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Education for Extinction : American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928 (95 Edition)

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Education for Extinction : American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928 (95 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The last "Indian War" was fought against Native American children in the dormitories and classrooms of government boarding schools. Only by removing Indian children from their homes for extended periods of time, policymakers reasoned, could white "civilization" take root while childhood memories of "savagism" gradually faded to the point of extinction. In the words of one official: "Kill the Indian and save the man."

Education for Extinction offers the first comprehensive account of this dispiriting effort. Much more than a study of federal Indian policy, this book vividly details the day-to-day experiences of Indian youth living in a "total institution" designed to reconstruct them both psychologically and culturally. The assault on identity came in many forms: the shearing off of braids, the assignment of new names, uniformed drill routines, humiliating punishments, relentless attacks on native religious beliefs, patriotic indoctrinations, suppression of tribal languages, Victorian gender rituals, football contests, and industrial training.

Especially poignant is Adams's description of the ways in which students resisted or accommodated themselves to forced assimilation. Many converted to varying degrees, but others plotted escapes, committed arson, and devised ingenious strategies of passive resistance. Adams also argues that many of those who seemingly cooperated with the system were more than passive players in this drama, that the response of accommodation was not synonymous with cultural surrender. This is especially apparent in his analysis of students who returned to the reservation. He reveals the various ways in which graduates struggled to make sense of their lives and selectively drew upon their school experience in negotiating personal and tribal survival in a world increasingly dominated by white men.

The discussion comes full circle when Adams reviews the government's gradual retreat from the assimilationist vision. Partly because of persistent student resistance, but also partly because of a complex and sometimes contradictory set of progressive, humanitarian, and racist motivations, policymakers did eventually come to view boarding schools less enthusiastically

Based upon extensive use of government archives, Indian and teacher autobiographies, and school newspapers, Adams's moving account is essential reading for scholars and general readers alike interested in Western history, Native American studies, American race relations, education history, and multiculturalism.

Synopsis:

"This is, quite simply, a wonderful book. In lively prose, Adams tells the poignant story of the relentless war against American Indian children. It is a tale about policy makers who sought to use boarding schools as an instrument for transforming Indian youth to 'American' ways of thinking, doing, and living. Adams demonstrates convincingly that Native American students were anything but passive recipients of the 'curriculum of civilization.' Recommended for all levels". — Choice<P>"Everything is here: the cropped hair and army uniforms, the endless drilling and marching, the round of daily chores, the spells in the guardhouse for speaking Indian, and the ubiquitous little school graveyards that signaled the terrible toll these institutions took on young lives. Required reading for all students of United States race relations". — The London Times Higher Education Supplement.<P>"A story worth reading and remembering, one that reveals the use of education as a weapon of war, a method of domination. A strong lesson in the potential for education to become part of a political and cultural arsenal". — American Journal of Education<P>"Persuasive and moving, this book is full of good stories that should appeal to the general public". — Brian Dippie, author of The Vanishing American: White Attitudes and U.S. Indian Policy.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Tables

Preface

Prologue: 1882

Part One: Civilization

1. Reform

2. Models

3. System

Part Two: Education

4. Institution

5. Classroom

6. Rituals

Part Three: Response

7. Resistance

8. Accommodation

Part Four: Causatum

9. Home

10. Policy

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780700608386
Subtitle:
American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928
Author:
Adams, David Wallace
Author:
Adams, David Wallace
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Subject:
General
Subject:
Social Policy
Subject:
Education
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Boarding schools
Subject:
Bilingual Education
Subject:
United States Social policy.
Subject:
United States Race relations.
Subject:
Education-Multicultural
Subject:
Native American
Publication Date:
19951030
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
9.02x6.16x.89 in. 1.19 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Education » Multicultural
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » General

Education for Extinction : American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928 (95 Edition) New Trade Paper
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Product details 408 pages University Press of Kansas - English 9780700608386 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This is, quite simply, a wonderful book. In lively prose, Adams tells the poignant story of the relentless war against American Indian children. It is a tale about policy makers who sought to use boarding schools as an instrument for transforming Indian youth to 'American' ways of thinking, doing, and living. Adams demonstrates convincingly that Native American students were anything but passive recipients of the 'curriculum of civilization.' Recommended for all levels". — Choice<P>"Everything is here: the cropped hair and army uniforms, the endless drilling and marching, the round of daily chores, the spells in the guardhouse for speaking Indian, and the ubiquitous little school graveyards that signaled the terrible toll these institutions took on young lives. Required reading for all students of United States race relations". — The London Times Higher Education Supplement.<P>"A story worth reading and remembering, one that reveals the use of education as a weapon of war, a method of domination. A strong lesson in the potential for education to become part of a political and cultural arsenal". — American Journal of Education<P>"Persuasive and moving, this book is full of good stories that should appeal to the general public". — Brian Dippie, author of The Vanishing American: White Attitudes and U.S. Indian Policy.
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