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Other titles in the American Empire Project series:

The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic (American Empire Project)

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The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic (American Empire Project) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home.

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." In this important national bestseller, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling us to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarism — from George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex — Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon — with the Pentagon in the lead.

Review:

"A provocative summons to the task of reining in a runaway military." Booklist

Review:

"Impressive...a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy." Los Angeles Times Book Review

Review:

"Johnson's superbly researched book is also an angry book. But who can blame him?" San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"A Ciceronian indictment of our nation's transformation from lone superpower to imperial bully....[D]eeply unsettling..." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"In Chalmers Johnson the American empire has found its Jeremiah. He deserves to be heard; but the proper response to his gloomy message is not despair, but thought followed by action." Andrew J. Bacevich, The Washington Post

Review:

"Johnson assumes his readers know sufficient history or have traveled widely enough to follow his warning....Precisely because he's probably right, Johnson's Sorrows is as maddening as it is important." San Diego Union-Tribune

Review:

"[P]rovocative....Fans of Blowback will be pleased despite Johnson's lack of remedies..." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Johnson is an engaging and provocative writer....Despite its ideological excesses, Sorrows of Empire is a book worth reading. Its warnings are serious, and its arguments should certainly be considered in the ongoing debate over American foreign policy." Houston Chronicle

Review:

"Mr. Johnson has unfortunately gone over to the dark side of conspiratorial explanations of American foreign policy....For anyone who has served in the government and seen how our foreign policy is made, they don't pass the reality test." Ronald D. Asmus, The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

"Impressive . . . a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."

-Los Angeles Times Book Review, front page

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." In this important national bestseller, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling us to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon in the lead.

Synopsis:

"Impressive . . . a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."

-Los Angeles Times Book Review, front page

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." In this important national bestseller, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling us to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon in the lead.

Chalmers Johnson, president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, is a frequent contributor to the London Review of Books and The Nation. His previous books include the national bestseller Blowback, as well as MITI and the Japanese Miracle. Johnson lives near San Diego.
In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its citizens to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers the deep war-mongering roots of our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He also offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's more provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization, and bankrupting the United States even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon in the lead.

From the author of Blowback comes this bestselling and timely critique of American-style militarism.

"[An] enormously useful study."Ronald Steel, The Nation

"Impressive . . . A powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned againstmade more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling."Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review

"Johnson devotes most of his book to examining the numerous foreign bases (which have proliferated since the end of the Cold War), the often legitimate reasons for their initial establishment, the outrages that American servicemen from them perpetrate on their hosts, as well as the comforts and benefits of empire and militarism that prevent their abandonment. Johnson believes that the initial post-Cold War base expansion was aimed at supporting America's century-old economic imperialism, now called 'globalization.' But with the election of the 'boy emperor' and the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, 'the United States shifted decisively from economic to military imperialism,' which undermined international law and organizations, weakened democracy at home, replaced truth with propaganda, and courted financial ruin. Johnson's superbly researched book is also an angry [one]. But who can blame him?"Walter C. Uhler, San Francisco Chronicle

"A scathing and scary indictment of America's military expansion to all corners of the globe."John Wilkens, The San Diego Union-Tribune

"[An] enormously useful study."Ronald Steel, The Nation

s26"Every page of The Sorrows of Empire burns with fierce indignation at the sacrifice of American rights, values, and economic well-being in the name of conquest and empire. Johnson has produced a blistering critique of the Bush Administration's militaristic foreign policy and its dangerous infatuation with high-tech weaponry. Everyone who cares about the survival of American democracy should read Johnson's stunning indictment."Michael T. Klare, author of Resource Wars

"Johnson's relentless logic, authoritative scholarship, and elegantly biting prose distinguish The Sorrows of Empire, like all his other work. Anyone who reads it will have a much sharper sense of the costs of America's new world-girdling commitmentsand I hope it is widely read."James Fallows, author of Breaking the News

"Johnson has given us a polemic, but one soundly grounded in an impressive array of facts and data. The costs of empire are our sorrow, he contends. He anticipates a state of perpetual war, involving more military expenditures and overseas expansion, and presidents who will continue to eclipse or ignore Congress. He documents a growing system of propaganda, disinformation, and glorification of war and military power. Finally, he fears economic bankruptcy as the president underwrites these adventures with a congressional blank check while neglecting growing problems of education, health care, and a decaying physical infrastructure. The Sorrows of Empire offers a powerful indictment of current U.S. military and foreign policy. It also provides an occasion to consider the constitutional values of our republic."Stanley I. Kutler, The Los Angeles Times

"Johnson is a legendary scholar who gave Americans the first deeply authentic understanding of modern Japan's unique economic system. In this cri de couer, he asks us to understand ourselvesto grasp, before it is too late, that America's modern militarist empire threatens to destroy the democratic republic. His hanalysis is powerful and dreadfully persuasive."William Greider, author of The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy

