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Lewis and Clark through Indian Eyes: Nine Indian Writers on the Legacy of the Expedition (Vintage)

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Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

For the first time in the two hundred years since Lewis and Clark led their expedition from St. Louis to the Pacific, we hear the other side of the story — as we listen to nine descendants of the Indians whose homelands were traversed.

Among those who speak: Newspaper editor Mark Trahant writes of his childhood belief that he was descended from Clark and what his own research uncovers. Award-winning essayist and fiction writer Debra Magpie Earling describes the tribal ways that helped her nineteenth-century Salish ancestors survive, and that still work their magic today. Montana political figure Bill Yellowtail tells of the efficiency of Indian trade networks, explaining how axes that the expedition traded for food in the Mandan and Hidatsa villages of Kansas had already arrived in Nez Perce country by the time Lewis and Clark got there a few months and 1,000 miles later. Umatilla tribal leader Roberta Conner compares Lewis and Clark's journal entries about her people with what was actually going on, wittily questioning Clark's notion that the natives believed the white men came from the clouds — in other words, they were gods. Writer and artist N. Scott Momaday ends the book with a moving tribute to the most difficult of journeys, calling it, in the truest sense, for both the men who entered the unknown and those who watched, a vision quest, with the visions gained being of profound consequence.

Some of the essays are based on family stories, some on tribal or American history, still others on the particular circumstances of a tribe today — but each reflects the expedition's impact through the prism of the author's own, or the tribe's, point of view.

Thoughtful, moving, provocative, Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes is an exploration of history — and a study of survival — that expands our knowledge of our country's first inhabitants. It also provides a fascinating and invaluable new perspective on the Lewis and Clark expedition itself and its place in the long history of our continent.

Review:

"From perspectives as diverse as the tribes whose lands Meriwether Lewis and William Clark traversed, these nine essays offer an other-side-of-the-coin view of that historic 1803 mission. 'What impact, good or bad, immediate or long-range, did the Indians experience from the Lewis and Clark expedition?' editors Josephy and Jaffe asked their contributors. The answers, fragmented and sometimes luminous, provide a kaleidoscopic vision of Native American opinions about the trip. Vine Deloria Jr., a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota, argues that 'we often tend to clothe the accounts of Lewis and Clark in more heroic terms than they deserve.' Pulitzer Prize-winning Kiowa N. Scott Momaday (House Made of Dawn) provides a creative evocation of historic 'voices of encounter' which includes a section in the voice of Sacagawea. More prosaically, Bill Yellowtail, a Crow, sees Lewis and Clark as 'envoys for free-trade agreements, long prior to NAFTA and CAFTA and the WTO.' Several authors recall how the lore and history of Lewis and Clark were transmitted to them by older relatives. A popular historian and a respected scholar of Indian affairs, Josephy died in October 2005. Main selection of the History Book Club." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The most compelling Lewis and Clark-related book I've ever read in that it challenged almost every historical assumption I held about the expedition and provided a much-needed, long-overlooked perspective as voiced through Native Americans." Oregonian

Review:

"Some of the essays celebrate the history of the Native groups that came into contact with the Lewis and Clark expedition; others reflect the justifiable anger that many Native populations still hold toward the U.S. government for the treatment that they have received over the centuries." Library Journal

Review:

"[An] informative and moving collection." School Library Journal

Synopsis:

At the heart of this landmark collection of essays rests a single question: What impact, good or bad, immediate or long-range, did Lewis and Clark's journey have on the Indians whose homelands they traversed? The nine writers in this volume each provide their own unique answers; from Pulitzer prize-winner N. Scott Momaday, who offers a haunting essay evoking the voices of the past; to Debra Magpie Earling's illumination of her ancestral family, their survival, and the magic they use to this day; to Mark N. Trahant's attempt to trace his own blood back to Clark himself; and Roberta Conner's comparisons of the explorer's journals with the accounts of the expedition passed down to her. Incisive and compelling, these essays shed new light on our understanding of this landmark journey into the American West.

