The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$18.00
List price: $23.00
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
1 Partner Warehouse Ethnic Studies- General

Manifest Destinies (07 Edition)

by

Manifest Destinies (07 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

View the Table of Contents

Read the Introduction

We Know We're Not White: Author Interview on San Diego Weekly Reader

aGomez sets out to write aan antidote to historical amnesia about the key nineteenth-century events that produced the first Mexican Americans.a A law professor at the University of New Mexico, Gomez takes a three-pronged approach: she looks at Chicano history via sociology, history, and law, using New Mexico as a case study. At the heart of the book is the idea that Manifest Destiny was not, according to Gomez, a neutral political theory. Rather, it was a potent ideology that endowed white Americans with a sense of entitlement to the land and racial superiority over its inhabitants.a

--La Bloga

aShows the impacts (then, as now) of the dominant white racist frame coming in from outside what was once northern Mexico.a--Racism Review

A]n interesting and comprehensive look at what New Mexicans really lost after being conquered by the United States.

--The Albuquerque Journal

aGomezas insights into the struggles at play in the nineteenth-century Southwest are extremely relevant for today--a time in which identity politics are still predominant in discussions about culture. . . . With Chicanos making up the youngest racial group in America (34 percent are under the age of 18), the complicated relationship between the U.S. and its Mexican citizens is clearly something that is going to be on the table for a long time to come. Manifest Destinies presents a portrait of the forces that were present when this group was still in its infancy.a

--Pop Matters

aAre Mexican Americans a racial or ethnic group? This is the important question ManifestDestinies asks and answers. . . . Marvelous, dense, and richly researched.a

--Ramon A. Gutierrez, University of Chicago

aHighlights the largely neglected history of multiracial populations that, throughout our nationas history, have come together along the frontier. With her analysis of racial ideologies . . . Gomez promises to make a valuable contribution to this literature.a

--Rachel Moran, author of Interracial Intimacy: The Regulation of Race and Romance

aAnyone interested in understanding the historical experience of the largest ethnic group in the country will find Manifest Destinies both timely and of great interest. . . . Simply put, her work is first rate in every way.a

--Tomas Almaguer, author of Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California

In both the historic record and the popular imagination, the story of nineteenth-century westward expansion in America has been characterized by notions of annexation rather than colonialism, of opening rather than conquering, and of settling unpopulated lands rather than displacing existing populations.

Using the territory that is now New Mexico as a case study, Manifest Destinies traces the origins of Mexican Americans as a racial group in the United States, paying particular attention to shifting meanings of race and law in the nineteenth century.

Laura E. Gomez explores the central paradox of Mexican American racial status as entailing the law's designation of Mexican Americans as white and their simultaneous social position as non-white in American society. She tells a neglected story of conflict, conquest, cooperation, and competition among Mexicans, Indians, andEuro-Americans, the regionas three main populations who were the key architects and victims of the laws that dictated what oneas race was and how people would be treated by the law according to oneas race.

Gomezas pathbreaking work--spanning the disciplines of law, history, and sociology--reveals how the construction of Mexicans as an American racial group proved central to the larger process of restructuring the American racial order from the Mexican War (1846-48) to the early twentieth century. The emphasis on white-over-black relations during this period has obscured the significant role played by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and the colonization of northern Mexico in the racial subordination of black Americans.

Synopsis:

This major new series reproduces an authoritative selection of the most significant articles in different areas of psychology. It focuses in particular on influential articles which are not found in other similar colelctions.

Many of these articles are only available in specialized journals and therfore are not accessible in every library. This landmark series will make a contribution to scholarship and teaching in psychology. It will imorove access to important areas of literature which are difficult to locate, even in the archives of many libraries throughout the world.

Important features in each book make the series an essential research and reference tool, including introductions written by the individual editors providing a lucid survey of difference branches of psychology. The pagination of the original articles has been deliberately retained to facilitate ease of reference. A comprehensive author and subject index guides the reader instantly to major and minor topics within the literature.

