Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | August 8, 2014

Peter Mendelsund: IMG The Powell's Playlist: Water Music by Peter Mendelsund



We "see" when we read, and we "see" when we listen. There are many ways in which music can create the cross-sensory experience of this seeing...... Continue »
  1. $11.87 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$30.50
List price: $39.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Partner Warehouse Anthropology- General

More copies of this ISBN

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History series:

Charred Lullabies : Chapters in an Anthropography of Violence (96 Edition)

by

Charred Lullabies : Chapters in an Anthropography of Violence (96 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

How does an ethnographer write about violence? How can he make sense of violent acts, for himself and for his readers, without compromising its sheer excess and its meaning-defying core? How can he remain a scholarly observer when the country of his birth is engulfed by terror? These are some of the questions that engage Valentine Daniel in this exploration of life and death in contemporary Sri Lanka. In 1983 Daniel "walked into the ashes and mortal residue" of the violence that had occurred in his homeland. His planned project--the study of women's folk songs as ethnohistory--was immediately displaced by the responsibility that he felt had been given to him, by surviving family members and friends of victims, to recount beyond Sri Lanka what he had seen and heard there. Trained to do fieldwork by staying in one place and educated to look for coherence and meaning in human behavior, what does an anthropologist do when he is forced by circumstances to keep moving, searching for reasons he never finds? How does he write an ethnography (or an anthropography, to use the author's term) without transforming it into a pornography of violence? In avoiding fattening the anthropography into prurience, how does he avoid flattening it with theory? The ways in which Daniel grapples with these questions, and their answers, instill this groundbreaking book with a rare sense of passion, purpose, and intellect.

Synopsis:

"Without doubt one of the most important accounts of nationalist violence to be published in recent years. . . . Charred Lullabies is a major addition to the growing theoretical and ethnographic literature on contemporary political violence."--Amitav Ghosh

"E. Valentine Daniel does not wallow in the negations of terror; he finds a place somewhere between sensation and detachment from which to show how the wounded return to speech--even poetry. In the process, he is drawn to reflect on the place of violence in our modern understanding of culture writ large, producing an account of unusual insight and troubling beauty."--Jean Comaroff, University of Chicago

Synopsis:

How does an ethnographer write about violence? How can he make sense of violent acts, for himself and for his readers, without compromising its sheer excess and its meaning-defying core? How can he remain a scholarly observer when the country of his birth is engulfed by terror? These are some of the questions that engage Valentine Daniel in this exploration of life and death in contemporary Sri Lanka. In 1983 Daniel "walked into the ashes and mortal residue" of the violence that had occurred in his homeland. His planned project--the study of women's folk songs as ethnohistory--was immediately displaced by the responsibility that he felt had been given to him, by surviving family members and friends of victims, to recount beyond Sri Lanka what he had seen and heard there. Trained to do fieldwork by staying in one place and educated to look for coherence and meaning in human behavior, what does an anthropologist do when he is forced by circumstances to keep moving, searching for reasons he never finds? How does he write an ethnography (or an anthropography, to use the author's term) without transforming it into a pornography of violence? In avoiding fattening the anthropography into prurience, how does he avoid flattening it with theory? The ways in which Daniel grapples with these questions, and their answers, instill this groundbreaking book with a rare sense of passion, purpose, and intellect.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [231]-239) and index.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Notes on Transliteration
Introduction3
1Of Heritage and History13
2History's Entailments in the Violence of a Nation43
3Violent Measures, Measured Violence72
4Mood, Moment, and Mind104
5Embodied Terror135
6Suffering Nation and Alienation154
7Crushed Glass: A Counterpoint to Culture194
Notes213
Glossary of Frequently Used Terms and Abbreviations229
References231
Index241

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691027739
Author:
Daniel, E. Valentine
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
Sri lanka
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
Conflict Resolution
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Violence
Subject:
Sri Lanka Politics and government 1978-
Subject:
Ethnology -- Sri Lanka -- Philosophy.
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Violence in Society
Subject:
Asian and Asian American Studies
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Sri Lanka Ethnic relations.
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History Paperback
Series Volume:
SP-520
Publication Date:
November 1996
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 maps 2 line illus.
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 14 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Things as They Are: New Directions... New Trade Paper $33.75
  2. History of Anthropology #8:... New Trade Paper $32.95
  3. Sex and Repression in Savage Society... Used Trade Paper $18.00
  4. White Saris and Sweet Mangoes Used Trade Paper $18.50
  5. Shattering Silence: Women,... Used Trade Paper $10.95
  6. Power and Innocence: A Search for... Used Hardcover $3.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Violence in Society

Charred Lullabies : Chapters in an Anthropography of Violence (96 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691027739 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Without doubt one of the most important accounts of nationalist violence to be published in recent years. . . . Charred Lullabies is a major addition to the growing theoretical and ethnographic literature on contemporary political violence."--Amitav Ghosh

"E. Valentine Daniel does not wallow in the negations of terror; he finds a place somewhere between sensation and detachment from which to show how the wounded return to speech--even poetry. In the process, he is drawn to reflect on the place of violence in our modern understanding of culture writ large, producing an account of unusual insight and troubling beauty."--Jean Comaroff, University of Chicago

"Synopsis" by , How does an ethnographer write about violence? How can he make sense of violent acts, for himself and for his readers, without compromising its sheer excess and its meaning-defying core? How can he remain a scholarly observer when the country of his birth is engulfed by terror? These are some of the questions that engage Valentine Daniel in this exploration of life and death in contemporary Sri Lanka. In 1983 Daniel "walked into the ashes and mortal residue" of the violence that had occurred in his homeland. His planned project--the study of women's folk songs as ethnohistory--was immediately displaced by the responsibility that he felt had been given to him, by surviving family members and friends of victims, to recount beyond Sri Lanka what he had seen and heard there. Trained to do fieldwork by staying in one place and educated to look for coherence and meaning in human behavior, what does an anthropologist do when he is forced by circumstances to keep moving, searching for reasons he never finds? How does he write an ethnography (or an anthropography, to use the author's term) without transforming it into a pornography of violence? In avoiding fattening the anthropography into prurience, how does he avoid flattening it with theory? The ways in which Daniel grapples with these questions, and their answers, instill this groundbreaking book with a rare sense of passion, purpose, and intellect.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.