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African Writers and Web Sites (05 Edition)

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African Writers and Web Sites (05 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Now a firmly established part of world literature course offerings in many general education curricula, African literature is no longer housed exclusively with African Studies programs, and is often studied in English, French, Portuguese, Women's Studies, and Comparative Studies departments. This book helps fill the great need for research materials on this topic, presenting the best resources available for 300 African writers. These writers have been carefully selected to include both well-known writers and those less commonly studied yet highly influential. They are drawn from both the Sub-Sahara and the Maghreb, the major geographical regions of Africa.

The study of Africa was introduced into the curriculum of institutions of higher learning in the United States in the 1960s, when the Black Consciousness movement in the United States and the Cold War and decolonization movements in Africa created a need for the systematic study of other regions of the world. Between 1986 and 1991, three Africans won Nobel literature prizes: Soyinka, Mahfouz, and Gordimer, and the visibility of African writers increased. They are now a firmly established part of world literature courses in many general education curricula throughout North America. African WriterS≪/i> is meant to serve as a resource for introductory material on 300 writers from 39 countries. These writers were selected on the basis on two criteria: that there is material on them in an easily available reference work; and that there is some information of research value on free Web sites. Each writer is from the late-19th or 20th century, with the notable exception of Olaudah Equiano, an 18th-century African whose slave narrative is generally considered the first work of African literature. All entries are annotated.

Book News Annotation:

This resource guides students to information on some 300 writers from 39 African countries. With one exception, all writers discussed are from the late 19th or 20th century, and all of them have a significant presence both in reference books and on the Web. Each writer's entry begins with his or her full name (with variants) and date of birth, followed by listings of Web sites, biographies, and literary criticism. Conteh-Morgan is a bibliographer for the Ohio State U. Libraries.
Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

This resource guides students to information on some 300 writers from 39 African countries. With one exception, all writers discussed are from the late 19th or 20th century, and all of them have a significant presence both in reference books and on the Web. Each writer's entry begins with his or her full name (with variants) and date of birth, followed by listings of Web sites, biographies, and literary criticism. Conteh-Morgan is a bibliographer for the Ohio State U. Libraries. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Now a firmly established part of world literature course offerings in many general education curricula, African literature is no longer housed exclusively with African Studies programs, and is often studied in English, French, Portuguese, Women's Studies, and Comparative Studies departments. This book helps fill the great need for research materials on this topic, presenting the best resources available for 300 African writers. These writers have been carefully selected to include both well-known writers and those less commonly studied yet highly influential. They are drawn from both the Sub-Sahara and the Maghreb, the major geographical regions of Africa.

The study of Africa was introduced into the curriculum of institutions of higher learning in the United States in the 1960s, when the Black Consciousness movement in the United States and the Cold War and decolonization movements in Africa created a need for the systematic study of other regions of the world. Between 1986 and 1991, three Africans won Nobel literature prizes: Soyinka, Mahfouz, and Gordimer, and the visibility of African writers increased. They are now a firmly established part of world literature courses in many general education curricula throughout North America. African Writersis meant to serve as a resource for introductory material on 300 writers from 39 countries. These writers were selected on the basis on two criteria: that there is material on them in an easily available reference work; and that there is some information of research value on free Web sites. Each writer is from the late-19th or 20th century, with the notable exception of Olaudah Equiano, an 18th-century African whose slave narrative is generally considered the first work of African literature. All entries are annotated.

Synopsis:

Discover the best resources available on 300 influential African writers, drawn from the major geographical regions of Sub-Sahara and Maghreb.

About the Author

MIRIAM E. CONTEH-MORGAN is Reference Librarian and Collection Manager for African Studies/Linguistics and French at Ohio State University Libraries, Columbus.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Alphabetical List of Authors

Authors by Nationality

Frequently cited Web sites

Frequently Cited References

Web sites and References for African Writers

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591581161
Author:
Conteh-morgan
Publisher:
Libraries Unlimited
Author:
Conteh-Morgan, Miriam E.
Author:
Conteh-Mor
Author:
Conteh-Morgan, Miriam
Subject:
Internet - Web Site Directories
Subject:
Online Services - General
Subject:
American - African American & Black
Subject:
Library & Information Science
Subject:
Computer network resources
Subject:
African literature
Subject:
American - African American
Subject:
Web - Site Directories
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Series:
Author Research Series
Publication Date:
20051231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Primary and secondary/elementary and high school
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9.24x6.30x.65 in. .75 lbs.

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Internet » Directories
Computers and Internet » Internet » Online
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
History and Social Science » Linguistics » Specific Languages and Groups
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

African Writers and Web Sites (05 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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$26.00 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Libraries Unlimited - English 9781591581161 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Now a firmly established part of world literature course offerings in many general education curricula, African literature is no longer housed exclusively with African Studies programs, and is often studied in English, French, Portuguese, Women's Studies, and Comparative Studies departments. This book helps fill the great need for research materials on this topic, presenting the best resources available for 300 African writers. These writers have been carefully selected to include both well-known writers and those less commonly studied yet highly influential. They are drawn from both the Sub-Sahara and the Maghreb, the major geographical regions of Africa.

The study of Africa was introduced into the curriculum of institutions of higher learning in the United States in the 1960s, when the Black Consciousness movement in the United States and the Cold War and decolonization movements in Africa created a need for the systematic study of other regions of the world. Between 1986 and 1991, three Africans won Nobel literature prizes: Soyinka, Mahfouz, and Gordimer, and the visibility of African writers increased. They are now a firmly established part of world literature courses in many general education curricula throughout North America. African Writersis meant to serve as a resource for introductory material on 300 writers from 39 countries. These writers were selected on the basis on two criteria: that there is material on them in an easily available reference work; and that there is some information of research value on free Web sites. Each writer is from the late-19th or 20th century, with the notable exception of Olaudah Equiano, an 18th-century African whose slave narrative is generally considered the first work of African literature. All entries are annotated.

"Synopsis" by , Discover the best resources available on 300 influential African writers, drawn from the major geographical regions of Sub-Sahara and Maghreb.
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