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This title in other editions

Signs of Resistance: American Deaf Cultural History, 1900 to World War II (History of Disability)

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Signs of Resistance: American Deaf Cultural History, 1900 to World War II (History of Disability) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003

"Burch offers insightful comparisons. Her book is important to the fields of Deaf studies and disability studies, but it will appeal to social historians as well."

Journal of American History

During the nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly.

Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history: using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity and political organization.

Synopsis:

Much contemporary political philosophy has been a debate between utilitarianism on the one hand and Kantian, or rights-based ethic has recently faced a growing challenge from a different direction, from a view that argues for a deeper understanding of citizenship and community than the liberal ethic allows.

The writings collected in this volume present leading statements of rights-based liberalism and of the communitarian, or civic republican alternatives to that position. The principle of selection has been to shift the focus from the familiar debate between utilitarians and Kantian liberals in order to consider a more powerful challenge ot the rights-based ethic, a challenge indebted, broadly speaking, to Aristotle, Hegel, and the civic republican tradition.

Contributors include Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, Alasdair MacIntyre.

Synopsis:

During the nineteenth century, American schools for Deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, a developing oralist movement sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring Deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed over-whelmingly. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch proves them wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. Drawing from such resources as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity, and political organization.

About the Author

Susan Burch is an Associate Professor of History at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814798942
Author:
Burch, Susan
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Sandel, Michael
Location:
New York
Subject:
Handicapped
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1900-1945)
Subject:
TEACHING OF HEARING-IMPAIRED PERSONS_USA
Subject:
SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY_USA
Subject:
Deaf
Subject:
Sign Language
Subject:
DEAF_EDUCATION
Subject:
DEAF_MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Deaf -- United States -- Social conditions.
Subject:
Deaf - United States - History - 20th century
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Subject:
General Political Science
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
History of Disability
Publication Date:
20041131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
230
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Disability
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Languages » Deaf Studies » Deaf Culture
Languages » Deaf Studies » Sign Language

Signs of Resistance: American Deaf Cultural History, 1900 to World War II (History of Disability) New Trade Paper
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Product details 230 pages New York University Press - English 9780814798942 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Much contemporary political philosophy has been a debate between utilitarianism on the one hand and Kantian, or rights-based ethic has recently faced a growing challenge from a different direction, from a view that argues for a deeper understanding of citizenship and community than the liberal ethic allows.

The writings collected in this volume present leading statements of rights-based liberalism and of the communitarian, or civic republican alternatives to that position. The principle of selection has been to shift the focus from the familiar debate between utilitarians and Kantian liberals in order to consider a more powerful challenge ot the rights-based ethic, a challenge indebted, broadly speaking, to Aristotle, Hegel, and the civic republican tradition.

Contributors include Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, Alasdair MacIntyre.

"Synopsis" by , During the nineteenth century, American schools for Deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, a developing oralist movement sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring Deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed over-whelmingly. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch proves them wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. Drawing from such resources as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity, and political organization.

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