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I, Nadia, Wife of a Terrorist (France Overseas: Studies in Empire and Decolonization)

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I, Nadia, Wife of a Terrorist (France Overseas: Studies in Empire and Decolonization) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Read an excerpt

"[A] fascinating autobiography. . . Nadia's is a rare, firsthand account by a female Islamist extremist, and it reveals the personal, domestic dramas underlying the political turmoil of our times."—The Washington Post Book World

“This first-person account of a young woman’s seduction by Islamist extremism also offers an intimate look at the Algerian civil war. . . . Gacemi’s book received a lot of attention in France. Since Americans are less knowledgeable about Algeria, it will probably get less here-which is unfortunate, since her account of how a whole community can be seduced by terrorists is frightening and invaluable.”—Publishers Weekly

"Gacemi's unique and invaluable portrayal of this personal side of terrorism is shocking, poignant, and impossible to forget."—Booklist

"Nadia tells her story simply, offering little analysis. It is the very directness of the narrative that will push readers to consider both the appeal Islamism holds for some downtrodden women, and the way militant Islamism keeps women prisoners. An ultimately heart-wrenching personal account."—Kirkus Reviews

"Readers should ponder the wisdom of the decision made by Algeria’s military to deprive Islamists of their political victory in 1991. It is because Islamist radicals enter the political process with such contempt for democracy that one must be cautious in legitimizing them politically. For those interested in learning how jihadists and militants are perverting Islam, Gacemi’s book is a good place to start."—LCDR Youssef Aboul-Enein,Military Review

The Algerian journalist Baya Gacemi takes a dangerous political step in writing the “autobiography” of a young Algerian woman whom she met through a program for female victims of Islamist violence in Algiers. Nadia, from a small town in central Algeria that has been especially affected by the struggle between Islamist terrorists and the authorities, married a local hooligan whose rebellious spirit she found irresistible. Unfortunately, her husband was already transforming himself from petty criminal to foot soldier and then local emir of the Islamic Action Group. Nadia's ensuing nightmare lasted over four years. As a result of the growing polarization between Islamists and the local government Nadia had become an outcast reviled by relatives and threatened by neighbors.

By 1996, with Nadia pregnant and destitute and her husband hunted by government agents, her parents expelled her from their home. Gacemi provides a human face to the cultural wars that have torn Algeria and the Middle East apart, revealing the roots of terrorism and the impact of the nightmarish struggle of the women caught up in it.

Baya Gacemi is an Algerian journalist. Paul Côté and Constantina Mitchell are freelance translators in Montreal. They have cotranslated Letter from Morocco, Cry of the Gull, and Deaf Planet. Fanny Colonna is the director of research emerita at the French National Center of Scientific Research. Edmund Burke III is a professor of Middle Eastern and world history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the editor (with David N. Yaghoubian) of Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, second edition.

For more information on the translators, visit: http://www.cote-mitchell.com/

Review:

"This first-person account of a young woman's seduction by Islamist extremism also offers an intimate look at the Algerian civil war. Journalist Gacemi interviewed 'Nadia' (a pseudonym) in 1997 in Algiers, where she came seeking help at an organization for needy women. As a teenager in a poor village, Nadia fell in love with Ahmed, a charismatic hoodlum. Her persistence in sneaking out to meet him made her parents send her away to live with her uncles. Two years later, when her father finally accepted Ahmed's marriage offer, Nadia returned home expecting her dreams to be realized. Since she'd last seen him, however, Ahmed had joined the Armed Islamist Group, or GIA — a terrorist group then at the height of its power in the town. Nadia's dream became a nightmare, as she found herself cook and slave to her husband's 'brothers.' Yet the status of being the wife of a terrorist leader was addictive, and she accepted enough of what Ahmed told her about the GIA's political vision that she even believed the beatings she received from him were legitimate. Gacemi's book received a lot of attention in France. Since Americans are less knowledgeable about Algeria, it will probably get less here — which is unfortunate, since her account of how a whole community can be seduced by terrorists is frightening and invaluable. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Compelling ?as told to? autobiography of a young Algerian woman married to the leader of an Islamic terrorist organization.

