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Inequality By Design : Cracking the Bell Curve Myth (96 Edition)

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Publisher Comments:

As debate rages over the widening and destructive gap between the rich and the rest of Americans, Claude Fischer and his colleagues present a comprehensive new treatment of inequality in America. They challenge arguments that expanding inequality is the natural, perhaps necessary, accompaniment of economic growth. They refute the claims of the incendiary bestseller The Bell Curve (1994) through a clear, rigorous re-analysis of the very data its authors, Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, used to contend that inherited differences in intelligence explain inequality. Inequality by Design offers a powerful alternative explanation, stressing that economic fortune depends more on social circumstances than on IQ, which is itself a product of society. More critical yet, patterns of inequality must be explained by looking beyond the attributes of individuals to the structure of society. Social policies set the "rules of the game" within which individual abilities and efforts matter. And recent policies have, on the whole, widened the gap between the rich and the rest of Americans since the 1970s.

Not only does the wealth of individuals' parents shape their chances for a good life, so do national policies ranging from labor laws to investments in education to tax deductions. The authors explore the ways that America--the most economically unequal society in the industrialized world--unevenly distributes rewards through regulation of the market, taxes, and government spending. It attacks the myth that inequality fosters economic growth, that reducing economic inequality requires enormous welfare expenditures, and that there is little we can do to alter the extent of inequality. It also attacks the injurious myth of innate racial inequality, presenting powerful evidence that racial differences in achievement are the consequences, not the causes, of social inequality. By refusing to blame inequality on an unchangeable human nature and an inexorable market--an excuse that leads to resignation and passivity--Inequality by Design shows how we can advance policies that widen opportunity for all.

Synopsis:

"The authors of this compelling new study rebut the wrong-headed work of Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein by mobilizing powerful evidence to demonstrate that inequality is a structural problem, not a hereditary condition?. One of the most important books on what divides America socially and economically since the work of Christopher Jencks and his Harvard colleagues nearly a quarter century ago."--Daniel Bell

Synopsis:

As debate rages over the widening and destructive gap between the rich and the rest of Americans, Claude Fischer and his colleagues present a comprehensive new treatment of inequality in America. They challenge arguments that expanding inequality is the natural, perhaps necessary, accompaniment of economic growth. They refute the claims of the incendiary bestseller The Bell Curve (1994) through a clear, rigorous re-analysis of the very data its authors, Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, used to contend that inherited differences in intelligence explain inequality. Inequality by Design offers a powerful alternative explanation, stressing that economic fortune depends more on social circumstances than on IQ, which is itself a product of society. More critical yet, patterns of inequality must be explained by looking beyond the attributes of individuals to the structure of society. Social policies set the "rules of the game" within which individual abilities and efforts matter. And recent policies have, on the whole, widened the gap between the rich and the rest of Americans since the 1970s.

Not only does the wealth of individuals' parents shape their chances for a good life, so do national policies ranging from labor laws to investments in education to tax deductions. The authors explore the ways that America--the most economically unequal society in the industrialized world--unevenly distributes rewards through regulation of the market, taxes, and government spending. It attacks the myth that inequality fosters economic growth, that reducing economic inequality requires enormous welfare expenditures, and that there is little we can do to alter the extent of inequality. It also attacks the injurious myth of innate racial inequality, presenting powerful evidence that racial differences in achievement are the consequences, not the causes, of social inequality. By refusing to blame inequality on an unchangeable human nature and an inexorable market--an excuse that leads to resignation and passivity--Inequality by Design shows how we can advance policies that widen opportunity for all.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 277-302) and index.

Table of Contents

Figures and Tables ix

Preface xi

CHAPTER 1 Why Inequality? 3

CHAPTER 2 Understanding "Intelligence" 22

CHAPTER 3 But Is It Intelligence? 55

CHAPTER 4 Who Wins? Who Loses? 70

CHAPTER 5 The Rewards of the Game: Systems of Inequality 102

CHAPTER 6 HOW Unequal? America's Invisible Policy Choices

CHAPTER 7 Enriching Intelligence: More Policy Choices 158

CHAPTER 8 Confronting Inequality in America: The Power of Public Investment 204

APPENDIX 1 Summary of The Bell Curve 217

APPENDIX 2 Statistical Analysis for Chapter 4 225

Notes 241

References 277

Index 303

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691028989
With:
Swidler, Ann
With:
Lucas, Samuel R.
With:
Swidler, Ann
Author:
ischer, Claude S.
Author:
Voss, Kim
Author:
Hout, Michael
Author:
F .
Author:
Fischer, Claude S.
Author:
Swidler, Ann
Author:
Jankowski, Martin Sanchez
Author:
Jankowski, Martn Snchez
Author:
Lucas, Samuel R.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, NJ :
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Methodology
Subject:
Educational Psychology
Subject:
Intellect
Subject:
Intelligence levels
Subject:
Nature and nurture
Subject:
Herrnstein, Richard J
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Economics
Subject:
Education
Subject:
Higher education
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
1856
Publication Date:
July 1996
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
13 tables 25 line drawings 20 figs.
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 16 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Cognitive Science
History and Social Science » American Studies » Culture Wars
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Culture
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Reference and Methodology

Inequality By Design : Cracking the Bell Curve Myth (96 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 384 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691028989 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "The authors of this compelling new study rebut the wrong-headed work of Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein by mobilizing powerful evidence to demonstrate that inequality is a structural problem, not a hereditary condition?. One of the most important books on what divides America socially and economically since the work of Christopher Jencks and his Harvard colleagues nearly a quarter century ago."--Daniel Bell
"Synopsis" by , As debate rages over the widening and destructive gap between the rich and the rest of Americans, Claude Fischer and his colleagues present a comprehensive new treatment of inequality in America. They challenge arguments that expanding inequality is the natural, perhaps necessary, accompaniment of economic growth. They refute the claims of the incendiary bestseller The Bell Curve (1994) through a clear, rigorous re-analysis of the very data its authors, Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray, used to contend that inherited differences in intelligence explain inequality. Inequality by Design offers a powerful alternative explanation, stressing that economic fortune depends more on social circumstances than on IQ, which is itself a product of society. More critical yet, patterns of inequality must be explained by looking beyond the attributes of individuals to the structure of society. Social policies set the "rules of the game" within which individual abilities and efforts matter. And recent policies have, on the whole, widened the gap between the rich and the rest of Americans since the 1970s.

Not only does the wealth of individuals' parents shape their chances for a good life, so do national policies ranging from labor laws to investments in education to tax deductions. The authors explore the ways that America--the most economically unequal society in the industrialized world--unevenly distributes rewards through regulation of the market, taxes, and government spending. It attacks the myth that inequality fosters economic growth, that reducing economic inequality requires enormous welfare expenditures, and that there is little we can do to alter the extent of inequality. It also attacks the injurious myth of innate racial inequality, presenting powerful evidence that racial differences in achievement are the consequences, not the causes, of social inequality. By refusing to blame inequality on an unchangeable human nature and an inexorable market--an excuse that leads to resignation and passivity--Inequality by Design shows how we can advance policies that widen opportunity for all.

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