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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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Autumn Glory : Baseball's First World Series (03 Edition)

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Autumn Glory : Baseball's First World Series (03 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

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Publisher Comments:

A suspenseful account of the glorious days a century ago when our national madness began

A post-season series of games to establish supremacy in the major leagues was not inevitable in the baseball world. But in 1903 the owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates (in the well-established National League) challenged the Boston Americans (in the upstart American League) to a play-off, which he was sure his team would win. They didn't--and that wasn't the only surprise during what became the first World Series. In Autumn Glory, Louis P. Masur tells the riveting story of two agonizing weeks in which the stars blew it, unknown players stole the show, hysterical fans got into the act, and umpires had to hold on for dear life.

Before and even during the 1903 season, it had seemed that baseball might succumb to the forces that had been splintering the sport for decades: owners' greed, players' rowdyism, fans' unrest. Yet baseball prevailed, and Masur tells the equally dramatic story of how it did so, in a country preoccupied with labor strife and big-business ruthlessness, and anxious about the welfare of those crowding into cities such as Pittsburgh and Boston (which in themselves offered competing versions of the American dream). His colorful history of how the first World Series consolidated baseball's hold on the American imagination makes us see what one sportswriter meant when he wrote at the time, Baseball is the melting pot at a boil, the most democratic sport in the world. All in all, Masur believes, it still is.

Louis Masur, a professor of history at City College of New York and the editor of Reviews in American History, is also the author of 1831: Year of Eclipse. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and children.

A postseason series of games to establish supremacy in the major leagues was not inevitable in the baseball world. But in 1903 the owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates (in the well-established National League) challenged the Boston Americans (in the upstart American League) to a play-off, which he was sure his team would win. They didn'tand that wasn't the only surprise during what became the first World Series. In Autumn Glory, noted American historian Masur tells the full, riveting story of two agonizing weeks in which the stars blew it, unknown players stole the show, hysterical fans got into the act, and umpires had to hold on for dear life.

Before and even during the 1903 season, it seemed that baseball might succumb to the forces that had been splintering the sport for decades: owners' greed, players' rowdyism, fans' unrest. Yet baseball prevailed, and Masur here explains and explores how it did so. His book thus profiles an early-twentieth-century America preoccupied with labor strife and big-business ruthlessness, and anxious about the welfare of those who kept crowding into cities such as Pittsburgh and Boston (which in themselves offered competing versions of the American dream). This colorful history of how the first World Series consolidated baseball's hold on the American imagination makes us see what one sportswriter meant when he wrote, way back then, that "baseball is the melting pot at a boil, the most democratic sport in the world."

"Autumn Glory is a book to be savored in all seasons. Louis Masur vividly recreates a bygone year not only of immortals such as Cy Young, but also of forgotten diamond heroes with monikers such as Ginger Beaumont, Kitty Bransfield, and Noodles Hahn; a time when players rode to the stadium through cheering throngs in open barouches, and when, inning after inning, derby-hatted, cigar-smoking fans waved red parasols and belted out music-hall ballads until their throats were raw."William E. Leuchtenburg, William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina

"Autumn Glory is a book to be savored in all seasons. Louis Masur vividly recreates a bygone year not only of immortals such as Cy Young, but also of forgotten diamond heroes with monikers such as Ginger Beaumont, Kitty Bransfield, and Noodles Hahn; a time when players rode to the stadium through cheering throngs in open barouches, and when, inning after inning, derby-hatted, cigar-smoking fans waved red parasols and belted out music-hall ballads until their throats were raw."William E. Leuchtenburg, William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina

"As the World Series turns a hundred years old . . . I can think of no better way to celebrate than reading Autumn Glory. Masur drops us back a full century to relive the first World Series, and in his hands the games lose none of their excitement and flavor. The era comes vibrantly alive in this wonderful baseball book."Jules Tygiel, author of Past Time: Baseball as History

"[This book offers] a well-crafted chronicle of the turbulent events leading up to the first championship series played between the pennant winners of the National and American Leagues. It also provides a balanced and detailed account of the Series. Masur's narrative strategy, similar to that used by Jane Leavy in her recent best-selling biography of Sandy Koufax, is to alternate chapters on historical background with those on the games played in the series . . . The strategy works perfectly because it reflects the leisurely pace of baseball. The gaps between pitches, innings, games, and seasons have always invited fans to talk about baseball history and are a good part of the reason the game evolved into our national pastime . . . Writing a perfect baseball book is as difficult as pitching a perfect game, but Louis P. Masur comes close in his well-written double narrative of 'baseball at its apogee.' Among the several books out this spring in recognition of the centennial of the first World Series, Autumn Glory, with its eloquent prose and balanced research, is clearly a winner."Richard Peterson, Chicago Tribune

