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25 Remote Warehouse Gender Studies- Womens Studies

Sandino's Daughters: Testimonies of Nicaraguan Women in Struggle

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Sandino's Daughters: Testimonies of Nicaraguan Women in Struggle Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"A collection of varied and amazing lives, all bent on shaping history. Together, these experienced, undeterred Nicaraguan women offer powerful clues about a truly revolutionary and democratizing feminism."––Adrienne Rich

"If it were not for writers like Margaret, how would women around the world find each other when there is such an institutional effort to keep us apart and silent? Here Margaret brings us the voice of Sandino's daughters, honoring his hat and wearing their own, wiser now, having been part of political and personal revolution."––Holly Near

"Powerful, moving, and challenging. Everyone interested in decency and justice will want to read Sandino's Daughters Revisited."––Blanche Wiesen Cook

Sandino's Daughters, Margaret Randall's conversations with Nicaraguan women in their struggle against the dictator Somoza in 1979, brought the lives of a group of extraordinary female revolutionaries to the American and world public. The book remains a landmark. Now, a decade later, Randall returns to interview many of the same women and others. In Sandino's Daughters Revisited, they speak of their lives during and since the Sandinista administration, the ways in which the revolution made them strong––and also held them back. Ironically, the 1990 defeat of the Sandinistas at the ballot box has given Sandinista women greater freedom to express their feelings and ideas.

Randall interviewed these outspoken women from all walks of life: working-class Diana Espinoza, head bookkeeper of a employee-owned factory; Daisy Zamora, a vice minister of culture under the Sandinistas; and Vidaluz Meneses, daughter of a Somozan official, who ties her revolutionary ideals to her Catholicism. The voices of these women, along with nine others, lead us to recognize both the failed promises and continuing attraction of the Sandinista movement for women. This is a moving account of the relationship between feminism and revolution as it is expressed in the daily lives of Nicaraguan women.

 

Synopsis:

.

Synopsis:

First published in 1981 in the wake of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) revolution in Nicaragua, Sandino's Daughters can now be seen not as a triumph of revolutionary ideals, but as a triumph of the spirit. Through a series of interviews with participants at all levels in the resistance, Margaret Randall recounts the lives of ordinary women who became pillars of strength and perseverance during their decades-long involvement in the Sandinista struggle against the Somoza dictatorship. Believing firmly that women's liberation was inextricably linked with national liberation, many of these women were in the vanguard of the movement inspired by Augusto Sandino. At the peak of revolutionary activity, women from all classes and backgrounds comprised 30 percent of the Sandinista army. For many of these women, politics became one with the personal. Hindsight perhaps offers the greatest irony of the women's alliance with the FSLN in the fact that it was a woman, Violeta Chamorro, who challenged and defeated the Sandinistas in the free elections of 1990. Though lured by the revolutionary quixotism of a promise that lasted slightly more than a decade, the women of Sandino's Daughters will stand as a monument to all those who yearn to be free.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813522142
Author:
Randall, Margaret
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Location:
New Brunswick, NJ :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Central America
Subject:
Government (non-U.S.)
Subject:
Women's Studies - History
Subject:
Women soldiers
Subject:
Women and socialism
Subject:
Frente Sandinista de Liberacion Nacional
Subject:
Women soldiers -- Nicaragua -- Interviews.
Subject:
Latin America - Central America
Subject:
Government - International
Subject:
Interviews
Subject:
Women and socialism -- Nicaragua.
Subject:
Gender Studies-General
Subject:
Gender Studies-Womens Studies
Edition Number:
Rev. ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
172054
Publication Date:
19951031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 0.74 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Latin America » Nicaragua
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Central America
History and Social Science » World History » General

Sandino's Daughters: Testimonies of Nicaraguan Women in Struggle New Trade Paper
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$27.75 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813522142 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
.

"Synopsis" by , First published in 1981 in the wake of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) revolution in Nicaragua, Sandino's Daughters can now be seen not as a triumph of revolutionary ideals, but as a triumph of the spirit. Through a series of interviews with participants at all levels in the resistance, Margaret Randall recounts the lives of ordinary women who became pillars of strength and perseverance during their decades-long involvement in the Sandinista struggle against the Somoza dictatorship. Believing firmly that women's liberation was inextricably linked with national liberation, many of these women were in the vanguard of the movement inspired by Augusto Sandino. At the peak of revolutionary activity, women from all classes and backgrounds comprised 30 percent of the Sandinista army. For many of these women, politics became one with the personal. Hindsight perhaps offers the greatest irony of the women's alliance with the FSLN in the fact that it was a woman, Violeta Chamorro, who challenged and defeated the Sandinistas in the free elections of 1990. Though lured by the revolutionary quixotism of a promise that lasted slightly more than a decade, the women of Sandino's Daughters will stand as a monument to all those who yearn to be free.
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