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This title in other editions

Alcoholism in America: From Reconstruction to Prohibition

by

Alcoholism in America: From Reconstruction to Prohibition Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Edgar Allan Poe vividly recalls standing in a prison cell, fearing for his life, as he watched men mutilate and dismember the body of his mother. That memory, however graphic and horrifying, was not real. It was a hallucination, one of many suffered by the writer, caused by his addiction to alcohol.

Inand#160;Rum Maniacs, Matthew Warner Osborn reveals how and why pathological drinking became a subject of medical interest, social controversy, and lurid fascination in the early American republic. At the heart of that story is the disease that Poe suffered: delirium tremens. First described in 1813, delirium tremens and its characteristic hallucinations inspired sweeping changes in how the medical profession saw and treated the problems of alcohol abuse. Based on new theories of pathological anatomy, human physiology, and mental illness, the new diagnosis founded the medical conviction and popular belief that habitual drinking could become a psychological and physiological disease. By midcentury, delirium tremens had inspired a wide range of popular theater, poetry, fiction, and illustration. This romantic fascination endured into the twentieth century, most notably in the classic Disney cartoonand#160;Dumbo, in which a pink pachyderm marching band haunts a drunken young elephant.and#160;Rum Maniacsand#160;reveals just how delirium tremens shaped the modern experience of alcohol addiction as a psychic struggle with inner demons.

Book News Annotation:

This is a paperbound reprint of a 2005 book. In her account of social responses to heavy drinking in the US from the 1870s to the 1910s, Tracy (history of science and medicine, U. of Oklahoma) focuses on how diseases reflect social values, economic patterns, economic imperatives, and political and professional priorities; and what consequences new diagnostic categories have on social institutions, public opinions, and the lives of ordinary individuals. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Despite the lack of medical consensus regarding alcoholism as a disease, many people readily accept the concept of addiction as a clinical as well as a social disorder. An alcoholic is a victim of social circumstance and genetic destiny. Although one might imagine that this dual approach is a reflection of today's enlightened and sympathetic society, historian Sarah Tracy discovers that efforts to medicalize alcoholism are anything but new.

Alcoholism in America tells the story of physicians, politicians, court officials, and families struggling to address the danger of excessive alcohol consumption at the turn of the century. Beginning with the formation of the American Association for the Cure of Inebriates in 1870 and concluding with the enactment of Prohibition in 1920, this study examines the effect of the disease concept on individual drinkers and their families and friends, as well as the ongoing battle between policymakers and the professional medical community for jurisdiction over alcohol problems. Tracy captures the complexity of the political, professional, and social negotiations that have characterized the alcoholism field both yesterday and today.

Tracy weaves American medical history, social history, and the sociology of knowledge into a narrative that probes the connections among reform movements, social welfare policy, the specialization of medicine, and the social construction of disease. Her insights will engage all those interested in America's historic and current battles with addiction.

Synopsis:

In Rum Maniacs, Matthew Osborn traces how and why pathological drinking became a subject of medical interest, social controversy, and lurid fascination in the early American republic. At the heart of that story is the history of delirium tremens and the and#147;fantastic terrorsand#8221; that characterize the disease. It was a relatively new disease, however, having been first described by British physicians in 1813. Why, Osborn asks, did a well-known condition that had long held no interest to physicians suddenly become a cutting-edge medical diagnosis? The diagnosis was made possible in part by broad developments within the medical profession and#150; including the transatlantic circulation of medical texts and journals, the rapid expansion of medical education, and the growing practice of pathological anatomy and#150; but also by historical developments outside the medical sphere and#150; including contemporary trends in literary and popular culture that physicians drew upon in their narrative case histories of the disease. Delirium tremens, Osborn shows, was inseparable from the intellectual, social, economic, and cultural developments that occurred in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This blossoming interest marked the beginning of the dramatic intervention of the American medical profession into the social response to alcohol abuse (or and#147;intemperance,and#8221; as it was then termed).

