The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer

On Order

$47.95
New Trade Paper
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Law- Legal Guides and Reference

Regulation and Public Interests: The Possibility of Good Regulatory Government

by

Regulation and Public Interests: The Possibility of Good Regulatory Government Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Not since the 1960s have U.S. politicians, Republican or Democrat, campaigned on platforms defending big government, much less the use of regulation to help solve social ills. And since the late 1970s, "deregulation" has become perhaps the most ubiquitous political catchword of all. This book takes on the critics of government regulation. Providing the first major alternative to conventional arguments grounded in public choice theory, it demonstrates that regulatory government can, and on important occasions does, advance general interests.

Unlike previous accounts, Regulation and Public Interests takes agencies' decision-making rules rather than legislative incentives as a central determinant of regulatory outcomes. Drawing from both political science and law, Steven Croley argues that such rules, together with agencies' larger decision-making environments, enhance agency autonomy. Agency personnel inclined to undertake regulatory initiatives that generate large but diffuse benefits (while imposing smaller but more concentrated costs) can use decision-making rules to develop socially beneficial regulations even over the objections of Congress and influential interest groups. This book thus provides a qualified defense of regulatory government. Its illustrative case studies include the development of tobacco rulemaking by the Food and Drug Administration, ozone and particulate matter rules by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service's "roadless" policy for national forests, and regulatory initiatives by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.

Synopsis:

"This valuable book thoroughly documents the public choice critique against government regulation working well. The net result is that the reader has the impression of having done battle with this standard argument about why regulation can't work well, and then seen compelling evidence that it can. The presentation is solid and engaging."--Paul Teske, University of Colorado at Denver

"This book marks the first extended effort to develop a full-fledged alternative theory of why the existing regulatory state--to which we, as a nation, are clearly and probably irrevocably committed--might indeed be capable of furthering the public interest."--Cynthia Farina, Cornell University Law School

"Steven Croley . . . has written an ambitious and valuable book. It offers a strong defense of the American regulatory state and the role of administrative procedure in encouraging good regulatory governance. The book should be illuminating and useful for political scientists and legal scholars interested in regulatory policy, the politics of regulation, public administration, and administrative law. Regulation And Public Interests would be an excellent book for graduate courses in any of those fields."--Robert A. Kagan, Department of Political Science and School of Law, University of California, Berkeley

Synopsis:

Not since the 1960s have U.S. politicians, Republican or Democrat, campaigned on platforms defending big government, much less the use of regulation to help solve social ills. And since the late 1970s, "deregulation" has become perhaps the most ubiquitous political catchword of all. This book takes on the critics of government regulation. Providing the first major alternative to conventional arguments grounded in public choice theory, it demonstrates that regulatory government can, and on important occasions does, advance general interests.

Unlike previous accounts, Regulation and Public Interests takes agencies' decision-making rules rather than legislative incentives as a central determinant of regulatory outcomes. Drawing from both political science and law, Steven Croley argues that such rules, together with agencies' larger decision-making environments, enhance agency autonomy. Agency personnel inclined to undertake regulatory initiatives that generate large but diffuse benefits (while imposing smaller but more concentrated costs) can use decision-making rules to develop socially beneficial regulations even over the objections of Congress and influential interest groups. This book thus provides a qualified defense of regulatory government. Its illustrative case studies include the development of tobacco rulemaking by the Food and Drug Administration, ozone and particulate matter rules by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service's "roadless" policy for national forests, and regulatory initiatives by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.