"For American patriots, there is no more important book to read to

About the Author

Chalmers Johnson, president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, is a frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times and The Nation. His previous books include the national bestseller Blowback, as well as MITI and the Japanese Miracle. He lives near San Diego.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805077971
Author:
Johnson, Chalmers
Publisher:
Owl Books (NY)
Author:
Johnson, Chalmers A.
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Intervention (International law)
Subject:
United States Politics and government.
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Subject:
United States - 21st Century
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Series:
American Empire Project
Publication Date:
January 6, 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 maps and 1 chart
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.33 x 6.38 x 1.09 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » Covert Government and Conspiracy Theory
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic (American Empire Project) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.00 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Owl Books (NY) - English 9780805077971 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A provocative summons to the task of reining in a runaway military."
"Review" by , "Impressive...a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."
"Review" by , "Johnson's superbly researched book is also an angry book. But who can blame him?"
"Review" by , "A Ciceronian indictment of our nation's transformation from lone superpower to imperial bully....[D]eeply unsettling..."
"Review" by , "In Chalmers Johnson the American empire has found its Jeremiah. He deserves to be heard; but the proper response to his gloomy message is not despair, but thought followed by action."
"Review" by , "Johnson assumes his readers know sufficient history or have traveled widely enough to follow his warning....Precisely because he's probably right, Johnson's Sorrows is as maddening as it is important."
"Review" by , "[P]rovocative....Fans of Blowback will be pleased despite Johnson's lack of remedies..."
"Review" by , "Johnson is an engaging and provocative writer....Despite its ideological excesses, Sorrows of Empire is a book worth reading. Its warnings are serious, and its arguments should certainly be considered in the ongoing debate over American foreign policy."
"Review" by , "Mr. Johnson has unfortunately gone over to the dark side of conspiratorial explanations of American foreign policy....For anyone who has served in the government and seen how our foreign policy is made, they don't pass the reality test."
"Synopsis" by ,
"Impressive . . . a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."

-Los Angeles Times Book Review, front page

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." In this important national bestseller, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling us to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon in the lead.

"Synopsis" by ,
"Impressive . . . a powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."

-Los Angeles Times Book Review, front page

In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." In this important national bestseller, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling us to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarism-from George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complex-Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon-with the Pentagon in the lead.

Chalmers Johnson, president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, is a frequent contributor to the London Review of Books and The Nation. His previous books include the national bestseller Blowback, as well as MITI and the Japanese Miracle. Johnson lives near San Diego.
In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe's "lone superpower," then as a "reluctant sheriff," next as the "indispensable nation," and, in the wake of 9/11, as a "New Rome." Here, Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its citizens to pick up the burden of empire.

Recalling the classic warnings against militarismfrom George Washington's Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower's denunciation of the military-industrial complexJohnson uncovers the deep war-mongering roots of our past. Turning to the present, he maps America's expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He also offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as "secret" everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest.

Among Johnson's more provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization, and bankrupting the United States even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubiconwith the Pentagon in the lead.

From the author of Blowback comes this bestselling and timely critique of American-style militarism.

"[An] enormously useful study."Ronald Steel, The Nation

"Impressive . . . A powerful indictment of U.S. military and foreign policy."Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned againstmade more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling."Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review

"Johnson devotes most of his book to examining the numerous foreign bases (which have proliferated since the end of the Cold War), the often legitimate reasons for their initial establishment, the outrages that American servicemen from them perpetrate on their hosts, as well as the comforts and benefits of empire and militarism that prevent their abandonment. Johnson believes that the initial post-Cold War base expansion was aimed at supporting America's century-old economic imperialism, now called 'globalization.' But with the election of the 'boy emperor' and the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, 'the United States shifted decisively from economic to military imperialism,' which undermined international law and organizations, weakened democracy at home, replaced truth with propaganda, and courted financial ruin. Johnson's superbly researched book is also an angry [one]. But who can blame him?"Walter C. Uhler, San Francisco Chronicle

"A scathing and scary indictment of America's military expansion to all corners of the globe."John Wilkens, The San Diego Union-Tribune

"[An] enormously useful study."Ronald Steel, The Nation

s26"Every page of The Sorrows of Empire burns with fierce indignation at the sacrifice of American rights, values, and economic well-being in the name of conquest and empire. Johnson has produced a blistering critique of the Bush Administration's militaristic foreign policy and its dangerous infatuation with high-tech weaponry. Everyone who cares about the survival of American democracy should read Johnson's stunning indictment."Michael T. Klare, author of Resource Wars

"Johnson's relentless logic, authoritative scholarship, and elegantly biting prose distinguish The Sorrows of Empire, like all his other work. Anyone who reads it will have a much sharper sense of the costs of America's new world-girdling commitmentsand I hope it is widely read."James Fallows, author of Breaking the News

"Johnson has given us a polemic, but one soundly grounded in an impressive array of facts and data. The costs of empire are our sorrow, he contends. He anticipates a state of perpetual war, involving more military expenditures and overseas expansion, and presidents who will continue to eclipse or ignore Congress. He documents a growing system of propaganda, disinformation, and glorification of war and military power. Finally, he fears economic bankruptcy as the president underwrites these adventures with a congressional blank check while neglecting growing problems of education, health care, and a decaying physical infrastructure. The Sorrows of Empire offers a powerful indictment of current U.S. military and foreign policy. It also provides an occasion to consider the constitutional values of our republic."Stanley I. Kutler, The Los Angeles Times

"Johnson is a legendary scholar who gave Americans the first deeply authentic understanding of modern Japan's unique economic system. In this cri de couer, he asks us to understand ourselvesto grasp, before it is too late, that America's modern militarist empire threatens to destroy the democratic republic. His hanalysis is powerful and dreadfully persuasive."William Greider, author of The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy

"For American patriots, there is no more important book to read to

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