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Indigenous Movements and Their Critics : Pan-maya Activism in Guatemala (98 Edition)

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Publisher Comments:

In this first book-length treatment of Maya intellectuals in national and community affairs in Guatemala, Kay Warren presents an ethnographic account of Pan-Maya cultural activism through the voices, writings, and actions of its participants. Challenging the belief that indigenous movements emerge as isolated, politically unified fronts, she shows that Pan-Mayanism reflects diverse local, national, and international influences. She explores the movement's attempts to interweave these varied strands into political programs to promote human and cultural rights for Guatemala's indigenous majority and also examines the movement's many domestic and foreign critics.

The book focuses on the years of Guatemala's peace process (1987--1996). After the previous ten years of national war and state repression, the Maya movement reemerged into public view to press for institutional reform in the schools and courts and for the officialization of a "multicultural, ethnically plural, and multilingual" national culture. In particular, Warren examines a group of well-known Mayanist antiracism activists--among them, Demetrio Cojt!, Mart!n Chacach, Enrique Sam Colop, Victor Montejo, members of Oxlajuuj Keej Maya' Ajtz'iib', and grassroots intellectuals in the community of San Andr s--to show what is at stake for them personally and how they have worked to promote the revitalization of Maya language and culture. Pan-Mayanism's critics question its tactics, see it as threatening their own achievements, or even as dangerously polarizing national society. This book highlights the crucial role that Mayanist intellectuals have come to play in charting paths to multicultural democracy in Guatemala and in creating a new parallel middle class.

Synopsis:

In this first book-length treatment of Maya intellectuals in national and community affairs in Guatemala, Kay Warren presents an ethnographic account of Pan-Maya cultural activism through the voices, writings, and actions of its participants. Challenging the belief that indigenous movements emerge as isolated, politically unified fronts, she shows that Pan-Mayanism reflects diverse local, national, and international influences. She explores the movement's attempts to interweave these varied strands into political programs to promote human and cultural rights for Guatemala's indigenous majority and also examines the movement's many domestic and foreign critics.

The book focuses on the years of Guatemala's peace process (1987--1996). After the previous ten years of national war and state repression, the Maya movement reemerged into public view to press for institutional reform in the schools and courts and for the officialization of a "multicultural, ethnically plural, and multilingual" national culture. In particular, Warren examines a group of well-known Mayanist antiracism activists--among them, Demetrio Cojt!, Mart!n Chacach, Enrique Sam Colop, Victor Montejo, members of Oxlajuuj Keej Maya' Ajtz'iib', and grassroots intellectuals in the community of San Andr s--to show what is at stake for them personally and how they have worked to promote the revitalization of Maya language and culture. Pan-Mayanism's critics question its tactics, see it as threatening their own achievements, or even as dangerously polarizing national society. This book highlights the crucial role that Mayanist intellectuals have come to play in charting paths to multicultural democracy in Guatemala and in creating a new parallel middle class.

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Transcription of Maya Languages and Personal Names
Introduction: Democracy, Marginality, and Ethnic Resurgence3
1Pan-Mayanism and Its Critics on Left and Right33
2Coalitions and the Peace Process52
3In Dialogue: Maya Skeptics and One Anthropologist69
4Civil War: Enemies Without and Within86
5Narrating Survival through Eyewitness Testimony113
6Interrogating Official History132
7Finding Oneself in a Sixteenth-century Chronicle of Conquest148
8"Each Mind Is a World": Person, Authority, and Community163
9Indigenous Activism across Generations177
Conclusions: Tracing the "Invisible Thread of Ethnicity"194
App. 1Summary of the Accord on Identity and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples211
App. 2Questions from the 1989 Maya Workshop Directed to Foreign Linguists215
Glossary: Acronyms, Organizations, and Cultural Terms217
Notes221
Bibliography251
Index281

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691058825
Author:
Warren, Kay B.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, NJ :
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Central America
Subject:
Mayas
Subject:
Indians of central america
Subject:
Guatemala
Subject:
Guatemala Politics and government 1985-
Subject:
Mayas -- Guatemala -- Ethnic identity.
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Latin America - Central America
Subject:
Latin American studies
Subject:
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala.
Subject:
Latin americans
Subject:
tudies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
December 1998
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 table 2 maps 19 line illus. 56 halfton
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 17 oz

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Related Subjects

» History and Social Science » Anthropology » Central and South America
» History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
» History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
» History and Social Science » Politics » General
» History and Social Science » Sociology » General
» History and Social Science » World History » Central America

Indigenous Movements and Their Critics : Pan-maya Activism in Guatemala (98 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 336 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691058825 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this first book-length treatment of Maya intellectuals in national and community affairs in Guatemala, Kay Warren presents an ethnographic account of Pan-Maya cultural activism through the voices, writings, and actions of its participants. Challenging the belief that indigenous movements emerge as isolated, politically unified fronts, she shows that Pan-Mayanism reflects diverse local, national, and international influences. She explores the movement's attempts to interweave these varied strands into political programs to promote human and cultural rights for Guatemala's indigenous majority and also examines the movement's many domestic and foreign critics.

The book focuses on the years of Guatemala's peace process (1987--1996). After the previous ten years of national war and state repression, the Maya movement reemerged into public view to press for institutional reform in the schools and courts and for the officialization of a "multicultural, ethnically plural, and multilingual" national culture. In particular, Warren examines a group of well-known Mayanist antiracism activists--among them, Demetrio Cojt!, Mart!n Chacach, Enrique Sam Colop, Victor Montejo, members of Oxlajuuj Keej Maya' Ajtz'iib', and grassroots intellectuals in the community of San Andr s--to show what is at stake for them personally and how they have worked to promote the revitalization of Maya language and culture. Pan-Mayanism's critics question its tactics, see it as threatening their own achievements, or even as dangerously polarizing national society. This book highlights the crucial role that Mayanist intellectuals have come to play in charting paths to multicultural democracy in Guatemala and in creating a new parallel middle class.

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