Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Robogenesis

    Daniel H. Wilson 9780385537094

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$14.00
List price: $26.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
20 Partner Warehouse African American Studies- General

This title in other editions

Runaway America : Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (04 Edition)

by

Runaway America : Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (04 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fledhis master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

David Waldstreicher, a professor of history at Temple University, is the author of In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820 and the editor of Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia.
Scientist, revolutionary, abolitionist: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved Founding Father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not only to mention slaves themselves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

"Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings."—Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe
"[A] closely researched and fiercely reasoned book . . . The crucial contribution of [this book is] to demonstrate that Franklin made a willful choice to evade and forestall any connection between colonial white liberty and enslaved black liberty."—Konstantin Dierks, Journal of Social History
 
"A subtle analysis of Benjamin Franklin and the problem of freedom in America . . . This new volume probes deeply into one of the hardest and most unpleasant aspects of early American history, the fact that in a land that promised and celebrated freedom, a great many of its inhabitants were burdened with degrees of enforced unfreedom imposed by some of the same people who promised and celebrated liberty."—Brent Tarter, Richmond Times-Dispatch
 
"Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings."—Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe

"Bold and immensely readable . . . A stunning inquiry into the complicated, if not outright deceptive, anti-slavery legacy of America's favorite self-made man. Rigorous and firmly unsentimental, Runaway America deserves a wide readership. Its clever broad-mindedness makes one of the freshest, most original books written about America's 'best-known colonist and revolutionary' . . . What distinguishes Runaway America from a shabby hatchet job is Mr. Waldstreicher's keen intelligence and, above all, his refusal to condemn . . . That he succeeded in throwing historians off the scent for so long is a tribute to Franklin. That Runaway America has found him out and still deepened our sense of the man without flaying him is a tribute to Mr. Waldstreicher's own considerable gifts. It is no mean feat to say something smart and new about one of the most overstudied men in American history, and Mr. Waldstreicher's remarkable book leaves us to wonder what yet we may have to learn to understand the Founders."—Kirk Davis Swinehart, The New York Sun

"[This is an] intricately detailed analysis of Franklin's thought and actions. It likely will not sit well with some Franklin champions, who prefer to highlight the unambiguously antislavery statements of his later years. Those came very late, in 1790, just weeks before his death. The author suggests that it is a disservice to history, and to an understanding of Franklin, to conflate or confuse these statements with those from the long decades in which he 'played both sides of the issue.'"—Roger K. Miller, The Denver Post

"The enigma of Benjamin Franklin regarding the issue of slavery is brilliantly explored by David Waldstreicher . . . Against a backdrop of slavery, Runaway America offers a powerful portrait of 18th-century life, and of one of the key players in the drama of a revolution that freed a nation from the shackles of its mother country while keeping others in bondage."—Barrett R. Richardson, The Virginian-Pilot

"Waldstreicher's [study] rightly does not try to re-examine the entire life and political leanings of Franklin. Instead, it focuses on a subject that is often glossed over by biographers, and by Franklin himself: slavery, the American Revolution, and Franklin's true beliefs on the role of the slave in America . . . Runaway America's strength lies in the fact that it does not try to interpret or 'spin' any of Franklin's actions that seem at odds with each other. Instead, Waldstreicher presents them as many sides of a man who both employed and fought against the society he was struggling to conquer. Another strong point of the book is that it uses Franklin's own writings about slavery and puts them in the proper historical context. Hence the reader can see how Franklin's narratives through the years deal with the issue of the 'unfree' in America. He writes about this over and over, using the voice of a sugar plantation slave woman, a native Briton, a rural New Englander—each grappling with the same question: what does it mean to be free? Again, Waldstreicher rightly highlights how Franklin dealt with slavery issues in terms of America's struggles for equity with England. Overall, this is a good book that will leave the reader with a new understanding of both Franklin and how the thorny issue of slavery helped shape early America . . . Runaway America should take its place alongside Ellis, Ambrose, and McCollough."—Jennifer McCready, Curled Up With a Good Book

"In Runaway America, author David Waldstreicher reveals the myths and truths of one of America's most beloved founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin . . . [Waldstreicher] exposes the complex irony of human nature rarely considered in history books . . . [Runaway America is] heavily researched and [has] well-formulated arguments. Overall, Waldstreicher deserves applause for documenting the duality of human nature, thus exposing the ironic reality of Benjamin Franklin and examining the often blurred relationship between 'unfree' and 'free.'"—Nicole Sealey, QBR: The Black Book Review