Synopsis:

Watch the Author Interview on KNME

In both the historic record and the popular imagination, the story of nineteenth-century westward expansion in America has been characterized by notions of annexation rather than colonialism, of opening rather than conquering, and of settling unpopulated lands rather than displacing existing populations.

Using the territory that is now New Mexico as a case study, Manifest Destinies traces the origins of Mexican Americans as a racial group in the United States, paying particular attention to shifting meanings of race and law in the nineteenth century.

Laura E. Gómez explores the central paradox of Mexican American racial status as entailing the law's designation of Mexican Americans as &#“white” and their simultaneous social position as non-white in American society. She tells a neglected story of conflict, conquest, cooperation, and competition among Mexicans, Indians, and Euro-Americans, the regions three main populations who were the key architects and victims of the laws that dictated what ones race was and how people would be treated by the law according to ones race.

Gómezs path breaking work—spanning the disciplines of law, history, and sociology—reveals how the construction of Mexicans as an American racial group proved central to the larger process of restructuring the American racial order from the Mexican War (1846-48) to the early twentieth century. The emphasis on white-over-black relations during this period has obscured the significant role played by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and the colonization of northern Mexico in the racial subordination of black Americans.

About the Author

A native New Mexican, Laura E. Gómez is Professor of Law and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She is the author of Misconceiving Mothers: Legislators, Prosecutors, and the Politics of Prenatal Drug Exposure.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814732052
Subtitle:
The Making of the Mexican American Race
Author:
Gomez, Laura E.
Author:
Gomez, Laura
Author:
Aronson, Elliot
Author:
Pratkanis, Anthony
Publisher:
NYU Press
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Legal History
Subject:
Latin America - Mexico
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Hispanic American Studies
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Subject:
Reference
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20080901
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Driven Out: The Forgotten War... Used Hardcover $11.95
  2. La Nueva California: Latinos in the... Used Trade Paper $24.50
  3. Essential Guide to Federal... Used Trade Paper $9.75
  4. Latino Spin: Public Image and the... Used Trade Paper $18.00

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Latin American
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century

Manifest Destinies (07 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.00 In Stock
Product details 256 pages New York University Press - English 9780814732052 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This major new series reproduces an authoritative selection of the most significant articles in different areas of psychology. It focuses in particular on influential articles which are not found in other similar colelctions.

Many of these articles are only available in specialized journals and therfore are not accessible in every library. This landmark series will make a contribution to scholarship and teaching in psychology. It will imorove access to important areas of literature which are difficult to locate, even in the archives of many libraries throughout the world.

Important features in each book make the series an essential research and reference tool, including introductions written by the individual editors providing a lucid survey of difference branches of psychology. The pagination of the original articles has been deliberately retained to facilitate ease of reference. A comprehensive author and subject index guides the reader instantly to major and minor topics within the literature.

"Synopsis" by , Watch the Author Interview on KNME

In both the historic record and the popular imagination, the story of nineteenth-century westward expansion in America has been characterized by notions of annexation rather than colonialism, of opening rather than conquering, and of settling unpopulated lands rather than displacing existing populations.

Using the territory that is now New Mexico as a case study, Manifest Destinies traces the origins of Mexican Americans as a racial group in the United States, paying particular attention to shifting meanings of race and law in the nineteenth century.

Laura E. Gómez explores the central paradox of Mexican American racial status as entailing the law's designation of Mexican Americans as &#“white” and their simultaneous social position as non-white in American society. She tells a neglected story of conflict, conquest, cooperation, and competition among Mexicans, Indians, and Euro-Americans, the regions three main populations who were the key architects and victims of the laws that dictated what ones race was and how people would be treated by the law according to ones race.

Gómezs path breaking work—spanning the disciplines of law, history, and sociology—reveals how the construction of Mexicans as an American racial group proved central to the larger process of restructuring the American racial order from the Mexican War (1846-48) to the early twentieth century. The emphasis on white-over-black relations during this period has obscured the significant role played by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and the colonization of northern Mexico in the racial subordination of black Americans.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.