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Remaking Chinese America : Immigration, Family, and Community, 1940-1965 (02 Edition)

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Remaking Chinese America : Immigration, Family, and Community, 1940-1965 (02 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

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Publisher Comments:

Xiaojian Zhao's Remaking Chinese America is an important addition to Chinese American history, focusing on family formation and reconstitution in an as yet little-studied era. --Roger Daniels, Charles Phelps Taft Professor of History, University of Cincinnati Using records from the Immigration and Naturalization Service as well as Chinatown newspapers, records from and about Chinese American organizations, and oral interviews, Zhao has presented a previously unknown perspective of Chinese America in a skillfully constructed mosaic. --Sue Fawn Chung, University of Nevada, Las Vegas In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside the country in order to explain these changing demographics. Careful attention is paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population. In defining the political circumstances that brought the Chinese together as a cohesive political body, Zhao delves into the complexities they faced when questioning their personal national allegiances during World War II and the Communist takeover of mainland China. Remaking Chinese America uses a wealth of primary sources, including oral histories, newspapers, genealogical documents, and immigration files to illuminate what it was like to be Chinese living in the United States during a period that--untilnow--has been little studied. Xiaojian Zhao is an associate professor of Asian American studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Synopsis:

In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside of the country in order to explain these changing demographics. She scrutinizes the repealed exclusion laws and the immigration laws enacted after 1940. Careful attention is also paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population.

Synopsis:

In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside of the country in order to explain these changing demographics. She scrutinizes the repealed exclusion laws and the immigration laws enacted after 1940. Careful attention is also paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population.

As members of a minority sharing a common cultural heritage as well as pressures from the larger society, Chinese Americans networked and struggled to gain equal rights during the cold war period. In defining the political circumstances that brought the Chinese together as a cohesive political body, Zhao also delves into the complexities they faced when questioning their personal national allegiances. Remaking Chinese America uses a wealth of primary sources, including oral histories, newspapers, genealogical documents, and immigration files to illuminate what it was like to be Chinese living in the United States during a period that—until now—has been little studied.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813530116
Author:
Zhao, Xiaojian
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Location:
New Brunswick, N.J.
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Minority Studies - Ethnic American
Subject:
China
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Chinese americans
Subject:
Sex role
Subject:
Cold war
Subject:
Chinese American families
Subject:
Chinese American women
Subject:
World War, 19
Subject:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects.
Subject:
United States Emigration and immigration.
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Immigration
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
18
Publication Date:
20011131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
15
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

Business » Communication
Business » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Chinese American
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Remaking Chinese America : Immigration, Family, and Community, 1940-1965 (02 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 288 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813530116 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside of the country in order to explain these changing demographics. She scrutinizes the repealed exclusion laws and the immigration laws enacted after 1940. Careful attention is also paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population.
"Synopsis" by ,

In Remaking Chinese America, Xiaojian Zhao explores the myriad forces that changed and unified Chinese Americans during a key period in American history. Prior to 1940, this immigrant community was predominantly male, but between 1940 and 1965 it was transformed into a family-centered American ethnic community. Zhao pays special attention to forces both inside and outside of the country in order to explain these changing demographics. She scrutinizes the repealed exclusion laws and the immigration laws enacted after 1940. Careful attention is also paid to evolving gender roles, since women constituted the majority of newcomers, significantly changing the sex ratio of the Chinese American population.

As members of a minority sharing a common cultural heritage as well as pressures from the larger society, Chinese Americans networked and struggled to gain equal rights during the cold war period. In defining the political circumstances that brought the Chinese together as a cohesive political body, Zhao also delves into the complexities they faced when questioning their personal national allegiances. Remaking Chinese America uses a wealth of primary sources, including oral histories, newspapers, genealogical documents, and immigration files to illuminate what it was like to be Chinese living in the United States during a period that—until now—has been little studied.

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