"A careful reader of Franklin's writings and times, David Waldstreicher has given us an extraordinarily fresh look at Franklin, slavery, and the American Revolution."—Barbara Oberg, Princeton University

"Waldstreicher's Runaway America asks readers to reconsider Benjamin Franklin's relationship to slavery, without damning he man for the age in which he lived. In a balanced assessment, Waldstreicher neither exalts nor attacks Franklin, but instead examines how the Founding Father embodies the American paradox."—Jill Lepore, author of A Is for American: Letters and Other Characters in the Newly United States

"David Waldstreicher brilliantly cuts through the self-fashioning of Franklin, the master of spin. The familiar apprentice and runaway was also an employer of unfree labor, a slaveowner, an apologist for slavery, and a spokesman for slaveowning colonies. This is a corrosive corrective to the pieties about Franklin."—Alfred F. Young, author of Masquerade: The Life and Times of Deborah Sampson, Continental Soldier

"In this stunning book, David Waldstreicher shows how slavery was of fundamental importance not only in Benjamin Franklin's life but also in the story of the new American nation. Runaway America is at once a wonderful book to read and as penetrating a meditation on the link between American freedom and American slavery as has been published in more than a quarter century."—Shane White, author of Stories of Freedom in Black New York and coauthor of The Sounds of Slavery

"Benjamin Franklin is often considered one of America's first and greatest abolitionists, but in this unique work Waldstreicher shows that his life and success were in fact intimately tied to slavery. He relied on slave labor at home and in his businesses, argues Waldstreicher, selling advertisements to slave traders and publishing descriptions of runaway slaves. His criticism of slavery was always, at best, tentative and pragmatic, as shown by his suggestion to compromise on slave representation at the Constitutional Convention, resulting in the infamous three-fifths compromise. Well written and researched, this scholarly biography offers a balanced look at the practical Franklin, a man who often tried to be 'all things to all people.'"—Library Journal

"Why another biography of Franklin? Because this is a distinctive, long-overdue effort to ask some tough questions about someone who is usually given a pass for his genius and charm by otherwise critical historians and biographers . . . Temple University historian Waldstreicher skillfully sets Franklin's posture in the context of 18th-century Northern prevarication and racism, but the book's effect is to desacralize Franklin. It reveals the founder's dissimulation in his brilliant, beloved Autobiography and other writings that have been used—wrongly, it turns out—to place him among the nation's early antislavery reformers . . . This penetrating interpretation, one that's likely to dismay Franklin's hagiographers, is true to the man, his times, and the facts."—Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

David Waldstreicher, a professor of history at Temple University, is the author of In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820 and the editor of Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia. Scientist, revolutionary, abolitionist: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved Founding Father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not only to mention slaves themselves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom. Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings.--Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe A] closely researched and fiercely reasoned book . . . The crucial contribution of this book is] to demonstrate that Franklin made a willful choice to evade and forestall any connection between colonial white liberty and enslaved black liberty.--Konstantin Dierks, Journal of Social History A subtle analysis of Benjamin Franklin and the problem of freedom in America . . . This new volume probes deeply into one of the hardest and most unpleasant aspects of early American history, the fact that in a land that promised and celebrated freedom, a great many of its inhabitants were burdened with degrees of enforced unfreedom imposed by some of the same people who promised and celebrated liberty.--Brent Tarter, Richmond Times-Dispatch Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings.--Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe

Bold and immensely readable . . . A stunning inquiry into the complicated, if not outright deceptive, anti-slavery legacy of America's favorite self-made man. Rigorous and firmly unsentimental, Runaway America deserves a wide readership. Its clever broad-mindedness makes one of the freshest, most original books written about America's 'best-known colonist and revolutionary' . . . What distinguishes Runaway America from a shabby hatchet job is Mr. Waldstreicher's keen intelligence and, above all, his refusal to condemn . . . That he succeeded in throwing historians off the scent for so long is a tribute to Franklin. That Runaway America has found him out and still deepened our sense of the man without flaying him is a tribute to Mr. Waldstreicher's own considerable gifts. It is no mean feat to say something smart and new about one of the most overstudied men in American history, and Mr. Waldstreicher's remarkable book leaves us to wonder what yet we may have to learn to understand the Founders.--Kirk Davis Swinehart, The New York Sun

This is an] intricately detailed analysis of Franklin's thought and actions. It likely will not sit well with some Franklin champions, who prefer to highlight the unambiguously antislavery statements of his later years. Those came very late, in 1790, just