Synopsis:

The Algerian journalist Baya Gacemi takes a dangerous political step in writing the “autobiography” of a young Algerian woman whom she met through a program for female victims of Islamist violence in Algiers. Nadia, from a small town in central Algeria that has been especially affected by the struggle between Islamist terrorists and the authorities, married a local hooligan whose rebellious spirit she found irresistible. Unfortunately, her husband was already transforming himself from petty criminal to foot soldier and then local emir of the Islamic Action Group. Nadia's ensuing nightmare lasted over four years. As a result of the growing polarization between Islamists and the local government Nadia had become an outcast reviled by relatives and threatened by neighbors.

By 1996, with Nadia pregnant and destitute and her husband hunted by government agents, her parents expelled her from their home. Gacemi provides a human face to the cultural wars that have torn Algeria and the Middle East apart, revealing the roots of terrorism and the impact of the nightmarish struggle of the women caught up in it.

#LINK<># 

About the Author

Baya Gacemi is an Algerian journalist.
 
Paul C&ocirc;t&eacute; and Constantina Mitchell are freelance translators in Montreal. They have cotranslated Letter from Morocco, Cry of the Gull, and Deaf Planet.
 
Fanny Colonna is the director of research emerita at the French National Center of Scientific Research.
 
Edmund Burke III is a professor of Middle Eastern and world history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the editor (with David N. Yaghoubian) of Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, second edition.
 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780803271241
Author:
Gacemi, Baya
Publisher:
Bison Books
Translator:
Cote, Paul
Translator:
Mitchell, Constantina
Translator:
Cote, Paul; Mitchell, Constantina
Author:
Burke III, Edmund
Author:
Edmund Burke III
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Middle East
Subject:
Terrorism
Subject:
Africa, north
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Terrorism
Subject:
Egypt
Subject:
Algeria Social conditions.
Subject:
Nadia
Subject:
Biography-Women
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
France Overseas: Studies in Empire and Decolonization
Publication Date:
20060631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
8.48x5.54x.43 in. .46 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Instruments » Guitar
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Islam » General

I, Nadia, Wife of a Terrorist (France Overseas: Studies in Empire and Decolonization) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$24.50 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Bison Books - English 9780803271241 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This first-person account of a young woman's seduction by Islamist extremism also offers an intimate look at the Algerian civil war. Journalist Gacemi interviewed 'Nadia' (a pseudonym) in 1997 in Algiers, where she came seeking help at an organization for needy women. As a teenager in a poor village, Nadia fell in love with Ahmed, a charismatic hoodlum. Her persistence in sneaking out to meet him made her parents send her away to live with her uncles. Two years later, when her father finally accepted Ahmed's marriage offer, Nadia returned home expecting her dreams to be realized. Since she'd last seen him, however, Ahmed had joined the Armed Islamist Group, or GIA — a terrorist group then at the height of its power in the town. Nadia's dream became a nightmare, as she found herself cook and slave to her husband's 'brothers.' Yet the status of being the wife of a terrorist leader was addictive, and she accepted enough of what Ahmed told her about the GIA's political vision that she even believed the beatings she received from him were legitimate. Gacemi's book received a lot of attention in France. Since Americans are less knowledgeable about Algeria, it will probably get less here — which is unfortunate, since her account of how a whole community can be seduced by terrorists is frightening and invaluable. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Compelling ?as told to? autobiography of a young Algerian woman married to the leader of an Islamic terrorist organization.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Algerian journalist Baya Gacemi takes a dangerous political step in writing the “autobiography” of a young Algerian woman whom she met through a program for female victims of Islamist violence in Algiers. Nadia, from a small town in central Algeria that has been especially affected by the struggle between Islamist terrorists and the authorities, married a local hooligan whose rebellious spirit she found irresistible. Unfortunately, her husband was already transforming himself from petty criminal to foot soldier and then local emir of the Islamic Action Group. Nadia's ensuing nightmare lasted over four years. As a result of the growing polarization between Islamists and the local government Nadia had become an outcast reviled by relatives and threatened by neighbors.

By 1996, with Nadia pregnant and destitute and her husband hunted by government agents, her parents expelled her from their home. Gacemi provides a human face to the cultural wars that have torn Algeria and the Middle East apart, revealing the roots of terrorism and the impact of the nightmarish struggle of the women caught up in it.

#LINK<># 

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