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James K. Polk (03 Edition)

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James K. Polk (03 Edition) Cover

ISBN13: 9780805069426
ISBN10: 0805069429
Condition: Student Owned
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The story of a pivotal president who watched over our westward expansion and solidified the dream of Jacksonian democracy

James K. Polk was a shrewd and decisive commander in chief, the youngest president elected to guide the still-young nation, who served as Speaker of the House and governor of Tennessee before taking office in 1845. Considered a natural successor to Andrew Jackson, “Young Hickory” miraculously revived his floundering political career by riding a wave of public sentiment in favor of annexing the Republic of Texas to the Union.

Shortly after his inauguration, he settled the disputed Oregon boundary and by 1846 had declared war on Mexico in hopes of annexing California. The considerably smaller American army never lost a battle. At home, however, Polk suffered a political firestorm of antiwar attacks from many fronts. Despite his tremendous accomplishments, he left office an extremely unpopular man, on whom stress had taken such a physical toll that he died within three months of departing Washington. Fellow Tennessean John Seigenthaler traces the life of this president who, as Truman noted, “said what he intended to do and did it.”

John Seigenthaler is the founder of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University. An administrative assistant to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, he was an award-winning journalist for the Nashville Tennessean for forty-three years, finally serving as the paper's editor, publisher, and CEO, and was named founding editorial director of USA Today in 1982. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., is the preeminent political historian of our time. The recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes and a National Humanities Medal, he published the first volume his autobiography, A Life in the Twentieth Century, in 2000.

In the summer of 1844, James K. Polk's political career was in ruins. As the Democratic National Convention approached, Polk had thought himself assured of the vice presidential nomination, but the presidential front-runner, former president Martin Van Buren, had made it clear that he had little interest in him. Van Buren was on a mission to regain the White House, which he had lost in 1840, and he needed a strong running mate. Polk had three strikes against him. First, Polk had been unable to deliver his and Andrew Jackson's home state of Tennessee in 1840, while Polk was governor. Second, he was fresh from having lost the governor's mansionfor a second time. And third, Van Burenas well as the Whigs' candidate, Henry Clayhad just taken a stand against the annexation of Texas, whereas Polk had come out in its favor.

But as the delegates assembled in Baltimore, Polk perceived a wave of public sentiment in favor of bringing Texas into the Union, and he rode that wave all the way to the nomination and eventually the White Housethe first "dark horse" candidate to do so. Congress soon annexed Texas, and Polk continued to look west, becoming the champion of what was known as "manifest destiny." He settled the disputed Oregon boundary with Great Britain, extending U.S. territory to the Pacific Ocean, and waged war on Mexico in hopes of winning California and New Mexico. The considerably smaller American army never lost a battle, and the southwest territories became part of the United States in 1848.

At home, however, Polk suffered a political firestorm of antiwar attacks, particularly from the Whigs. Despite tremendous accomplishments in just four yearsfrom pushing the westward expansion to restoring an independent Treasury to ushering in an era of free trade"Young Hickory" left office feeling the sting of criticism and suffering from a stressful presidency that had taken a heavy physical toll. He died within three months of departing Washington. Fellow Tennessean John Seigenthaler traces the life and legacy of this president who, as Harry S Truman noted, "said what he intended to do and did it."

"James Knox Polk surely is history's most underappreciated president. Few Americans have any awareness that in four years he engineered the annexation of Texas, bluffed the British out of Oregon, waged war with Mexico to take California and New Mexico, enlarged the country's land mass by a third and made the United States a continental nation. To read his presidential diary is to be retrospectively introduced to a chief magistrate who was tough-minded, strong-willed, egocentric, sometimes petty, usually predictable, often duplicitous, and always partisan. He served but one term by his own choice, pledging as a candidate that he would not seek reelection. He kept his word. A complete workaholic, he left office worn and ill and went home to Nashville to recover his health. It hardly seems fair that three months after leaving the White House he was dead."John Seigenthaler on James K. Polk

"John Seigenthaler's succinct biography of the 11th presidentamong the latest volumes in Times Books' American Presidents seriesis well worth reading in this election year . . . Seigenthaler does a fine job wending his way through the morass of intrigue that was Polk's political career."Frank Wilson, The Philadelphia Inquirer

"This newest addition to the American Presidents series, edited by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., offers a solid portrait of an unlikable man who achieved extraordinary things. A Tennesseean like Polk, Seigenthaler (founding editorial director of USA Today) agrees with those who rate this dour, partisan, grudge-holding, one-term president a success."Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

Siegenthaler pens the story of the pivotal president who watched over America's westward expansion and solidified the dream of Jacksonian democracy.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-177) and index.