Synopsis:

Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

About the Author

David Waldstreicher, professor of history at Notre Dame, is author of In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism and editor of Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia (Bedford Books).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809083152
Author:
Waldstreicher, David
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Subject:
United States/Revolu
Subject:
tionary Period (1775-1800)
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
Benjamin Franklin, S
Publication Date:
20050831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.742 in

Other books you might like

  1. Landon Carter's Uneasy Kingdom:... Used Trade Paper $23.00
  2. The First Scientific American:... Used Hardcover $3.95
  3. The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin Used Trade Paper $4.50
  4. The Elements of Style Used Trade Paper $3.50
  5. Benjamin Franklin and the Politics... New Hardcover $44.50
  6. A Benjamin Franklin Reader Used Trade Paper $9.00

Related Subjects

» Biography » Historical
» Biography » Political
» History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
» History and Social Science » Sociology » Slavery
» History and Social Science » US History » Franklin, Benjamin

Runaway America : Benjamin Franklin, Slavery, and the American Revolution (04 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.00 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809083152 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

David Waldstreicher, a professor of history at Temple University, is the author of In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820 and the editor of Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia. Scientist, revolutionary, abolitionist: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved Founding Father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not only to mention slaves themselves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom. Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings.--Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe A] closely researched and fiercely reasoned book . . . The crucial contribution of this book is] to demonstrate that Franklin made a willful choice to evade and forestall any connection between colonial white liberty and enslaved black liberty.--Konstantin Dierks, Journal of Social History A subtle analysis of Benjamin Franklin and the problem of freedom in America . . . This new volume probes deeply into one of the hardest and most unpleasant aspects of early American history, the fact that in a land that promised and celebrated freedom, a great many of its inhabitants were burdened with degrees of enforced unfreedom imposed by some of the same people who promised and celebrated liberty.--Brent Tarter, Richmond Times-Dispatch Engaging and provocative . . . What Waldstreicher refreshingly offers is less a conventional biography than a critical reconsideration of Franklin's economic and social world, and his political thought, that focuses on the spectrum of freedom and unfreedom in Colonial America . . . Waldstreicher effectively undermines Franklin's antislavery reputation without falling into the modern habit of extreme moralistic dismissal or outright condemnation . . . Indispensable reading for an understanding of the Founders' generation, for all of its glory and shortcomings.--Eric Arnesen, The Boston Sunday Globe

Bold and immensely readable . . . A stunning inquiry into the complicated, if not outright deceptive, anti-slavery legacy of America's favorite self-made man. Rigorous and firmly unsentimental, Runaway America deserves a wide readership. Its clever broad-mindedness makes one of the freshest, most original books written about America's 'best-known colonist and revolutionary' . . . What distinguishes Runaway America from a shabby hatchet job is Mr. Waldstreicher's keen intelligence and, above all, his refusal to condemn . . . That he succeeded in throwing historians off the scent for so long is a tribute to Franklin. That Runaway America has found him out and still deepened our sense of the man without flaying him is a tribute to Mr. Waldstreicher's own considerable gifts. It is no mean feat to say something smart and new about one of the most overstudied men in American history, and Mr. Waldstreicher's remarkable book leaves us to wonder what yet we may have to learn to understand the Founders.--Kirk Davis Swinehart, The New York Sun

This is an] intricately detailed analysis of Franklin's thought and actions. It likely will not sit well with some Franklin champions, who prefer to highlight the unambiguously antislavery statements of his later years. Those came very late, in 1790, just

"Synopsis" by ,
Scientist, abolitionist, revolutionary: that is the Benjamin Franklin we know and celebrate. To this description, the talented young historian David Waldstreicher shows we must add runaway, slave master, and empire builder. But Runaway America does much more than revise our image of a beloved founding father. Finding slavery at the center of Franklin's life, Waldstreicher proves it was likewise central to the Revolution, America's founding, and the very notion of freedom we associate with both.

Franklin was the sole Founding Father who was once owned by someone else and was among the few to derive his fortune from slavery. As an indentured servant, Franklin fled his master before his term was complete; as a struggling printer, he built a financial empire selling newspapers that not only advertised the goods of a slave economy (not to mention slaves) but also ran the notices that led to the recapture of runaway servants. Perhaps Waldstreicher's greatest achievement is in showing that this was not an ironic outcome but a calculated one. America's freedom, no less than Franklin's, demanded that others forgo liberty.

Through the life of Franklin, Runaway America provides an original explanation to the paradox of American slavery and freedom.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.