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Living in the Shadow of Death (94 Edition)

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Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

For more than 150 years, until well into the twentieth century, tuberculosis was the dreaded scourge that AIDS is for us today. Based on the diaries and letters of hundreds of individuals over five generations, Living in the Shadow of Death is the first book to present an intimate and evocative portrait of what it was like for patients as well as families and communities to struggle against this dreaded disease. "Consumption", as it used to be called, is one of the oldest known diseases. But it wasn't until the beginning of the nineteenth century that it became pervasive and feared in the United States, the cause of one out of every five deaths. Consumption crossed all boundaries of geography and social class. How did people afflicted with the disease deal with their fate? How did their families? What did it mean for the community when consumption affected almost every family and every town? Sheila M. Rothman documents a fascinating story. Each generation had its own special view of the origins, transmission, and therapy for the disease, definitions that reflected not only medical knowledge but views on gender obligations, religious beliefs, and community responsibilities. In general, Rothman points out, tenacity and resolve, not passivity or resignation, marked people's response to illness and to their physicians. Convinced that the outdoor life was better for their health, young men with tuberculosis in the nineteenth century interrupted their college studies and careers to go to sea or to settle in the West, in the process shaping communities in Colorado, Arizona, and California. Women, anticipating the worst, raised their children to be welcomed as orphans in other people's homes.In the twentieth century, both men and women entered sanatoriums, sacrificing autonomy for the prospect of a cure. Poignant as biography, illuminating as social history, this book reminds us that ours is not the first generation to cope with the death of the young or with th

Synopsis:

For more than 150 years, until well into the 20th century, tuberculosis was the dreaded scourge that AIDS is for us today. Based on the diaries and letters of hundreds of individuals over five generations, "Living in the Shadow of Death" presents an intimate and evocative portrait of what it was like for patients as well as families and communities to struggle against this dreaded disease.

Synopsis:

Tuberculosis — once the cause of as many as one in five deaths in the U.S. — crossed all boundaries of class and gender, but the methods of treatment for men and women differed radically. While men were encouraged to go out to sea or to the open country, women were expected to stay at home, surrounded by family, to anticipate a lingering death. Several women, however, chose rather to head for the drier climates of the West and build new lives on their own. But with the discovery of the tubercle bacillus in 1882 and the establishment of sanatoriums, both men and women were relegated to lives of seclusion, sacrificing autonomy for the prospect of a cure.

In Living in the Shadow of Death Sheila Rothman presents the story of tuberculosis from the perspective of those who suffered, and in doing so helps us to understand the human side of the disease — and to cope with its resurgence. The letters, diaries, and journals piece together what it was like to experience tuberculosis, and eloquently reveal the tenacity and resolve with which people faced it.

A fascinating and powerful book... compelling reading. Tuberculosis was a disease, now reemerging, that killed more Americans, young or old, rich or poor, than any other disease, until well into the twentieth century. It shaped our culture, determined careers, blighted lives. Rothman writes beautifully and with great sensitivity about the human condition. The book will, I believe, become a classic in the field. — David E. Rodgers, Cornell Medical College

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [259]-304) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780801851865
Author:
Rothman, Sheila M.
Author:
Rothman
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Location:
Baltimore :
Subject:
Medicine
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Tuberculosis
Subject:
Tuberculosis -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-History of Medicine
Series Volume:
nr. 2
Publication Date:
19951131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
332
Dimensions:
9.20x6.12x1.00 in. 1.10 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Business » Banking
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Illnesses
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Living in the Shadow of Death (94 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 332 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9780801851865 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , For more than 150 years, until well into the 20th century, tuberculosis was the dreaded scourge that AIDS is for us today. Based on the diaries and letters of hundreds of individuals over five generations, "Living in the Shadow of Death" presents an intimate and evocative portrait of what it was like for patients as well as families and communities to struggle against this dreaded disease.
"Synopsis" by , Tuberculosis — once the cause of as many as one in five deaths in the U.S. — crossed all boundaries of class and gender, but the methods of treatment for men and women differed radically. While men were encouraged to go out to sea or to the open country, women were expected to stay at home, surrounded by family, to anticipate a lingering death. Several women, however, chose rather to head for the drier climates of the West and build new lives on their own. But with the discovery of the tubercle bacillus in 1882 and the establishment of sanatoriums, both men and women were relegated to lives of seclusion, sacrificing autonomy for the prospect of a cure.

In Living in the Shadow of Death Sheila Rothman presents the story of tuberculosis from the perspective of those who suffered, and in doing so helps us to understand the human side of the disease — and to cope with its resurgence. The letters, diaries, and journals piece together what it was like to experience tuberculosis, and eloquently reveal the tenacity and resolve with which people faced it.

A fascinating and powerful book... compelling reading. Tuberculosis was a disease, now reemerging, that killed more Americans, young or old, rich or poor, than any other disease, until well into the twentieth century. It shaped our culture, determined careers, blighted lives. Rothman writes beautifully and with great sensitivity about the human condition. The book will, I believe, become a classic in the field. — David E. Rodgers, Cornell Medical College

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