About the Author

John Seigenthaler is the founder of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University. An administrative assistant to Robert F. Kennedy, he was an award-winning journalist for The Nashvile Tennessean for forty-three years, finally serving as the papers editor, publisher, and CEO, and was named founding editorial director of USA Today in 1982. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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OneMansView, March 7, 2011 (view all comments by OneMansView)
He did great things.

This book is a nice, concise, easily-read, and informative look at a rather obscure president, who, despite an odd, prickly personality, accomplished quite a lot in his one term, yet somewhat unwittingly set into motion forces that led to the Civil War. However, only the last third of the book covers his presidency. The author does manage to capture the substance of the man in this small book.

Given the brevity of the book (156 pages), the author presents a substantial amount of detail concerning Polk's pre-presidential life. Before his becoming president at age forty-nine in 1845, the youngest age for a president at that point, the reader learns, among many topics, that Polk was born in NC in 1895, the first-born child of an adventurous, politically-inclined, land-owning family with Presbyterian leanings who became successful Tennessee pioneers; was sickly as a youth and endured a painful operation that somewhat restored his health; had an affinity for learning, attended several schools, and became a successful lawyer; entered Tennessee politics in his late twenties serving first as a legislator and then at age thirty began a run of seven terms in the US House, the last two as Speaker; married the vivacious Sarah Childress - his polar opposite in personality - though the marriage was childless; had a near lifelong admiration and association with Andrew Jackson, backing his policies in the House and receiving his help as he sought national office; and benefitted from the controversial Texas annexation issue in 1844 propelling him from political obscurity into the White House.

We would know far less about Polk's presidency and him personally had he not kept a very detailed journal of those years. The author draws from that journal to show just how embattled Polk was, especially in his feelings on the matters, in dealing with the tariff question, a new independent treasury, and far more importantly, the partitioning of Oregon and the entire Texas and then Mexican War crisis. Of course the War towers over all the rest. Polk was beleaguered from having to continually deal with the opposition, both Whigs and recalcitrant Democrats, his own cabinet, namely James Buchanan - his devious Sec of State, and his many disappointments with his generals and diplomats. As the author points out, his frustration with the War effort was due to the impossibility of using his familiar micromanagement style. Most interestingly, his journal shows a fairly large gap between his somewhat subdued, polite public persona and his more agitated private thoughts.

The author does not completely ignore the biggest issue lying just below the surface of the entire annexation, expansion development - that is, slavery. He indicates that Polk was a slave owner and actively bought and sold slaves even as president. Polk invited Rep David Wilmot of PA to the White House to discuss his controversial amendment to an appropriation bill that would ban slavery from any new territory acquired from Mexico. Polk's answer to the situation was to keep it all from rising to the surface. However, it is from that point that the slavery issue slowly escalated over the next fifteen years to the bursting point. But Polk died only a few months after leaving office, never having to take notice of the fatal consequence set in motion by the Mexican War. The author briefly discusses the question of presidential greatness in regard to Polk. The answer is evasive: "He did great things." Does that really make him great, or even near great?
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780805069426
Editor:
Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr.
Publisher:
Times Books
Editor:
Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr.
Author:
Schlesinger, Arthur M.
Author:
Seigenthaler, John
Author:
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
Presidents & Heads of State
Subject:
Presidents -- United States.
Subject:
Polk, James K
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Biography-Presidents and Heads of State
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
First Times
Series:
American Presidents Series
Series Volume:
FO 222
Publication Date:
20040131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
7.77 x 5.72 x 0.875 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » Historical
Biography » Presidents and Heads of State
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War
History and Social Science » US History » US Presidency

James K. Polk (03 Edition) Used Hardcover
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Product details 208 pages Times Books - English 9780805069426 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Siegenthaler pens the story of the pivotal president who watched over America's westward expansion and solidified the dream of Jacksonian democracy.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-177) and index.
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