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The Ginkgo Light

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The Ginkgo Light Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

A temple near the hypocenter of the atomic blast at Hiroshima was disintegrated, but its ginkgo tree survived to bud and bloom. Arthur Sze extends this metaphor of survival and perseverance to transform the world's factual darkness into precarious splendor. "Each hour teems," Sze writes, as he ingeniously integrates the world's miraculous and mundane — a woodpecker drilling a utility pole or a 1300-year-old lotus seed — into a moving, visionary journey.

Review:

"Sze's sparkling ninth collection is largely obsessed with people, animals, plants and planets, caught in moments that suggest (without exactly revealing) their place in a cosmic order. In the first poem, 'a praying mantis on the floor sips water,' 'an ex-army officer turned critic frets,' a welder watches an overpass, 'teenage girls compare bra sizes,' 'light from a partial lunar eclipse/ diffuses down skylight walls'; in the last 'Cottonwood leaves/ drift on the surface; a polar bear leaps off ice.' In between, the images — as in the compound eye of a beautiful insect — add up to a persistent, even a single-minded, whole: Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts. At worst, the poetry looks like a set of lists, an interminable photo album; at best, as he says, 'we lift and turn the incidents until... we find their true and living place.' Sze (Quipu) weaves southwestern sights, Native lore, pre-Columbian peoples and languages, and East Asian poetry and thought throughout his verse, along with almost photographic reports on things seen: for him 'Memory is encounter: each incident,// a bee thrumming in a hive.' (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Classically elegant." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Sze's list-laden sequences capture the world's manifold facts one by one, then through discursive commentary exact from them a sense not only of aesthetic order but of universal cause and effect." Boston Review

Review:

"Whether incorporating nature, philosophy, history, or science, Sze's poems are expansive. They unfold like the time-slowed cinematic recording of a flower's blooming... Sze has a refreshingly original sensibility and style, and he approaches writing like a collagist by joining disparate elements into a cohesive whole." Booklist

Review:

"Sze's images and metaphors are fresh and dynamic, and again, the loose connections allow him to orchestrate a quotidian symphony." Rain Taxi

Review:

"Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts." Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

Arthur Sze incorporates history and science, Native American and Asian perspectives, into a transformative vision.

Synopsis:

“Classically elegant.”—The New York Times Book Review

Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts." —Publishers Weekly

“Sze’s list-laden sequences capture the world’s manifold facts one by one, then through discursive commentary exact from them a sense not only of aesthetic order but of universal cause and effect.”—Boston Review

"Sze...here captures the energy of life in overshadowed daily events....His poems mine everything from geography, history, and biology to philosophy and nature, interweaving them to create a complex and luminous poetic texture....His poetry is an experience of awakening and pleasure that all serious students of contemporary poetry should have." —Library Journal

"Whether incorporating nature, philosophy, history, or science, Sze's poems are expansive. They unfold like the time-slowed cinematic recording of a flower's blooming...Sze has a refreshingly original sensibility and style, and he approaches writing like a collagist by joining disparate elements into a cohesive whole." —Booklist

A temple near the hypocenter of the atomic blast at Hiroshima was disintegrated, but its ginkgo tree survived to bud and bloom. Arthur Sze extends this metaphor of survival and perseverance to transform the world’s factual darkness into precarious splendor. “Each hour teems,” Sze writes, as he ingeniously integrates the world’s miraculous and mundane—a woodpecker drilling a utility pole or a 1300-year-old lotus seed—into a moving, visionary journey.

Mayans charted Venus’s motion across the sky,

poured chocolate into jars and interred them

with the dead. A woman dips three bowls into

hair’s fur glaze, places them in a kiln, anticipates

removing them, red-hot, to a shelf to cool.

When samba melodies have dissipated into air,

when lights wrapped around a willow have vanished,

what pattern of shifting lines leads to Duration?

Arthur Sze, one of America’s leading poets, is the author of nine books of poetry and translation. He is professor emeritus of creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts and just completed a term as Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

About the Author

A professor emeritus at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where he taught for twenty-two years, Arthur Sze was the first Poet Laureate of Santa Fe (2006-2008). He is the author of eight books of poetry, including The Ginkgo Light (2009), Quipu (2005), The Redshifting Web: Poems 1970-1998 (1998), Archipelago (1995), and one book of translations, The Silk Dragon: Translations from the Chinese (2001) from Copper Canyon Press. He is also the editor of Chinese Writers on Writing (Trinity University Press, 2010).

Arthur is the recipient of many awards, including a PEN Southwest Book Award for Poetry, a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an American Book Award, a Lannan Literary Award, two National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing fellowships, a Howard Foundation Fellowship, an Asian American Literary Award, a Western States Book Award for Translation, as well as grants from the Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry.