About the Author

Steven P. Croley is professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School. He earned a J.D. from Yale Law School and a Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction: An Uneasy Commitment to Regulatory Government 1

PART I: THE CYNICAL VIEW OF REGULATORY GOVERNMENT, AND ITS ALTERNATIVES 7

Chapter One; The Basic Project 9

Chapter Two: The Cynical View of Regulation 14

Chapter Three: Is Regulatory Capture Inevitable? 26

Chapter Four: Alternative Visions of Regulatory Government 53

PART II: THE ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATORY STATE 77

Chapter Five: Opening the Black Box: Regulatory Decisionmaking in Legal Context 81

Chapter Six: Regulatory Government as Administrative Government 102

Chapter Seven: Participation in Administrative Decisionmaking 118

Chapter Eight: The Administrative-Process Approach Expanded: A More Developed Picture 134

PART III: PUBLIC INTERESTED REGULATION 157

Chapter Nine: The Environmental Protection Agency's Ozone and Particulate Matter Rules 163

Chapter Ten: The Food and Drug Administration's Tobacco Initiative 180

Chapter Eleven: The Forest Service's Roadless Policy for National Forests 196

Chapter Twelve: Socially Beneficial Administrative Decisionmaking: Additional Evidence 213

PART IV: PUBLIC CHOICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESS 237

Chapter Thirteen: The Public Choice Theory Revisited 241

Chapter Fourteen: The Promise of an Administrative-Process Orientation 258

Chapter Fifteen: Regulatory Rents, Regulatory Failures, and Other Objections 284

Conclusion: The Regulatory State and Social Welfare 304

Notes 307

Index 365

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691134642
Author:
Croley, Steven P.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Croley, Steven
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Public Affairs & Administration
Subject:
Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice
Subject:
Trade regulation
Subject:
Social choice
Subject:
Law
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Law-Legal Guides and Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
October 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 table.
Pages:
392
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Corporate Power and the Environment:... New Trade Paper $37.75
  2. Corporate America and Environmental... Used Trade Paper $14.00
  3. The Second Civil War: How Extreme... Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Topology

Regulation and Public Interests: The Possibility of Good Regulatory Government New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$47.95 Backorder
Product details 392 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691134642 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This valuable book thoroughly documents the public choice critique against government regulation working well. The net result is that the reader has the impression of having done battle with this standard argument about why regulation can't work well, and then seen compelling evidence that it can. The presentation is solid and engaging."--Paul Teske, University of Colorado at Denver

"This book marks the first extended effort to develop a full-fledged alternative theory of why the existing regulatory state--to which we, as a nation, are clearly and probably irrevocably committed--might indeed be capable of furthering the public interest."--Cynthia Farina, Cornell University Law School

"Steven Croley . . . has written an ambitious and valuable book. It offers a strong defense of the American regulatory state and the role of administrative procedure in encouraging good regulatory governance. The book should be illuminating and useful for political scientists and legal scholars interested in regulatory policy, the politics of regulation, public administration, and administrative law. Regulation And Public Interests would be an excellent book for graduate courses in any of those fields."--Robert A. Kagan, Department of Political Science and School of Law, University of California, Berkeley

"Synopsis" by , Not since the 1960s have U.S. politicians, Republican or Democrat, campaigned on platforms defending big government, much less the use of regulation to help solve social ills. And since the late 1970s, "deregulation" has become perhaps the most ubiquitous political catchword of all. This book takes on the critics of government regulation. Providing the first major alternative to conventional arguments grounded in public choice theory, it demonstrates that regulatory government can, and on important occasions does, advance general interests.

Unlike previous accounts, Regulation and Public Interests takes agencies' decision-making rules rather than legislative incentives as a central determinant of regulatory outcomes. Drawing from both political science and law, Steven Croley argues that such rules, together with agencies' larger decision-making environments, enhance agency autonomy. Agency personnel inclined to undertake regulatory initiatives that generate large but diffuse benefits (while imposing smaller but more concentrated costs) can use decision-making rules to develop socially beneficial regulations even over the objections of Congress and influential interest groups. This book thus provides a qualified defense of regulatory government. Its illustrative case studies include the development of tobacco rulemaking by the Food and Drug Administration, ozone and particulate matter rules by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service's "roadless" policy for national forests, and regulatory initiatives by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.