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This title in other editions

Flying Close to the Sun: My Life and Times as a Weatherman

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Flying Close to the Sun: My Life and Times as a Weatherman Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Flying Close to the Sun is the memoir of a white middle-class girl from the suburbs who became what today many would call a terrorist — a bomb-making member of the Weather Underground — who then came to learn the lessons of the 1960s that other radicals of all stripes seem not to have learned.

Cathy Wilkerson, who famously blew up and escaped from her parents' Greenwich Village townhouse, here wrestles with the contradictions of the movement that still have not been publicly aired before now: the absence of women's voices; the incompetence and the egos; the hundreds of bombs detonated in protest, which caused little loss of life but were also ineffective in fomenting revolution.

Years later she realizes that in making decisions from a place of rage and hopelessness, the Weather Underground in effect accepted the same disregard for human life practiced by Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and William Westmoreland. They had abandoned themselves to the sanctimony of hating their enemies. In searching for new paradigms for change, Wilkerson asserts with brave humanity and confessional honesty an assessment of her past — of those heady, iconic times — and finds hope and faith in a world that at times seemed to offer neither.

Review:

"Wilkerson's writing conveys the urgency of the time as well as the 1960s slogan that all politics is personal. Most interesting is the account of the budding women's liberation movement and the resistance that 'radical' men showed to it." Library Journal

Review:

"Sharing her story of how a privileged young woman evolved into a central figure in one of the most iconic events of those turbulent years, Wilkerson's boldly candid, exceptionally detailed, and philosophically introspective memoir examines the lasting effects the movements successes and failures had on her personally and on society as a whole." Booklist

Review:

"[A] gracefully written and scrupulously researched memoir." Los Angeles Times

Synopsis:

The gentle truth of what went wrong in the sixties.

Synopsis:

Flying Close to the Sun is the stunning memoir of a white middle-class girl from Connecticut who became a member of the Weather Underground, one of the most notorious groups of the 1960s. Cathy Wilkerson, who famously escaped the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion, here wrestles with the

legacy of the movement, at times finding contradictions that many others have avoided: the absence of womens voices then, and in the retelling; the incompetence and the egos; the hundreds of bombs detonated in protest which caused little loss of life but which were also ineffective in fomenting revolution. In searching for new paradigms for change, Wilkerson asserts with brave humanity and confessional honesty an assessment of her past—of those heady, iconic times—and somehow finds hope and faith in a world that at times seems to offer neither.

Synopsis:

“On the morning of March 6, 1970, in the subbasement of 18 W. 11th Street in Greenwich Village, a piece of ordinary water pipe, filled with dynamite, nails, and an electric blasting cap, ignited by mistake…”

 So begins this stunning memoir of a white middle-class girl from Connecticut who became a member of the Weather Underground, one of the most notorious groups of the 1960s. Cathy Wilkerson, who famously blew up and escaped from a Greenwich Village townhouse, here wrestles with the legacy of the movement, at times looking at contradictions of the movement that many others have avoided: the absence of women’s voices then and in the retelling; the incompetence and the egos; the hundreds of bombs detonated in protest which caused little loss of life but which were also ineffective in fomenting revolution. While proud of many of the accomplishments of the 1960s, years later Wilkerson examines why, in 1970, she in effect accepted the same disregard for human life practiced by the government.  In searching for new paradigms for change, Wilkerson asserts with brave humanity and confessional honesty an assessment of her past—of those heady, iconic times—and finds hope and faith in a world that at times seems to offer neither. 

Cathy Wilkerson was active in the civil rights movement, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Weather Underground. In 1970, she, along with Kathy Boudin, survived an explosion in the basement of her parents’ townhouse that killed three Weathermen, forcing the two underground. For the past twenty years she has worked as an educator teaching teachers in the New York City schools.

About the Author

Cathy Wilkerson was active in the civil rights movement, SDS and the Weather Underground. In 1970, she, along with Kathy Boudin, survived an explosion in the basement of her parent's townhouse that killed 3 Weathermen, forcing them underground. For the past twenty years she has worked as an educator.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781583227718
Author:
Wilkerson, Cathy
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
Youth
Subject:
Women revolutionaries
Subject:
Criminals & Outlaws
Subject:
Political
Subject:
History & Theory - Radical Thought
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Youth -- United States -- Political activity.
Subject:
Women revolutionaries - United States
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20071031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 B&W photographs
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
0.00 x 0.00 in

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Related Subjects

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History and Social Science » World History » General
Metaphysics » General

Flying Close to the Sun: My Life and Times as a Weatherman Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.00 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Seven Stories Press - English 9781583227718 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Wilkerson's writing conveys the urgency of the time as well as the 1960s slogan that all politics is personal. Most interesting is the account of the budding women's liberation movement and the resistance that 'radical' men showed to it."
"Review" by , "Sharing her story of how a privileged young woman evolved into a central figure in one of the most iconic events of those turbulent years, Wilkerson's boldly candid, exceptionally detailed, and philosophically introspective memoir examines the lasting effects the movements successes and failures had on her personally and on society as a whole."
"Review" by , "[A] gracefully written and scrupulously researched memoir."
"Synopsis" by ,
The gentle truth of what went wrong in the sixties.
"Synopsis" by , Flying Close to the Sun is the stunning memoir of a white middle-class girl from Connecticut who became a member of the Weather Underground, one of the most notorious groups of the 1960s. Cathy Wilkerson, who famously escaped the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion, here wrestles with the

legacy of the movement, at times finding contradictions that many others have avoided: the absence of womens voices then, and in the retelling; the incompetence and the egos; the hundreds of bombs detonated in protest which caused little loss of life but which were also ineffective in fomenting revolution. In searching for new paradigms for change, Wilkerson asserts with brave humanity and confessional honesty an assessment of her past—of those heady, iconic times—and somehow finds hope and faith in a world that at times seems to offer neither.

"Synopsis" by ,
“On the morning of March 6, 1970, in the subbasement of 18 W. 11th Street in Greenwich Village, a piece of ordinary water pipe, filled with dynamite, nails, and an electric blasting cap, ignited by mistake…”

 So begins this stunning memoir of a white middle-class girl from Connecticut who became a member of the Weather Underground, one of the most notorious groups of the 1960s. Cathy Wilkerson, who famously blew up and escaped from a Greenwich Village townhouse, here wrestles with the legacy of the movement, at times looking at contradictions of the movement that many others have avoided: the absence of women’s voices then and in the retelling; the incompetence and the egos; the hundreds of bombs detonated in protest which caused little loss of life but which were also ineffective in fomenting revolution. While proud of many of the accomplishments of the 1960s, years later Wilkerson examines why, in 1970, she in effect accepted the same disregard for human life practiced by the government.  In searching for new paradigms for change, Wilkerson asserts with brave humanity and confessional honesty an assessment of her past—of those heady, iconic times—and finds hope and faith in a world that at times seems to offer neither. 

Cathy Wilkerson was active in the civil rights movement, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Weather Underground. In 1970, she, along with Kathy Boudin, survived an explosion in the basement of her parents’ townhouse that killed three Weathermen, forcing the two underground. For the past twenty years she has worked as an educator teaching teachers in the New York City schools.

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