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4 Remote Warehouse World History- Ireland

Shattering Silence: Women, Nationalism, and Political Subjectivity in Northern Ireland

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Shattering Silence: Women, Nationalism, and Political Subjectivity in Northern Ireland Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This book, the first feminist ethnography of the violence in Northern Ireland, is an analysis of a political conflict through the lens of gender. The case in point is the working-class Catholic resistance to British rule in Northern Ireland. During the 1970s women in Catholic/nationalist districts of Belfast organized themselves into street committees and led popular forms of resistance against the policies of the government of Northern Ireland and, after its demise, against those of the British. In the abundant literature on the conflict, however, the political tactics of nationalist women have passed virtually unnoticed. Begoña Aretxaga argues here that these hitherto invisible practices were an integral part of the social dynamic of the conflict and had important implications for the broader organization of nationalist forms of resistance and gender relationships.

Combining interpretative anthropology and poststructuralist feminist theory, Aretxaga contributes not only to anthropology and feminist studies but also to research on ethnic and social conflict by showing the gendered constitution of political violence. She goes further than asserting that violence affects men and women differently by arguing that the manners in which violence is gendered are not fixed but constantly shifting, depending on the contingencies of history, social class, and ethnic identity. Thus any attempt at subverting gender inequality is necessarily colored by other dimensions of political experience.

Synopsis:

"Begoña Aretxaga provides a forceful voice in ongoing debates, presenting ethnographically and historiographically the gendering of violence that has accompanied the civil war in Northern Ireland.... There is an integrity and passion in Aretxaga's analysis."--Joan Vincent, Barnard College

Synopsis:

This book, the first feminist ethnography of the violence in Northern Ireland, is an analysis of a political conflict through the lens of gender. The case in point is the working-class Catholic resistance to British rule in Northern Ireland. During the 1970s women in Catholic/nationalist districts of Belfast organized themselves into street committees and led popular forms of resistance against the policies of the government of Northern Ireland and, after its demise, against those of the British. In the abundant literature on the conflict, however, the political tactics of nationalist women have passed virtually unnoticed. Begoña Aretxaga argues here that these hitherto invisible practices were an integral part of the social dynamic of the conflict and had important implications for the broader organization of nationalist forms of resistance and gender relationships.

Combining interpretative anthropology and poststructuralist feminist theory, Aretxaga contributes not only to anthropology and feminist studies but also to research on ethnic and social conflict by showing the gendered constitution of political violence. She goes further than asserting that violence affects men and women differently by arguing that the manners in which violence is gendered are not fixed but constantly shifting, depending on the contingencies of history, social class, and ethnic identity. Thus any attempt at subverting gender inequality is necessarily colored by other dimensions of political experience.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-200) and index.

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1Opening the Space of Interpretation3
Ch. 2Catholic West Belfast: A Sense of Place24
Ch. 3Gender Trouble and the Transformation of Consciousness54
Ch. 4The Ritual Politics of Historical Legitimacy80
Ch. 5The Gendered Politics of Suffering: Women of the RAC105
Ch. 6The Power of Sexual Difference: Armagh Women122
Ch. 7En-Gendering a Nation146
Afterword170
Notes177
References185
Index201

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691037547
Author:
Aretxaga, Begona
Author:
Aretxaga, Begoona
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, NJ :
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Ireland
Subject:
Europe - Ireland
Subject:
Women in politics
Subject:
Belfast
Subject:
Nationalism
Subject:
Northern Ireland
Subject:
Women political activists
Subject:
Belfast (Northern Ireland) Politics and government.
Subject:
Women political activists -- Northern Ireland -- Belfast.
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
Postcolonial Studies
Subject:
Northern Ireland Politics and government.
Subject:
Belfast (Northern Ireland)
Subject:
World History-Ireland
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
51
Publication Date:
September 1997
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
15 halftones 1 map
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 11 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » Europe » Ireland » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ireland
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Modeling

Shattering Silence: Women, Nationalism, and Political Subjectivity in Northern Ireland New Trade Paper
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Product details 208 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691037547 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Begoña Aretxaga provides a forceful voice in ongoing debates, presenting ethnographically and historiographically the gendering of violence that has accompanied the civil war in Northern Ireland.... There is an integrity and passion in Aretxaga's analysis."--Joan Vincent, Barnard College
"Synopsis" by , This book, the first feminist ethnography of the violence in Northern Ireland, is an analysis of a political conflict through the lens of gender. The case in point is the working-class Catholic resistance to British rule in Northern Ireland. During the 1970s women in Catholic/nationalist districts of Belfast organized themselves into street committees and led popular forms of resistance against the policies of the government of Northern Ireland and, after its demise, against those of the British. In the abundant literature on the conflict, however, the political tactics of nationalist women have passed virtually unnoticed. Begoña Aretxaga argues here that these hitherto invisible practices were an integral part of the social dynamic of the conflict and had important implications for the broader organization of nationalist forms of resistance and gender relationships.

Combining interpretative anthropology and poststructuralist feminist theory, Aretxaga contributes not only to anthropology and feminist studies but also to research on ethnic and social conflict by showing the gendered constitution of political violence. She goes further than asserting that violence affects men and women differently by arguing that the manners in which violence is gendered are not fixed but constantly shifting, depending on the contingencies of history, social class, and ethnic identity. Thus any attempt at subverting gender inequality is necessarily colored by other dimensions of political experience.

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