About the Author

Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., a leading historian of the American West, was the author of many award-winning books, including The Patriot Chiefs, The Indian Heritage of America, Now That the Buffalo's Gone, The Civil War in the American West, 500 Nations, and A Walk Toward Oregon. He was a vice president and editor of American Heritage magazine, the founding chairman of the board of trustees of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, and president of the Western History Association. Josephy died in the fall of 2005, shortly after completing this book.

Table of Contents

Author's Note

Map

Introduction

PART ONE

Frenchmen, Bears, and Sandbars

by Vine Deloria, Jr.

What We See

by Debra Magpie Earling

Who's Your Daddy?

by Mark D. Trahant

Merriwether and Billy and the Indian Business

by Bill Yellowtail

Our People Have Always Been Here

by Roberta Conner

PART TWO

Mandan and Hidatsa of the Upper Missouri

by Gerard A. Baker

We Ya Oo Yet Soyapo

by Allen V. Pinkham, Sr.

The Ceremony at Ne-Ah-Coxie

by Roberta and Richard Basch

The Voices of Encounter

by N. Scott Momaday

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400077496
Author:
Josephy Jr., Alvin M.
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Author:
Josephy, Alvin M.,
Author:
Alvin M. Josephy, JR.
Author:
Josephy, Alvin M., Jr.
Author:
Edited by Alvin M. Josephy
Author:
Edited by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.
Subject:
United States - 19th Century/Old West
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
Frontier and pioneer life
Subject:
Lewis, Meriwether
Subject:
Lewis, Meriwether - Relations with Indians
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
history;native americans;lewis and clark;american west;native american
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20070631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 ILLUSTRATIONS
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.02x5.30x.63 in. .52 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Native American » Pacific Northwest
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Lewis and Clark
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Lewis and Clark through Indian Eyes: Nine Indian Writers on the Legacy of the Expedition (Vintage) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.00 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Random House - English 9781400077496 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "From perspectives as diverse as the tribes whose lands Meriwether Lewis and William Clark traversed, these nine essays offer an other-side-of-the-coin view of that historic 1803 mission. 'What impact, good or bad, immediate or long-range, did the Indians experience from the Lewis and Clark expedition?' editors Josephy and Jaffe asked their contributors. The answers, fragmented and sometimes luminous, provide a kaleidoscopic vision of Native American opinions about the trip. Vine Deloria Jr., a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota, argues that 'we often tend to clothe the accounts of Lewis and Clark in more heroic terms than they deserve.' Pulitzer Prize-winning Kiowa N. Scott Momaday (House Made of Dawn) provides a creative evocation of historic 'voices of encounter' which includes a section in the voice of Sacagawea. More prosaically, Bill Yellowtail, a Crow, sees Lewis and Clark as 'envoys for free-trade agreements, long prior to NAFTA and CAFTA and the WTO.' Several authors recall how the lore and history of Lewis and Clark were transmitted to them by older relatives. A popular historian and a respected scholar of Indian affairs, Josephy died in October 2005. Main selection of the History Book Club." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The most compelling Lewis and Clark-related book I've ever read in that it challenged almost every historical assumption I held about the expedition and provided a much-needed, long-overlooked perspective as voiced through Native Americans."
"Review" by , "Some of the essays celebrate the history of the Native groups that came into contact with the Lewis and Clark expedition; others reflect the justifiable anger that many Native populations still hold toward the U.S. government for the treatment that they have received over the centuries."
"Review" by , "[An] informative and moving collection."
"Synopsis" by , At the heart of this landmark collection of essays rests a single question: What impact, good or bad, immediate or long-range, did Lewis and Clark's journey have on the Indians whose homelands they traversed? The nine writers in this volume each provide their own unique answers; from Pulitzer prize-winner N. Scott Momaday, who offers a haunting essay evoking the voices of the past; to Debra Magpie Earling's illumination of her ancestral family, their survival, and the magic they use to this day; to Mark N. Trahant's attempt to trace his own blood back to Clark himself; and Roberta Conner's comparisons of the explorer's journals with the accounts of the expedition passed down to her. Incisive and compelling, these essays shed new light on our understanding of this landmark journey into the American West.
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