Synopsis:

Alcoholism in America tells the story of physicians, politicians, court officials, and families struggling to address the problem of excessive alcohol consumption at the turn of the century. Beginning with the formation of the American Association for the Cure of Inebriates in 1870 and concluding with the enactment of Prohibition in 1920, historian Sarah Tracy examines the effect of the disease concept of alcoholism on individual drinkers and their families and friends, as well as the ongoing battle between policy makers and the professional medical community for jurisdiction over alcohol problems.

About the Author

Matthew Warner Osborn is assistant professor of history at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1 Ardent Spirits and Republican Medicine

2 Discovering Delirium Tremens

3 Hard Drinking and Want

4 The Benevolent Empire of Medicine

5 The Pathology of Intemperance

6 The Drunkardand#8217;s Demons

Epilogue: Alcoholics and Pink Elephants

NotesIndex

Product Details

ISBN:
9780801886201
Author:
Tracy, Sarah W.
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Author:
Osborn, Matthew Warner
Subject:
Planning
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Landscape
Subject:
Architecture-Landscape Architecture
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20070431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
18 halftones, 1 table
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.9 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Landscape Architecture
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Urban Planning
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Drug and Alcohol Addiction
History and Social Science » American Studies » Drugs and Culture
History and Social Science » US History » General
Transportation » Automotive » General

Alcoholism in America: From Reconstruction to Prohibition New Trade Paper
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Product details 280 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9780801886201 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Despite the lack of medical consensus regarding alcoholism as a disease, many people readily accept the concept of addiction as a clinical as well as a social disorder. An alcoholic is a victim of social circumstance and genetic destiny. Although one might imagine that this dual approach is a reflection of today's enlightened and sympathetic society, historian Sarah Tracy discovers that efforts to medicalize alcoholism are anything but new.

Alcoholism in America tells the story of physicians, politicians, court officials, and families struggling to address the danger of excessive alcohol consumption at the turn of the century. Beginning with the formation of the American Association for the Cure of Inebriates in 1870 and concluding with the enactment of Prohibition in 1920, this study examines the effect of the disease concept on individual drinkers and their families and friends, as well as the ongoing battle between policymakers and the professional medical community for jurisdiction over alcohol problems. Tracy captures the complexity of the political, professional, and social negotiations that have characterized the alcoholism field both yesterday and today.

Tracy weaves American medical history, social history, and the sociology of knowledge into a narrative that probes the connections among reform movements, social welfare policy, the specialization of medicine, and the social construction of disease. Her insights will engage all those interested in America's historic and current battles with addiction.

"Synopsis" by ,
In Rum Maniacs, Matthew Osborn traces how and why pathological drinking became a subject of medical interest, social controversy, and lurid fascination in the early American republic. At the heart of that story is the history of delirium tremens and the and#147;fantastic terrorsand#8221; that characterize the disease. It was a relatively new disease, however, having been first described by British physicians in 1813. Why, Osborn asks, did a well-known condition that had long held no interest to physicians suddenly become a cutting-edge medical diagnosis? The diagnosis was made possible in part by broad developments within the medical profession and#150; including the transatlantic circulation of medical texts and journals, the rapid expansion of medical education, and the growing practice of pathological anatomy and#150; but also by historical developments outside the medical sphere and#150; including contemporary trends in literary and popular culture that physicians drew upon in their narrative case histories of the disease. Delirium tremens, Osborn shows, was inseparable from the intellectual, social, economic, and cultural developments that occurred in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This blossoming interest marked the beginning of the dramatic intervention of the American medical profession into the social response to alcohol abuse (or and#147;intemperance,and#8221; as it was then termed).
"Synopsis" by , Alcoholism in America tells the story of physicians, politicians, court officials, and families struggling to address the problem of excessive alcohol consumption at the turn of the century. Beginning with the formation of the American Association for the Cure of Inebriates in 1870 and concluding with the enactment of Prohibition in 1920, historian Sarah Tracy examines the effect of the disease concept of alcoholism on individual drinkers and their families and friends, as well as the ongoing battle between policy makers and the professional medical community for jurisdiction over alcohol problems.
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