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1 Burnside African American Studies- General

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Talking at Trena's: Everyday Conversations at an African American Tavern

by

Talking at Trena's: Everyday Conversations at an African American Tavern Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"By turn sad, hilarious, shocking, and touching, these conversations are always revealing: May makes good use of them in suggesting what they tell us about how these men experience, for example, racism and class bias and ho they behave in various social contexts."

Library Journal

"An engaging text. May shows why a space like Trena's is essential and why people become regulars."

The Southern Communication Journal

"A face-paced book...[that's] hard to put down...May should be applauded for his excellent work as he taps into and reveals the lifestyles and attitudes of the customers who patronize Trena's"

Black Issues Book Review

Talking at Trena's is an ethnography conducted in a bar in an African American, middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's southside. May's work focuses on how the mostly black, working- and middle-class patrons of Trena's talk about race, work, class, women, relationships, the media, and life in general. May recognizes tavern talk as a form of social play and symbolic performace within the tavern, as well as an indication of the social problems African Americans confront on a daily basis.

Following a long tradition of research on informal gathering places, May's work reveals, though close description and analysis of ethnographic data, how African Americans come to understand the racial dynamics of American society which impact their jobs, entertainment—particularly television programs—and their social interactions with peers, employers, and others. Talking at Trena's provides a window into the laughs, complaints, experiences, and strategies which Trena's regulars share for managing daily life outside the safety and comfort of the tavern.

Synopsis:

Arkansas, 1943. The Deep South during the heart of Jim Crow-era segregation. A Japanese-American person boards a bus, and immediately is faced with a dilemma. Not white. Not black. Where to sit?

By elucidating the experience of interstitial ethnic groups such as Mexican, Asian, and Native Americans—groups that are held to be neither black nor white—Leslie Bow explores how the color line accommodated—or refused to accommodate—“other” ethnicities within a binary racial system. Analyzing pre- and post-1954 American literature, film, autobiography, government documents, ethnography, photographs, and popular culture, Bow investigates the ways in which racially “in-between” people and communities were brought to heel within the Souths prevailing cultural logic, while locating the interstitial as a site of cultural anxiety and negotiation.

Spanning the pre- to the post- segregation eras, Partly Colored traces the compelling history of “third race” individuals in the U.S. South, and in the process forces us to contend with the multiracial panorama that constitutes American culture and history.

Synopsis:

Talking at Trena's is an ethnography conducted in a bar in an African American, middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's southside. May's work focuses on how the mostly black, working- and middle-class patrons of Trena's talk about race, work, class, women, relationships, the media, and life in general. May recognizes tavern talk as a form of social play and symbolic performace within the tavern, as well as an indication of the social problems African Americans confront on a daily basis.

Following a long tradition of research on informal gathering places, May's work reveals, though close description and analysis of ethnographic data, how African Americans come to understand the racial dynamics of American society which impact their jobs, entertainment—particularly television programs—and their social interactions with peers, employers, and others. Talking at Trena's provides a window into the laughs, complaints, experiences, and strategies which Trena's regulars share for managing daily life outside the safety and comfort of the tavern.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-203) and index.

About the Author

Reuben A. Buford May is Professor of Sociology at Texas A & M University. He is the author of Talking at Trenas: Everyday Conversations at an African American Tavern (NYU Press, 2001).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814756720
Author:
May, Reuben A. Buford
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
May, Reuben A. Buford A. Buford
Author:
May, Reuben A. Buford
Author:
May, Reuben
Author:
Bow, Leslie
Location:
New York
Subject:
United states
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Chicago
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Minority Studies - Race Relations
Subject:
Racism
Subject:
Middle class
Subject:
Social interaction
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Bars
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
AFRO-AMERICANS_SOCIAL LIFE AND CUSTOMS
Subject:
MIDDLE CLASS_UNITED STATES
Subject:
Bars (Drinking establishments)
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.)
Subject:
BLACK STUDIES_USA
Subject:
SOCIOLOGY, SOCIAL STUDIES_USA
Subject:
African Americans - Social life and customs
Subject:
United States Race relations.
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Subject:
Discrimination & Race Relations
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
57
Publication Date:
20010831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration

Talking at Trena's: Everyday Conversations at an African American Tavern Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 200 pages New York University Press - English 9780814756720 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Arkansas, 1943. The Deep South during the heart of Jim Crow-era segregation. A Japanese-American person boards a bus, and immediately is faced with a dilemma. Not white. Not black. Where to sit?

By elucidating the experience of interstitial ethnic groups such as Mexican, Asian, and Native Americans—groups that are held to be neither black nor white—Leslie Bow explores how the color line accommodated—or refused to accommodate—“other” ethnicities within a binary racial system. Analyzing pre- and post-1954 American literature, film, autobiography, government documents, ethnography, photographs, and popular culture, Bow investigates the ways in which racially “in-between” people and communities were brought to heel within the Souths prevailing cultural logic, while locating the interstitial as a site of cultural anxiety and negotiation.

Spanning the pre- to the post- segregation eras, Partly Colored traces the compelling history of “third race” individuals in the U.S. South, and in the process forces us to contend with the multiracial panorama that constitutes American culture and history.

"Synopsis" by , Talking at Trena's is an ethnography conducted in a bar in an African American, middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's southside. May's work focuses on how the mostly black, working- and middle-class patrons of Trena's talk about race, work, class, women, relationships, the media, and life in general. May recognizes tavern talk as a form of social play and symbolic performace within the tavern, as well as an indication of the social problems African Americans confront on a daily basis.

Following a long tradition of research on informal gathering places, May's work reveals, though close description and analysis of ethnographic data, how African Americans come to understand the racial dynamics of American society which impact their jobs, entertainment—particularly television programs—and their social interactions with peers, employers, and others. Talking at Trena's provides a window into the laughs, complaints, experiences, and strategies which Trena's regulars share for managing daily life outside the safety and comfort of the tavern.

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