His poems have been translated into Albanian, Bosnian, Chinese, Dutch, Italian, Romanian, Spanish, and Turkish, and he has read his poetry at such international festivals as the XIX International Poetry Festival of Medellín (2009), the Delhi International Literary Festival (2008), the Yellow Mountain Poetry Festival in England (2008), the Yellow Mountain Poetry Festival in China (2007), the Pacific International Poetry Festival (Taiwan, 2008), Poetry International (Rotterdam, 2007), and the Hong Kong International Literary Festival (2002).

Product Details

ISBN:
9781556592997
Author:
Sze, Arthur
Publisher:
Copper Canyon Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Single Author / American
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20090631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
96
Dimensions:
9 x 6.1 x 0.3 in 5 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » American » Asian American

The Ginkgo Light Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.00 In Stock
Product details 96 pages Copper Canyon Press - English 9781556592997 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Sze's sparkling ninth collection is largely obsessed with people, animals, plants and planets, caught in moments that suggest (without exactly revealing) their place in a cosmic order. In the first poem, 'a praying mantis on the floor sips water,' 'an ex-army officer turned critic frets,' a welder watches an overpass, 'teenage girls compare bra sizes,' 'light from a partial lunar eclipse/ diffuses down skylight walls'; in the last 'Cottonwood leaves/ drift on the surface; a polar bear leaps off ice.' In between, the images — as in the compound eye of a beautiful insect — add up to a persistent, even a single-minded, whole: Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts. At worst, the poetry looks like a set of lists, an interminable photo album; at best, as he says, 'we lift and turn the incidents until... we find their true and living place.' Sze (Quipu) weaves southwestern sights, Native lore, pre-Columbian peoples and languages, and East Asian poetry and thought throughout his verse, along with almost photographic reports on things seen: for him 'Memory is encounter: each incident,// a bee thrumming in a hive.' (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Classically elegant."
"Review" by , "Sze's list-laden sequences capture the world's manifold facts one by one, then through discursive commentary exact from them a sense not only of aesthetic order but of universal cause and effect."
"Review" by , "Whether incorporating nature, philosophy, history, or science, Sze's poems are expansive. They unfold like the time-slowed cinematic recording of a flower's blooming... Sze has a refreshingly original sensibility and style, and he approaches writing like a collagist by joining disparate elements into a cohesive whole."
"Review" by , "Sze's images and metaphors are fresh and dynamic, and again, the loose connections allow him to orchestrate a quotidian symphony."
"Review" by , "Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts."
"Synopsis" by ,
Arthur Sze incorporates history and science, Native American and Asian perspectives, into a transformative vision.
"Synopsis" by ,

“Classically elegant.”—The New York Times Book Review

Sze's free verse emphasizes at once how difficult, and how necessary, it is for us to imagine our world as a system whose ecologies and societies require us to care for all their interdependent parts." —Publishers Weekly

“Sze’s list-laden sequences capture the world’s manifold facts one by one, then through discursive commentary exact from them a sense not only of aesthetic order but of universal cause and effect.”—Boston Review

"Sze...here captures the energy of life in overshadowed daily events....His poems mine everything from geography, history, and biology to philosophy and nature, interweaving them to create a complex and luminous poetic texture....His poetry is an experience of awakening and pleasure that all serious students of contemporary poetry should have." —Library Journal

"Whether incorporating nature, philosophy, history, or science, Sze's poems are expansive. They unfold like the time-slowed cinematic recording of a flower's blooming...Sze has a refreshingly original sensibility and style, and he approaches writing like a collagist by joining disparate elements into a cohesive whole." —Booklist

A temple near the hypocenter of the atomic blast at Hiroshima was disintegrated, but its ginkgo tree survived to bud and bloom. Arthur Sze extends this metaphor of survival and perseverance to transform the world’s factual darkness into precarious splendor. “Each hour teems,” Sze writes, as he ingeniously integrates the world’s miraculous and mundane—a woodpecker drilling a utility pole or a 1300-year-old lotus seed—into a moving, visionary journey.

Mayans charted Venus’s motion across the sky,

poured chocolate into jars and interred them

with the dead. A woman dips three bowls into

hair’s fur glaze, places them in a kiln, anticipates

removing them, red-hot, to a shelf to cool.

When samba melodies have dissipated into air,

when lights wrapped around a willow have vanished,

what pattern of shifting lines leads to Duration?

Arthur Sze, one of America’s leading poets, is the author of nine books of poetry and translation. He is professor emeritus of creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts and just completed a term as Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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