"An excellent review of [the] first World Series played between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Boston Americans. Masur's fine book provides considerable detail not only on the ball games making up the Series but also on the cultural implications of the Series in the world of baseball as well as in American society . . . This book is recommended not only for anyone interested in the first World Series but also for those interested in a brief yet complete description of the tumultuous times when what we now call Major League Baseball was formed. Overall, Masur has written a thoroughly detailed and simply enjoyable account of these times and the historic first World Series."Richard J. Puerzer, University of Nebraska Press Journal

"In a perfect world, there would be a book this good about every World Series."Rob Neyer, author of Feeding the Green Monster

"No deep baseball devotee can justify skipping Louis P. Masur's Autumn Glory."David Hickley, New York Daily News

"Autumn Glory brings one back to those halcyon days when players and owners alike eschewed money for honor, and when Boston actually used to win the World Series. An invaluable resource for all fans of the game."Kevin Baker, author of Paradise Alley

"Masur's Autumn Glory is the best researched and most eloquent account of the first World Series yet written. He provides ample evidence why the first modern fall classic became a beloved American tradition."Glenn Stout, coauthor of Red Sox Century

"This is a book that every baseball fan will enjoy. History-minded Americans will love it, too. It's a

Synopsis:

A suspenseful account of the glorious days a century ago when our national madness began

A post-season series of games to establish supremacy in the major leagues was not inevitable in the baseball world. But in 1903 the owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates (in the well-established National League) challenged the Boston Americans (in the upstart American League) to a play-off, which he was sure his team would win. They didn't--and that wasn't the only surprise during what became the first World Series. In Autumn Glory, Louis P. Masur tells the riveting story of two agonizing weeks in which the stars blew it, unknown players stole the show, hysterical fans got into the act, and umpires had to hold on for dear life.

Before and even during the 1903 season, it had seemed that baseball might succumb to the forces that had been splintering the sport for decades: owners' greed, players' rowdyism, fans' unrest. Yet baseball prevailed, and Masur tells the equally dramatic story of how it did so, in a country preoccupied with labor strife and big-business ruthlessness, and anxious about the welfare of those crowding into cities such as Pittsburgh and Boston (which in themselves offered competing versions of the American dream). His colorful history of how the first World Series consolidated baseball's hold on the American imagination makes us see what one sportswriter meant when he wrote at the time, Baseball is the melting pot at a boil, the most democratic sport in the world. All in all, Masur believes, it still is.

About the Author

Louis P. Masur, a professor of history at City College of New York and the editor of Reviews in American History, is the author of 1831: Year of Eclipse (H&W, 2001). He lives in New Jersey with his wife and children.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809016365
Author:
Masur, Louis P.
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Subject:
Baseball - History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Baseball - Specific Teams
Subject:
Sports and Fitness-Baseball General
Edition Description:
Special and Rev
Series:
Baseball's First World
Publication Date:
19041031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 32 Black-and-White Illustration
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.588 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Baseball » General

Autumn Glory : Baseball's First World Series (03 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 256 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809016365 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A suspenseful account of the glorious days a century ago when our national madness began

A post-season series of games to establish supremacy in the major leagues was not inevitable in the baseball world. But in 1903 the owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates (in the well-established National League) challenged the Boston Americans (in the upstart American League) to a play-off, which he was sure his team would win. They didn't--and that wasn't the only surprise during what became the first World Series. In Autumn Glory, Louis P. Masur tells the riveting story of two agonizing weeks in which the stars blew it, unknown players stole the show, hysterical fans got into the act, and umpires had to hold on for dear life.

Before and even during the 1903 season, it had seemed that baseball might succumb to the forces that had been splintering the sport for decades: owners' greed, players' rowdyism, fans' unrest. Yet baseball prevailed, and Masur tells the equally dramatic story of how it did so, in a country preoccupied with labor strife and big-business ruthlessness, and anxious about the welfare of those crowding into cities such as Pittsburgh and Boston (which in themselves offered competing versions of the American dream). His colorful history of how the first World Series consolidated baseball's hold on the American imagination makes us see what one sportswriter meant when he wrote at the time, Baseball is the melting pot at a boil, the most democratic sport in the world. All in all, Masur believes, it still is.

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