak state. It was not until late in the century, when power shifted from states to the federal government and from the legislative to the executive branch, that leaders in Washington could mobilize the nation's resources for international influence.

Zakaria's exploration of this tension between national power and state structure will change how we view the emergence of new powers and deepen our understanding of America's exceptional history.

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